Dewey, Susan Catherine

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Wyoming, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2012
Project Title: 
Dewey, Dr. Susan Catherine, U. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY - To aid research on 'Feeding Fiji: Ethnicity and the Feminized Labor of Market Trade in the Suva and Labasa Municipal Markets'

DR. SUSAN C. DEWEY, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, received a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'Feeding Fiji: Ethnicity and the Feminized Labor of Market Trade in the Suva and Labasa Municipal Markets.' This project examined the role played by the feminized labor of market trade in the creation, reinforcement, and subversion of ethnic differences and accompanying political rhetoric. Research on the islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu involved close collaboration with U.N. Women's 'Markets for Change' project, and produced: 223 verbatim transcripts from extensive semi-structured interviews with women market traders in the Suva, Labasa, Savusavu Municipal markets; 60 verbatim transcripts with women involved in trade-related activities between Suva and Viti Levu and Vanua Levu villages or outlying islands; 64 quantitative surveys with traders and market administrators; 230 pages of market-related historical documents from the Fiji National Archives and The Fiji Times; and several hundred pages of fieldnotes based upon marketplace and market-related preparation activites in Kadavu, Naitasiri, Nabouwalu, Savusavu, and Taveuni, as well as Suva and Labasa. Results of this research appear in at least a dozen internal and publicly available reports for U.N. Women as well as in scholarly journals. Data collected as part of the funded research will ultimately result in a book-length ethnography, tentatively titled 'Of Morality and Mangoes: The Gendered Labor of Market Trade in Fiji.'

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$24,070

Kensinger, Steven Andrew

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Minnesota, Minneapolis-St.Paul, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 7, 2014
Project Title: 
Kensinger, Steven A., U. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN - To aid research on 'The Maori City: Disaster Capitalism, Tribal Identity, and Earthquake Reconstruction in Christchurch, New Zealand,' supervised by Dr. David Lipset

Preliminary abstract: This project is an ethnographic study of the post-earthquake reconstruction of the city of Christchurch, New Zealand. The Canterbury region of New Zealand's South Island was struck by a series of devastating earthquakes between September of 2010 and June of 2011. More than 100,000 homes were damaged and 60% of businesses in the central city were displaced as a result of the earthquake. The recovery plan developed by the New Zealand government named Ngai Tahu, the largest Maori tribe in the South Island, as a 'strategic partner' in the reconstruction of the city. This project asks how the recognition of Ngai Tahu by the state as a stakeholder in the reconstruction of the city is transforming the meaning of Ngai Tahu identity in contemporary Christchurch. I will investigate how the earthquake recovery offers a way for Maori to enact their sovereignty through their recognition as a strategic partner, while also having dramatic impacts on the reproduction of Maori social organization and processes of ethnic identity formation.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$20,000

O'Brien, Aoife Sara

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
East Anglia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2008
Project Title: 
O'Brien, Aoife Sara, U. of East Anglia, Norfolk, UK - To aid research on 'Colonial Collections, Indigenous Experiences: Exploring Social Transformations in the Solomon Islands through Museum Collections, 1896-1914,' supervised by Dr. Steven J. P. Hooper

AOIFE O'BRIEN, then a student at University of East Anglia, Norfolk, United Kingdom, received funding in April 2008 to aid research on 'Colonial Collections, Indigenous Experiences: Exploring Social Transformations in the Solomon Islands through Museum Collections, 1896-1914,' supervised by Dr. Steven J. P. Hooper. This research project examines the museum collections of Charles Morris Woodford (1852-1927), an amateur naturalist and first Resident Commissioner to the Solomons, and Arthur Mahaffy (1869-1919), the first District Officer of the region. It examines how, following the establishment of the British Solomon Islands Protectorate (BSIP) in 1893, transformations occurred in Solomons cultural traditions and society, transformations that are visible in the material culture record. Object analysis (conceived widely to include ethnographic artefacts, texts, and photographs) can elucidate the micro-histories, particularly muted indigenous experiences, embodied in museum collections. Research was undertaken at several institutions in Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji to examine archive material and museum collections associated with Woodford, Mahaffy, and the BSIP. This research has assisted in gaining a fuller understanding of both men's positions in the Solomons and the extent of networks of collecting and cross-cultural interactions in which objects were gathered. Information obtained from each institution granted further insights into the nature of encounters and exchanges between Europeans and Solomon Islanders during the formative years of the BSIP, and has complemented and enriched the research already completed in the UK and Ireland.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$9,595

Tuzin, Donald F.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Diego, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 13, 2001
Project Title: 
Tuzin, Dr. Donald F., U. of California - San Diego, La Jolla, CA - To aid preparation of personal research materials of Derek Freeman for archival deposit with the Geisel Library at the University of California, San Diego
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$6,000

Di Rosa, Dario

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 14, 2013
Project Title: 
Di Rosa, Dario, Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid research on 'Remembering the Colonial Past: Histories and Historicities of Kerewo People (Gulf Province, Papua New Guinea),' supervised by Dr. Christopher Hugh Lewis Ballard

DARIO DI ROSA, then a graduate student at Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, was awarded funding in October 2013 to aid research on 'Remembering the Colonial Past: Histories and Historicities of Kerewo People (Gulf Province, Papua New Guinea),' supervised by Dr. Chris Ballard. This ethnography of Kerewo historical consciousness suggests that people's relations to their past and future is better understood in terms of cultural capital, used to acquire social or economic capital, instead of essentialist culture-specific world views. This work contributes to the fields of Anthropology (and its growing interest in ethnographic analysis of historical consciousness) and History, by closely scrutinizing the practices underlying the uses of the past, comparing Kerewo's practices with Western historiographical ones. The manipulation of the past is analyzed mainly within two social arenas: 1) Christian denominational fights to dominate the shaping of the Peace and Reconciliation Ceremony (a rite to lift the curse casted by the killing of LMS missionary James Chalmers in 1901); and 2) ideologies of modernity. The relation between Christianity and the development of ideologies of modernity is well established in the literature. Nevertheless this ethnography contributes to the anthropological literature on 'modernity' by paying attention to the nexus between 'expectations' and 'desires' created by discourses of modernity, and the ritual manipulation of the future, resulting in what the grantee terms 'frustrated modernity.''

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$15,600

Kuchler, Susanne

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
College London, U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 18, 2002
Project Title: 
Kuchler, Dr. Susanne A., U. College London, London, UK - To aid conference on translating things: cloth and innovation in the Pacific, 2003, British Museum, in collaboration with Dr. Chloe Colchester
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$11,211

O'Reilly, Jessica

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Cruz, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 4, 2005
Project Title: 
O'Reilly, Jessica, U. of California, Santa Cruz, CA - To aid research on 'Policy and Practice in Antarctic Specially Managed Areas,' supervised by Dr. Hugh Raffles

JESSICA O'REILLY, then a student at University of California, Santa Cruz, California, received funding in October 2005 to aid research on 'Policy and Practice in Antarctic Specially Managed Areas,' supervised by Dr. Hugh Raffles. What are the practices -- discursive or otherwise -- through which scientists and other Antarctic community members succeed at making Antarctica a model of environmentalism as well as a place of 'peace and science'? Research activities involved twelve months of fieldwork in Christchurch, New Zealand, working with an Antarctic scientific research expedition, observing conferences, meetings, and workshops, and conducting ethnographic interviews. This project is based upon an analysis of the relationships between scientists and policy makers at the McMurdo Dry Valleys Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA). However, the people involved in the Dry Valleys ASMA are also intensely involved in other emerging Antarctic environmental issues. Therefore, this project examines articulations of policy and practice not only in ASMA management plans and implementation, but also in the histories of Antarctic environmental practices, competing strategies about non-native species in the Antarctic, and the ways in which Antarctic experts engage with non-experts over the science and politics of climate change. The resulting dissertation will analyze the ways in which Antarctic science and policy complicate each other and the ways in which scientists, policy makers, Antarctic lifeforms and object, data, and paperwork are arranged to influence environmental management on the continent.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$12,100

van Meijl, Toon H.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Nijmegen, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 5, 2015
Project Title: 
Van Meijl, Dr. Toon, Radboud U., Nijmegen, The Netherlands - To aid conference of European Society for Oceanists (ESFO) on 'Europe and the Pacific,' 2015, Brussels, Belgium, in collaboration with Dr. Anke Tonnaer

'Europe and the Pacfic: The 10th Conference of the European Society of Oceanists (ESFO)
June 24-27, 2015, Brussels, Belgium
Organizers: Toon Van Meijl (Radboud U.) and Anke Tonnaer (U. Nijmegen)

Meeting discussions focused on the increasing call from the Pacific for a new kind of relationship with Europe. Current European engagements in the Pacific are taking place especially through connections in trade relations, sustainable development programs, tourism, humanitarian aid, legal-political relations, new migration patterns, and concerns about the impacts of global climate change. In some respects, however, European connections to the Oceanic region relate uncomfortably to the aspirations and ambitions of Pacific peoples themselves, who wish to engage with peoples of other regions on their own social and cultural terms, and on the basis of their own economic and political interests. Indeed, Pacific Islanders increasingly demand to define priorities in their connections with Europe from their own perspective. These calls from the Pacific for a new kind of relationship with Europe -- in whatever shape or form Europe may be perceived as a region -- require further reflection. This conference aimed at creating a dialogue between Pacific and European perspectives, in which exchanges of knowledge and processes of mediation might spark a rethinking of historical, contemporary and future connections between Europe and the Pacific.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$16,550

Diettrich, Brian

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 3, 2005
Project Title: 
Diettrich, Brian, U. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI - To aid research on 'Transforming Colonial Encounters: Performing Arts and Conceptions of Tradition in Chuuk, Micronesia,' supervised by Dr. Jane Moulin
Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$18,500

Lempert, William David

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Colorado, Boulder, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Lempert, William David, U. of Colorado, Boulder, CO - To aid research on 'Broadcasting Indigeneity: The Social Life of Aboriginal Media,' supervised by Dr. Jennifer Shannon

Preliminary abstract: In the opening months of 2013, the first national 24-hour Indigenous Australian television networks were launched, representing two distinct sensibilities of Aboriginal media aesthetics and economics--grassroots community vs. polished professional--that have emerged at the local, regional, and now national levels. These Indigenous mass media represent less than 3% of the total population, yet have received desirable slots on the national satellite network that is newly capable of reaching all remote Aboriginal communities. To follow the social lives of Indigenous video projects from initial idea through local reception, I will participate within the production teams at Goolarri and PAKAM, two cohabiting Indigenous media organizations that closely map onto, and disproportionately contribute to, these national networks. Rather than asking what identity is, I seek to complicate and illuminate anthropological understandings of indigeneity by revealing how Indigenous media makers negotiate the manifold often-paradoxical pressures that shape their final products. With unusually high levels of media productivity and success in Aboriginal political activism, the regional hub of Broome and the Aboriginal community of Yungngora in Northwestern Australia will provide an ideal backdrop for articulating the stakes that are at play in the ways in which Indigenous peoples represent different visions of indigeneity.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$15,995
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