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International Symposium #97
Front Row: S. Humphreys, L. Nader, C Greenhouse, J. Collier, J. Starr, J. Nash, H. Grotenbreg , J. Kuper, E. Colson Middle Row: L. Rosen, B. Cohn, S. Arjomand, J. Vincent, N. Watson Back Row: F. Snyder, R. Hayden, S. Falk Moore, P. Gulliver, W. Twining, V. Aubert, A. Blok, J. Boissevain, G. Collier, R. Maddox, L. Osmundsen

WENNER-GREN FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM #97
August 10 - 18, 1985
Bellagio Study and Conference Center, Lake Como, Italy

PUBLICATION:    History and Power in the Study of Law:  New Directions in Legal Anthropology (J. Starr and J.F. Collier, Eds.) Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 1989.

PARTICIPANTS:

bookcoverSaid Arjomand (State University of New York, Stony Brook, USA)
Vilhelm Aubert (University of Oslo, Norway)
Anton Blok (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Jeremy Boissevain (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Bernard Cohn (University of Chicago, USA)
George Collier (Stanford University, USA)
Jane Collier, organizer (Stanford University, USA)
Elizabeth Colson (University of California, Berkeley, USA)
Carol Greenhouse (Cornell University, USA)
Hanneke Grotenbreg (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Philip Gulliver (York University, Canada)
Robert Hayden (American Bar Foundation, USA)
Sally Humphreys (University College, London, UK)
Jessica Kuper (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)
Richard Maddox, rapporteur (Stanford University, USA)
Sally Falk Moore (Harvard University, USA)
Laura Nader (University of California, Berkeley, USA)
June Nash (City College, New York, USA)
Lita Osmundsen (Wenner-Gren Foundation, USA)
Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University, USA)
Francis G. Snyder (University College, London, UK)
June Starr, organizer (State University of New York, Stony Brook, USA)
William Twining (University College, London, UK)
Joan Vincent (Barnard College, USA)

Abstract

The goal of the conference was to compare case studies of legal change in particular societies using historical frameworks in order to search for shared questions and methodologies to direct future research. The twenty anthropologists, sociologists, and law professors from North America and Europe who attended devoted five half-days to discussing seventeen previously circulated papers and four half-days to a general consideration of conference issues.  In their discussion, participants focused on the models they were using to analyze the development, change, decay, integration, and articulation of legal systems within specific social units.