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Fire and the Genus Homo

Symp 152 Group Photo

Wenner-Gren Symposium #152
October 15-22, 2015
Tivoli Palacio de Seteais, Sintra, Portugal

PUBLICATION: In progress

PARTICIPANTS:

Leslie Aiello (Wenner-Gren Foundation, USA)
Vera Aldeais (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany)
Nira Alperson-Afil (Bar-Ilan University, Israel)
Ran Barkai (Tel-Aviv University, Israel)
Francesco Berna, organizer (Simon Fraser University, Canada)
Michael Chazan (University of Toronto, Canada)
Harold L. Dibble (University of Pennsylvania, USA)
Xing Gao (Chinese Academy of Sciences, PRC)
Paul Goldberg (University of Wollongong, Australia, and Eberhard-Karls-Universitat, Germany)
John Gowlett (University of Liverpool, UK)
Amanda G. Henry (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany)
Sarah Hlubik (Rutgers University, USA)
Simon Holdaway (University of Auckland, NZ)
Carolina Mallol (Universidad de La Laguna, Spain) 
Jill D. Pruetz (University of Iowa, USA)
Dennis Sandgathe, organizer (Simon Fraser University, Canada) 
Meg Thibodeau, monitor (Simon Fraser University, Canada)
Randall White (New York University, USA)
Richard Wrangham (Harvard University, USA)

Organizers' Statement

We have come to recognize that the nature of human adaptations must be viewed in the context of bio-cultural evolution. For the last 2.5 million years, at least, hominins have evolved both biologically and culturally with these two facets irretrievably entangled. Fire use must be seen as one of the most important of the technological components of this interplay: it has very likely had major effects on our biological evolution, which in turn likely led to other major technological changes, such as the development of clothing and artificial shelter and changes in hominin diet. In fact, the biology, micro-environment, and behavior of modern humans are deeply entangled with fire-use to the point that the survival of our species has come to essentially depend on it.

While there has always been general interest among anthropologists and archaeologists in the role fire played in human evolution, in the last 10 years new hypotheses and archaeological finds in Africa and Eurasia have sparked a renewed interest in trying to further our understanding. In the 1980s and 1990s the focus of this kind of research was more on trying to recognize the oldest evidence for hominin use of fire.  Recent interest has shifted to the questions about how and when fire use became an established and integral part of all hominin cultures. The first evidence for hominin use of fire does not necessarily mark the point at which hominins learned how to make it and it became inextricably part of hominin technological repertoires. Recent discoveries suggest that the history of hominin use of fire is more complex than previously hypothesized and that anthropologists and archaeologists should be more critical of potential evidence of hominin use of fire.

Based on current bio-anthropological, phylogenetic, and/or archaeological data we believe we could identify four general models for the role played by the use of fire in the evolution of the Genus Homo. These are alternative views on the timing and nature of the adoption of fire use:

  1. Homo erectus was fully adapted to a cooked food diet and had controlled use of fire by or shortly after two million years ago (the "cooking hypothesis").
  2. Gradual or intermittent use of fire began during the Early Stone Age (i.e., by groups of Homo erectus and early H. heidelbergensis).
  3. Hominins (H. heidelbergensis?) used it first and used it in the process of colonizing higher latitude regions of Europe and Asia at the end of the Lower Pleistocene or during the early Middle Pleistocene.
  4. Humans had complete control of fire only with the appearance of H. sapiens at the onset of the Late Stone Age/Upper Palaeolithic.

Thus, work on the evidence of early fire use is clearly necessary to help answer the fundamental anthropological question: "How did humans become human?" This symposium is designed to bring together scholars who are conducting leading research on the origin of the controlled use of fire and its cultural and biological significance to the genus Homo.

Researchers have begun to collect, review and employ new types of archaeological and biological data and have started to pose new questions about the role of fire in human evolution. There is also a notable increase in the number of researchers who are focused specifically on questions of prehistoric fire use. In past decades most analysis of Palaeolithic fire residues was simply one of many issues individual archaeologists might address in the course of interpreting a site. This was typically done in isolation from data from other sites and from other researchers who may have an interest in the topic, and it was not often directed towards bigger questions of prehistoric fire use.

While access to new data is an important part of the process of assessing the relative merits of these different models, the goal of the symposium is not just to discuss data collection techniques or the interpretation of individual archaeological sites. Rather, the aim is to collectively review the old and the newer data, revise methodological approaches, discuss integrated, up-to-date scenarios for hominin development of fire technology, and develop a theoretical and methodological framework for future research. The objectives of the symposium include:

  • Discussing best possible approaches to select and integrate data collection: what types of data are particularly important for understanding prehistoric fire use and what is the importance of disseminating these data? Should (and can) certain standards of data collection be established? Are there other types of data that we should be collecting?
  • Developing a common understanding of what is meant by the terms 'occasional,' ‘habitual,' and ‘controlled’ use of fire. These terms have become rather entrenched in the literature, but their actual meaning remains ambiguous: different researchers may have slightly different intentions with their use and different understandings of their implications.
  • Developing anthropological and archaeological methodological criteria by which researchers could identify when humans started to use fire occasionally or habitually, and when they developed the technology to create it. These issues have implications for the development of hominin migration/distributions, diet, bio-cultural evolution, and the onset of 'modern behavior.'
  • Examining the role that cooking may have played in the bio-cultural evolution of the Genus Homo.
     
  • Addressing questions about the function of fire in pre-modern human adaptations (e.g., specific fire applications, degree of reliance); the role of fire in Late Pleistocene adaptations (Neanderthals and early Anatomically Modern Humans); and the role of fire in the emergence of modern behavior.