Programs

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Grant Programs

The Foundation has a variety of grant programs for anthropological research and scholarship that are open to applicants irrespective of nationality or country of residence. Guidelines, eligibility and application information are listed below.

A variety of the Foundation's grants support students enrolled in doctoral programs leading to a Ph.D. (or equivalent), including grants for dissertation research. There are also fellowship programs for doctoral students from countries where anthropology is underrepresented and where there are limited resources for educational training.

Grants are available to scholars with a doctorate include individual research grants, a limited number of writing fellowships, training for scholars from countries where academic training in anthropology is limited and awards to encourage collaborative research between international scholars.

All of the Foundation research grants are available to students and scholars regardless of nationality and place of residence. Alongside this, the Foundation has some specific programs to support students and scholars in countries where there are limited institutional and financial resources for anthropology.

Grants are available to bring international scholars together to develop anthropological knowledge and debate. Grants are made for amounts up to $20,000.

Other Programs

In addition to its grant-making programs, the Wenner-Gren Foundation provides specialized programs as well as a variety of sponsored activities that are making important contributions to the development of the discipline.

The Institutional Development Grant (IDG) supports the growth and development of anthropological doctoral programs in countries where the discipline is under-represented and where there are limited resources to support academic development.

The Foundation welcomes proposals for Wenner-Gren Symposia, which are week-long workshops organized and fully funded by the Foundation. Symposium papers are ultimately published in an open access supplementary issue of the Foundation’s journal, Current Anthropology. Themes chosen address “big” issues in Anthropology and reflect the international diversity of the discipline.

The Foundation founded Current Anthropology in 1959 and continues to sponsor its publication today. It is one of the leading international scholarly journals in the field, publishing articles, reports, interviews and book reviews as well as discussion and commentary.

This program promotes the preservation of the history of anthropology by assisting senior scholars (or their heirs) with the expense of preparing their personal research collections for archival deposit.