Barron, Desiree Lynette

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 9, 2014
Project Title: 
Barron, Desiree Lynette, New York U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'Indigenous Maori Cultural Production Through Sport,' supervised by Dr. Fred Myers

Preliminary abstract: In the bicultural settler state of Aotearoa/New Zealand, Maori participation in rugby is especially notable as a site for Maori distinction, yet remains understudied as a significant site for cultural production. While rugby is celebrated as a valorized sphere for Maori public participation and critiques of the nature of representations of Maori in rugby are persistent features of rugby culture, there is much more to understand beyond this binary. My proposed ethnographic study and analysis of rugby as a field of cultural production (one in which New Zealand's indigenous Maori have been uniquely successful) allows for a nuanced understanding of the successes, failures, and controversies specific to the Maori experience of rugby as a 'global media sport': from the use of indigenous cultural property in sports promotion, to racially-inflected and potentially exploitative recruitment targeting of Maori athletes, to its place in communities and social networks, as well as a source of individual career opportunities. Preliminary research reveals that all these rely on the public spaces and activities offered by amateur rugby clubs. In distinction to macro-level critiques of sports' political economy, or cultural studies' critiques of representation in sport, this project seeks to engage Maori in their community-level incarnations, while attending to the broader social field of rugby, in order to understand how Maori indigenize this sport, and how we, as anthropologists, can understand their assertion (as in Mulholland 2009) that these projects constitute a specific way of being Maori.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$1,370

Halvaksz, Jamon Alex

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, San Antonio, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 10, 2013
Project Title: 
Halvaksz, Dr. Jamon Alex, U. of Texas, San Antonio, TX - To aid research on 'Large Scale Mining Development and Agricultural Change in Papua New Guinea'

Preliminary abstract: In a context of an industrial gold mine operated with the consent of indigenous landowners in Papua New Guinea, this research examines transformations of work and identity as expressed though subsistence agriculture and cash crops. As community members are trained in the practices of a large-scale resource extraction project, and taught to meet expectations defined by global capital, do they change local gardening practices? This research uses a combination of spatial and ethnographic methods to compare the landowner community of Winima, who receive compensation and priority employment opportunities, with their immediate neighbors in Elauru, who live outside the leased area of the mine. During earlier research periods, both communities shared stories, agricultural practices, remaining interconnected through land and kinship, and still speak the same language. As a 2011 pilot study suggested, this might be changing as Winima residents reorient production toward market sensibilities, and increasingly embody the ideals of individual responsibility celebrated by the mine. To address this dynamic, three research questions are explored: 1) How do the daily routines of mining transform local agricultural practices? 2) How does mining change village social relations, especially practices of land tenure, gender equality, and the social role of food production? 3) In light of their experiences with mining, how do communities view their relationship with local spaces of production? By addressing these core questions this research seeks to understand the emergence of new kinds of subjects who are marked by the global work force, but remain distinctly local.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$19,910

Martinez-Reyes, Jose Eduardo

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Massachusetts, Boston, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2013
Project Title: 
Martinez-Reyes, Dr. Jose Eduardo, U. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA - To aid research on 'Mahogany Intertwined: Enviromateriality Between the Maya Forest, Fiji, and the Gibson Les Paul'

Preliminary abstract: This project will produce a global ethnography that engages both, the material culture and materiality of Honduran mahogany (Sw. macrophylla), along with a global political ecology of forest conservation. It seeks to understand the complex dynamics between people and mahogany by tracing human-nature relations through the global commodity networks by focusing on one particular artefact, the Gibson Les Paul, an iconic solid wood electric guitar made of mahogany. In recent years, Gibson has been supplied with 'sustainably certified' mahogany by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) grown in the Maya Forest of Quintana Roo, Mexico and more recently in Fiji (whose mahogany was transplanted when a British colony). On the production (material) side, I ask questions to local communities about how they relate to the material in question and more importantly, whether FSC certified mahogany helps create sustainability and community well-being within a neoliberal framework as it proclaims. I also seek to unravel the power relations of mahogany production within Mexico's and Fiji's particular land tenure systems. On the consumption (materiality) end, I will interview Gibson Les Paul builders and players about why they consider mahogany to have sonic and tonal agentic force (which I call 'sonicality') that they seek when building and when playing the guitar. I also interrogate what role does mahogany play in driving the Les Paul's supply and demand, and if such drives contributes to the demise of mahogany and the efforts of agro-forestry as a sustainable conservation practice. From a UMass Boston grant I was able to conduct research in Mexico in 2011-12. In this proposal I seek funding to carry out fieldwork in Viti Levu, Fiji for a total of 12 weeks in 2013-14 and travel to Nashville, TN to the Gibson Factory in the Spring of 2013 to carry out interviews and ethnographic observations

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$19,450

Stefanoff, Lisa B.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 8, 2003
Project Title: 
Stefanoff, Lisa B., New York U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'From Voice to Property: The Social Practices of Indigenous Media Production at C.A.A.M.A,' supervised by Dr. Fred R. Myers

LISA B. STEFANOFF, then a student at New York University, New York, New York, received funding in January 2003 to aid research on 'From Voice to Property: The Social Practices of Indigenous Media Production at CAAMA,' supervised by Dr. Fred R. Myers. The research details the production of audio-visual 'Aboriginal Media for the World' by culturally diverse teams supported by the Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA) at the start of the 21st century. Field and media-archival research investigated the meanings and values, for a variety of CAAMA film-makers, of the collective enterprise of 'storytelling.' The project traced individuals' identifications with CAAMA's encompassing corporate invocation to 'See the World Through Aboriginal Eyes.' Located in intersecting fields of cultural production -- Central Australian desert culture, Aboriginal national politics, Australian culture and arts bureaucracies, the community broadcasting mediascape, Australian/Indigenous artworlds, and the Australian screen industry -- six CAAMA documentaries, fiction films, and television community service announcements are examined as forms of material culture with alienable and inalienable property values. As sites and symbols of intercultural exchange that have been key to the construction of new Indigenous identities, CAAMA screen works mediate motivating experiences and anxieties about cultural loss. Drawing on participant observation of these processes and in-depth interviews with key creators, the study describes the creation of these works from pre-production to distribution. It illustrates how CAAMA's screen work achieves market values as Indigenous expression by only by mediating colliding cultural interests, contradictory creative impulses, and unanticipated constraints.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$9,784

Bashkow, Ira R.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Virginia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 8, 2001
Project Title: 
Bashkow, Dr. Ira R., U. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA - To aid research and writing on ''Whitemen' in the Moral World of Orokaiva of Papua New Guinea' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. IRA R. BASHKOW, of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia, was awarded a Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship in June 2001 to aid research and writing of a book entitled The Meaning of Whitemen: Race and Modernity in Papua New Guinea. The book is a theoretically focused ethnography of an Orokaiva community in Papua New Guinea that examines how Orokaiva people conceptualize 'whitemen,' development, and the West. In it Bashkow explores the racial symbolism that is central to Orokaiva ideas of modernity and provides an unprecedented account of the cultural construction of 'whiteness' and race in a non-Western culture. He shows how Orokaiva use the symbolism of 'whitemen' to interpret the position of their local communities and their race in the world economy. Recognizing that modernity is an essentially racial concept for Orokaiva is the key to understanding modernity's power to insinuate itself into their local cultural processes and tap into dynamics of their local moral order, so that even these people, whose historical experience of modernity has been so unrewarding, still ardently desire to reforge their society in the image of the modern other. Growing out of the writing of the book was a related article on the globalization of time, in which Bashkow examined how the Orokaiva cultural construction of whitemen was substantiated in people's use of 'whitemen's time,' meaning, in Orokaiva terms, the synchronization of different people's activities using modem, Western-style clock and calendrical time. The ethnography of whitemen's time supports a general theoretical argument about the way in which non-Western time systems change (and are resilient) in the face of globalization.

Publication Credit:

Bashkow, Ira. 2006. The Meaning of Whitemen: Race and Modernity in the Orokaiva Cultural World. University of Chicago Press: Chicago and London.

Dobrin, Lise M., and Ira Bashkow. 2010. 'Arapesh Warfare': Reo Fortune's Veiled Critique of Margaret Mead's Sex and Temperment. American Anthropologist 112(3):370-383.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Hardin, Jessica Anne

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Brandeis U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 5, 2011
Project Title: 
Hardin, Jessica Anne, Brandeis U., Waltham, MA - To aid research on 'Exchange and Health: Negotiating the Meaning of Food and Body among Evangelical Christians in Independent Samoa,' supervised by Dr. Richard J. Parmentier

JESSICA A. HARDIN, then a student at Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, received funding in October 2011 to aid research on 'Exchange and Health: Negotiating the Meaning of Food and Body among Evangelical Christians in Independent Samoa,' supervised by Dr. Richard J. Parmentier. In a 'traditional' Samoan idiom, large body size indexed deep social networks and prosperity. Today, as rates of weight-related diseases and obesity increase, meanings of the large body are in flux. Exchange is increasingly critiqued by public health and evangelical Christians as a source of financial, social, and emotional hardship that causes weight-related disorders. This research explores how weight-related disorders are constructed as a problem of inequality and social change related to global influences on everyday life. This analysis draws from fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork that included participant observation, semi-structured interviews and discourse analysis in two evangelical churches and public health domains in the urban and peri-urban areas of Apia. These diverse data sets enabled an investigation of how: weight-related disorders are linked to exchange; spiritualized etiologies encourage social and embodied change; and global public health discourses are articulated in complex and surprising ways. This research into responses to the rise of weight-related disorders illuminates the social and spiritual dimensions shaping disease management in contemporary Samoa; this suggests a focus on well-being, as opposed to health, in prevention and policy is necessary.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$12,400

Mawyer, Alexander D.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 4, 2001
Project Title: 
Mawyer, Alexander D., U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Processes of Media Receptivity and the Production of Identities in the Gambier Islands, French Polynesia' supervised by Dr. John D. Kelly

ALEXANDER D. MAWYER, while a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in December 2001 to aid research on 'Processes of Media Receptivity and the Production of Identities in the Gambier Islands, French Polynesia,' supervised by Dr. John D. Kelly. Between January 2002 and February 2003, the grantee conducted primary dissertation fieldwork in French Polynesia for a project titled 'TV TALK and Other Processes of Media Receptivity and the Production of Identities in the Gambier, French Polynesia.' The theoretical focus of this project remained centered, throughout the fieldwork, in the investigation of particular affinities between the use of available sociolinguistic tools, the interactional stances taken by speakers in the various discursive situations of daily life, and the production of groupness-higher orders of social organization such as publics or communities. During the course of fieldwork, the grantee investigated how it is that speakers do inhabit roles and identities, and generally perform the great play of culture in all its modes and moods, in the indexical realization of the universe of their discourse - resulting in observations of speakers shifting between multiple possible stances, identifying with a public or publics within French Polynesia. A significant methodological goal of this project was to show how culturally situated persons in a sense improvisationally perform and generate the very publics that constitute them, a process which is in part realized by various linguistic devices that simultaneously index and entail that performance. From examining such 'realizations' in the discursive negotiation of the meaningfulness of news and other culturally mediating tropes - in this case, Mexican soap operas, a metropolitan French talk show, and ongoing local political debates articulated with pearl legislation and the French Polynesian government's regional objectives-1 gained an analytical purchase on the cultural and social logics of 'significant' information and the role(s) of communication more generally, in village society.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$2,300

Sweetman, Lauren Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Sweetman, Lauren Elizabeth, New York U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'Healing Maori(ness): Music, Politics, and Forensic Mental Health,' supervised by Dr. David Samuels

LAUREN E. SWEETMAN, then a graduate student at New York University, New York, New York, received a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'Healing Maori(ness): Music, Politics, and Forensic Mental Health,' supervised by Dr. David Samuels. During the tenure of this award, the grantee completed fourteen months of ethnographic, community-engaged field research in Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand. Research focused primarily on the Mason Clinic's Te Papak?inga O T?ne Whakapiripiri unit, a secure forensic psychiatric facility for criminal offenders with mental health issues. Run 'by M?ori for M?ori,' this unit offers an explicitly indigenous paradigm of healing that marries Western clinical frameworks with intensive cultural programming, where music, spirituality, and language are utilized as integral aspects of treatment. Here, the grantee worked intensively alongside the cultural team as they implemented their programming, participating in the programming as well as the daily life of the unit, and monitoring the experiences of the patients as they advanced in their rehabilitation. Overall, approximately 100 interviews were conducted with participants representing the various stakeholders in this project: patients, cultural advisors and elders, psychiatrists, psychologists, consumer advocates, occupational therapists, social workers, and all levels of management; as well as experts with relevant experience in the fields of criminal justice, health, and M?ori culture. All interviews were designed and implemented in collaboration with the Taumata (cultural advisory board) at Mason Clinic, a partnership that will continue in all subsequent stages of this project.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Belharte, Stefanie Anja

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 29, 2007
Project Title: 
Belharte, Dr. Stefanie Anja, Independent Scholar, Canterbury, UK - To aid research and writing on 'Agroforestry and Agrocentrism: Tropical Land Use as a Test-Bed for Conventional Concepts of Human-Environment Relations' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. STEFANIE BELHARTE, Independent Scholar, Canterbury, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Fellowship in October 2007, to aid research and writing on 'Agroforestry and Agrocentrism: Tropical Land Use and a Test-Bed for Conventional Concepts of Human-Environment Relations.' The manuscript looks at the question 'Why cultivate?' from an ecological angle, focusing on tropical subsistence strategies, in particular in Southeast Asia and Oceania. A comparative literature review suggests that the strategies recognized as 'rainforest foraging,' 'sago subsistence', 'agroforestry,' and 'swiddening (shifting cultivation)' are all based on a sequence of vegetational disturbance and subsequent regrowth; that this sequence is variously manipulated through human labor in two dimensions: the degree of regrowth management (clearing, weeding, planting) and the length of the regrowth/cropping period (annual/perennial resources); and that the various expressions of these two dimensions in contemporary forms and their evolutionary antecedents represent the branches of an evolutionary tree. Supported by a case study from lowland New Guinea, it also indicates a trend towards increasing modification, substitution, and curtailment of the regrowth. An explanation for this trend may lie in the co-evolutionary relationships between resources and their human users. Dependent on resource characteristics, these relationships generate a variously forceful self-amplifying dynamic, which draws resource users towards cultivation, and can thus via the management of woody perennials arrive at contemporary swidden vegeculture.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Haug, Jordan Ross

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Diego, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 10, 2014
Project Title: 
Haug, Jordan Ross, U. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA - To aid research on 'Finding Hope in a Time of Decline: After Mine Closure in Misima, Papua New Guinea,' supervised by Dr. Rupert Stasch

Preliminary abstract: In places where extractive industries have left an indelible mark, eroding infrastructures and disappearing economic opportunities following project closures often contribute to crises of hope. Hope for future equality with people in wealthier parts of the world seems no longer practical. Through ethnographic research in Misima, Papua New Guinea, this project seeks to answer the pressing question of how people in these communities hope for greater equality in times of dramatic geopolitical and economic decline. In 2004, the small island of Misima became the site of one of the most significant industrial mine closures in Oceania. Since that time, the possibilities for the island's geopolitical, infrastructural, and economic advancement have dramatically declined. In spite of this foreclosure of opportunity and increased isolation, many Misimans hope for better futures where they are able to obtain geopolitical, infrastructural, and economic equality with the rest of the globalized world. Through moral projects like education, cooperative fund raising, and denominationalism, Misimans infuse presently persistent inequalities with the possibility of greater equality. I hypothesize that these moral projects of cultivating hope subvert the inevitability of inequality in favor of egalitarian ideals that transcend the realm of the possible.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$19,996
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