Grantees

View grantees in the Image Library

Echenique, Ester

Grant Type
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation
Arizona, U. of
Status
Completed Grant
Approve Date
Project Title
Echenique, Ester, U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid research on 'Style, Ideology, and Empire: Rethinking Materiality in the Southern Inka Expansion,' supervised by Dr. David Killick

ESTER ECHENIQUE, then a graduate student at University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, was awarded a grant in April 2015 to aid research on 'Style, Ideology, and Empire: Rethinking Materiality in the Southern Inka Expansion,' supervised by Dr. David Killick. Through the study of Yavi-Chicha pottery from two sites in the Rio Grande de San Juan Basin (Bolivia and Argentina) and from multiple sites in the Loa Basin and Atacama Salt Flat Basin (Chile), this project investigated the relationship between technological style, social identities, and communities of practice during the late prehistory of the Circumpuna area (the tri-border region of southern Bolivia, northwestern Argentina, and northern Chile). Through archaeological and archaeometric methods, this research asked: 1) Why the Yavi-Chicha ceramics were so extensively used and distributed in the Circumpuna region; and 2) How practices of ceramic production and consumption were articulated with processes of community formation and social identity, and how they were affected by the Inka advent. Funding supported the second phase of analyses. These included petrographic, chemical, and experimental analyses. The project documented extended Yavi-Chicha pottery consumption possibly produced at the site of Chipihuayco (Bolivia). The analyses of materials from the archaeological records and from contemporary potters suggest the existence of one community of practice at Chipihuayco. The intra and interregional level of analyses indicate a regional social identity that that was articulated with local communities of identities. The Yavi-Chicha pottery consumption seemed to change during the Inka Period, suggesting that the establishment of the Inka in the region changed the structure of social identities.