Krebs, Edgardo C

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
July 31, 2012
Project Title: 
Krebs, Edgardo, Bethesda, MD - To aid an analysis of the ethnographic films and collections of material culture by Paul Fejos in Madagascar, Nordisk Film Archives, Valby, Denmark
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$6,000

Fee, Sarah E.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Lapsed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 16, 2008
Project Title: 
Fee, Dr. Sarah, Washington, DC - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Wilton S. Dillon for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$10,740

Aparicio, Juan R.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Aparicio, Juan R., U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC - To aid research on 'Beyond Human Rights and Humanitarian Interventions: Internally Displaced Persons, Autonomy and Collective Ethical Projects in Colombia,' supervised by Dr. Arturo Escobar

JUAN RICARDO APARICIO, then a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, was awarded a grant in May 2007 to aid research on 'Beyond Human Rights and Humanitarian Interventions: Internally Displaced Persons, Autonomy and Collective Ethical Projects in Colombia,' supervised by Dr. Arturo Escobar. This dissertation project explored the production and circulation of discourses, practices, and objects related to the problem of internal displacement along a network that connects international institutions based in Geneva or Washington, with the local initiatives that have been defined as 'collective ethical projects' in two regions in Colombia. The location of the fieldwork sites included the rural areas of the Urabá region, the rivers in the Pacific coastland and offices of national and international institutions in the capital Bogotá, among others. Regarding the rural locations, fieldwork devoted to analyze the complex strategies deployed by both collectives to defend their own ethical projects, and the manifold challenges they are still facing today. From particular enunciations made by participants using a rights-based language to the proliferation of white shirts and flags carried by international officers and activists, among many others, both of these projects are deeply entangled in networks of the human rights and humanitarian global assemblage. In fact, as this multi-sited ethnography has proven, the emergence of these collective ethical projects could only be explained by an analytic that is aware of the different actors, scales, changing strategies, larger contexts and specificities of each region.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$24,284

Vellinga, Marcel

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford Brookes U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
May 3, 2016
Project Title: 
Vellinga, Marcel, Oxford Brookes U., Oxford, UK - To aid preparation of the personal papers of Dr. Paul Oliver for archival deposit with Oxford Brooke's U. Library - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2016
Award Amount: 
$6,228

Richen, Vereshnee

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Witwatersrand, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
June 2, 2005
Project Title: 
Richen, Vereshnee, U. of Witwatersrand, Wits, South Africa - To aid study in social anthropology at the U. of Witwatersrand, Wits, South Africa, supervised by Dr. Rehana Ebrahim-Vally
Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$1,875

Levi, Margaret

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Stanford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 5, 2015
Project Title: 
Levi, Dr. Margaret, Stanford U., Stanford, CA - To aid workshop on 'Anthropological Epistemology and Cross-Cultural Metacategories,' 2015, Stanford U., in collaboration with Dr. Howard Morphy

Preliminary abstract: The aim of the workshop is to generate reflective discourse on anthropological epistemology. The workshop has both pragmatic and exploratory objectives, building on the theme of cross-cultural/cross-temporal meta-categories in the context of anthropology as interdisciplinary environment for research into human society. Historically anthropology has implicitly created meta-categories for a discourse that encompass different but synergistic ways of thinking about things and acting in the world -- art, aesthetics, gender, family, household, law, property, mind, and so on. The cross-cultural and/or cross-temporal meta-category is dialogic. It exists between different local categorizations, yet simultaneously strives to encompass difference. Recently a tension has developed anthropology between theoretical perspectives which focus on the problematization of boundaries and the dissolution of categories and those earlier perspectives which attempted to develop cross-cultural meta-categories in order to understand the diversity of human societies and the nature of regional trajectories. This workshop has the potential to influence future directions by reflecting on the terminologies employed and the perspectives that lie behind them and placing them in the context of the history of the discipline and the dialogical nature of the relationships with the subjects of their research.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Gilbert, Andrew

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
McMaster U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 1, 2013
Project Title: 
Gilbert, Dr. Andrew, McMaster U., Hamilton, Ontario, Canada - To aid workshop on 'Towards an Anthropology of International Intervention,' 2013, McMaster U.

Preliminary abstract: This workshop proposes to chart new theoretical territory and set a new agenda for an ethnographically-grounded, historically-sensitive anthropology of international intervention in the 21st century. The world has recently witnessed the proliferation of new and ambitious forms of foreign intervention by powerful Western states, guided by rationales and aims that were only nascent during the Cold War. Initiated at moments of political and humanitarian crisis, such interventions seek not only to bring care to the suffering or an end to conflict, but also use such occasions to transform the conditions which lie at the root of conflict and suffering. To this end, and often under conditions of military occupation or foreign supervision, such interventions sought to transform the very nature of the social. Anthropology has played a modest role in the critical scholarship that has responded to this proliferation of foreign interventions. Drawing on a range of theory, anthropologists have offered important critiques designed to show that the modes of power exercised in the name of care or democracy are anything but benign. With a few exceptions, however, anthropological scholarship has focused largely on the interveners and their ambitions, thus excluding attention to those intervened upon, as well as the complex relations between the two that arise out of the intervention encounter. Much of this work is also ethnographically or historically thin when it comes to discussing the effects of such interventions on the people and places that are the objects of intervention. This workshop will put current anthropological accounts and their theoretical underpinnings into conversation with the research of a new generation of younger scholars with extensive ethnographic experience working across diverse sites of intervention. By situating international intervention projects within the wider social and cultural fields in which they take place, this workshop seeks to build upon this important work and act as a corrective to some of its gaps.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$9,500

Behrouzan, Orkideh

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2009
Project Title: 
Behrouzan, Orkideh, M.I.T, Cambridge, MA - To aid research on 'Prozak Diaries: Alternative Genealogies of Psychiatric Selves, Discourses, and Dealing with Conditions of Impossibility in Post-War Iran,' supervised by Dr. Michael Fischer

Preliminary abstract removed at grantee's request.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Wever, Jerry L.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Iowa, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 12, 2001
Project Title: 
Wever, Jerry L., U. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA - To aid research on 'Shaping Creolization and Folkorization Processes: Expressive Culture and Creole Identity in St. Lucia and Seychelles, ' supervised by Dr. Laura R. Graham

JERRY WEVER, then a student at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, received a grant in July 2001 to aid research on 'Shaping Creolization and Folklorization Processes: Expressive Culture and Creole Identity in St. Lucia and Seychelles,' supervised by Dr. Laura R. Graham. The dissertation fieldwork project was successfully completed in April 2003, accomplishing the devised research plan. Data collected on new creolizations in expressive culture show that creolization and decolonization are both ongoing processes that are usefully studied in connection with each other, and that social actors shape creolization processes in an attempt to transform power relations and decolonize creole identities. The case studies in St. Lucia center on a new creolization of Afro-St. Lucian folk forms involving the use of U.S. Country and Western (C&W). St. Lucians with their heightened consciousness of the colonization of expressive forms attempt to control the contemporary creolization by reactivating moribund Afro-St. Lucian storytelling-song traditions and inserting them into the framework of C& W. The Seychelles case studies highlight how the smaller islands in and near Seychelles are involved in Seychellois efforts to folklorize, reclaim, and renew creole expressive cultural traditions. The co-option of the expressive traditions of outer islands reveals how some benefit at the expense of others in the decolonization process. In all, 352 interviews were conducted: 107 from the Indian Ocean, and 245 from St. Lucia. The data collection includes: over 1000 pages of computer typed notes and over 600 handwritten pages; 33 DA T tapes, 160 cassette tapes (90min); 150 CDs; 45 VHS tapes; 62 digital video camera tapes (60 min.); 75 rolls of film; a full collection of newspapers; government statistics; and photocopied archive material.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$19,986

Saraiva, Maria Clara Fereira Almeida

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Centro em Rede de Investigacao em Antropologia
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 1, 20