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International Symposium #104
Back Row: N. Watson, R. Martin, S. Silverman, A. Boyd, G. Harrison, C. Stringer, E. Trinkaus, E. Watts, P. Harvey, M. Morbeck, P. Alberch, L. Newell-Morris, T. Bromage, A. Zihlman, L. Lanyon Front Row: B. Shea, L. Marom, D. Sade, J. DeRousseau, D. Van Gerven, A. Galloway, E. Vrba, N. Peacock, L. Osmundsen

WENNER-GREN FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM #104
October 10 - 18, 1987
Hotel Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico

PUBLICATION:    Primate Life History and Evolution (C.J. DeRousseau, Ed.) Monographs in Primatology, Vol. 14.  Wiley-Liss Publishers, New York, 1990.

PARTICIPANTS:

bookcoverPere Alberch (Harvard University, USA)
Alan Boyde (University College, London, UK)
Timothy Bromage (University of London, UK)
C. Jean DeRousseau, organizer (New York University, USA)
Alison Galloway (University of Arizona, USA)
G. Ainsworth Harrison (University of Oxford, UK)
Paul H. Harvey (University of Oxford, UK)
Lance E. Lanyon (University of London, UK)
Robert Martin (Universit├Ąt Zurich-Irchel, Switzerland)
Mary Ellen Morbeck, organizer (University of Arizona, USA)
Laura Newell-Morris (University of Washington, USA)
Nadine Peacock (University of California, Los Angeles, USA)
Donald Stone Sade (Northwestern University, USA)
Brian Shea (Northwestern University, USA)
Sydel Silverman (Wenner-Gren Foundation, USA)
Christopher Stringer (British Museum of Natural History, UK)
Erik Trinkaus (University of New Mexico, USA)
Dennis Van Gerven (University of Colorado, USA)
Elizabeth Vrba (Yale University, USA)
Elizabeth Watts (Tulane University, USA)
Adrienne Zihlman (University of California, Santa Cruz, USA)

Abstract:

The goal of the conference was to focus on the role of individual life history as part of the adaptation of the species in the dynamics of the evolutionary process. Taking a perspective that had thus far been neglected in studies of human evolution, the conference sought to delineate the patterns of variations in growth, development, and aging in humans and in the nonhuman primates, in an effort to track potential change in populations through time. The theoretical framework combined comparative, functional, and evolutionary approaches. A diverse group of scholars addressed the topic from their expertise in fossil material, genetics, human ecology and adaptation, ecological and social organization of humans and nonhumans, functional morphology, human growth and development, aging, and evolutionary theory.