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WGF Symposium #110 Group Photo
Front (seated): L. Obbink, P. Greenfield, D. Falk, C. Snowdon, T. Ingold, K. Gibson, J. Langer, S. Goldin-Meadow, S. Savage-Rumbaugh, S. Parker, F. Pinto Lopez, N. Toth. Back: I. Davidson, B. Giebus, C. Boesch, E. Visalberghi, S. Silverman, W. McGrew, P. Graves, T. Wynn, A. Lock, W. Calvin, P. Lieberman, D. Kempler, G. Hewes, A. Kendon.

WENNER-GREN FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM #110
March 16 - 24, 1990
Hotel do Guincho, Cascais, Portugal

PUBLICATION:    Tools, Language and Cognition in Human Evolution (Kathleen Gibson and Tim Ingold, Eds.) Cambridge University Press, 1993.

PARTICIPANTS:

bookcoverChristophe Boesch (University of Basel, Switzerland)
William Calvin (University of Washington, USA)
Iain Davidson (University of New England, Australia)
Dean Falk (State University of New York, Albany, USA)
Kathleen Gibson, organizer (University of Texas, Houston, USA)
Susan Goldin-Meadow (University of Chicago, USA)
Paul Graves, monitor (University of Southampton, UK)
Patricia Greenfield (University of California, Los Angeles, USA)
Gordon Hewes (University of Colorado, USA)
Tim Ingold, organizer (University of Manchester, UK)
Dan Kempler (University of Southern California, USA)
Adam Kendon (Independent Scholar, USA)
Jonas Langer (University of California, Berkeley, USA)
Philip Lieberman (Brown University, USA)
Andrew Lock (University of Lancaster, UK)
William McGrew (University of Sterling, UK)
Sue Parker (Sonoma State University, USA)
E. Sue Savage-Rumbaugh (Georgia State University/ Emory University, USA)
Sydel Silverman (Wenner-Gren Foundation, USA)
Charles Snowdon (University of Wisconsin, USA)
Nicholas Toth (Indiana University, USA)
Elisabetta Visalberghi (Instituto di Psicologia Comparata, Italy)
Thomas Wynn (University of Colorado, USA)

Abstract:

This interdisciplinary conference focused on a key problem in the study of humanity ­the evolution of the human intellect and its technological, linguistic and social correlates. Conference discussions touched upon such issues as the nature of ape-human behavioral distinctions, the invention of syntax, the neurology of gesture, tool use and language, the significance of brain size, and the cognitive capacities needed to manufacture stone tools. Participants were drawn from Europe, Africa, Australia and the United States and represented the fields of biological and social anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, psychology, zoology and neuroscience.