Lee, Tina Marie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Graduate Center, City U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Lee, Tina Marie, CUNY-Graduate Center, New York, NY - To aid research on 'Stratified Reproduction and Definitions of Child Neglect: State Practices and Parents' Response,' supervised by Dr. Leith Mullings

DR. JENNIFER HASTY, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Washington, received funding in May 2004 to aid research on 'Corruption and the Politics of Indigeneity in Ghana.' From July 2004 to August 2005, the grantee conducted twelve months of fieldwork on corruption and anticorruption in Ghana. While the anticorruption programs of international donors and NGOs diagnose corruption as a problem of selfish greed and cynicism, this research supports the argument that the practices of corruption are deeply rooted in notions of indigenous African identity, sociality, and global positionality. Archival work on anticolonial newspapers and postcolonial Commissions of Enquiry illustrates how the Ghanaian sense of indigeneity was key to the crafting of resistance to colonial forms of expropriation, as well as the Africanization of the nation-state, and, more recently, neoliberal participation in global processes (both fueling and fighting corruption). If historical and sociocultural factors are key to the endurance of corruption, then solutions to the problem of corruption must engage with the sociocultural dynamics at work, rather than criminalize the 'temptations' of sociality and local culture (gift-giving, favors, nepotism), as donor anticorruption often do. In six months of participant-observation, working as an assistant to a corruption investigator at the Ghana Serious Fraud Office, the grantee studied how the work of anticorruption is infused with socially-embedded forms of morality, often inspired by local Christianity (as opposed to the secularist and individualist discourses of donors).

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$23,302

Ganapathy, Sandhya

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Temple U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 10, 2004
Project Title: 
Ganapathy, Sandhya, Temple U., Philadelphia, PA - To aid research on 'The Intersections Between Indigenous Rights and Environmental Movements,' supervised by Dr. Judith Goode

SANDHYA GANAPATHY, then a student at Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, received funding in December 2004 to aid research on 'The Intersections Between Indigenous Rights and Environmental Movements,' supervised by Dr. Judith Goode. This research examines the environmental mobilizations to prevent oil development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and the ways in which the Native Alaskan community of Vahsraii' Koo is positioned within these mobilizations. Fieldwork was conducted in Vashraii' Koo, Alaska and with environmental NGOs operating in Fairbanks, AK and Washington, DC, and consisted of ethnographic interviews and participant observation, archival research on federal and state Native policies and environmental policies and media analysis on the representations of this environmental controversy and Native opposition to development. The research describes the ways in which people in Vashraii' Koo articulate and frame environmental concerns and their experiences of this broader environmental mobilization. The research also describes the work of environmental NGOs active in these mobilizations and shows how political contexts and constituencies influence the ways they operate and how they attempt to incorporate Native perspectives within their work. This research suggests that there is a disconnect between the interests of the NGOs and the Native communities represented as their allies; specifically, the singular emphasis on narrowly defined environmental goals marginalizes Native voices and diverts attention from other pressing political, economic and cultural concerns in Vashraii' Koo.

Publication Credit:

Ganapathy Sandhya. 2013. Imagining Alaska: Local and Translocal Engagements with Place. American Anthropologist 115(1):96-111

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$20,783

Abadie, Roberto

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 15, 2008
Project Title: 
Abadie, Dr. Roberto, Independent Scholar, Montevideo, Uruguay - To aid research and writing on 'A Guinea Pig's Wage: Risk, Body Commodification, and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Research in America' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. ROBERTO ABADIA, an independent scholar in Montevideo, Uruguay, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in October 2008 to aid research and writing on 'The Professional Guinea Pig: Big Pharma and the Risky World of Human Subjects.' An ethnographic study of the participation of paid subjects in Phase I clinical trials in Philadelphia, this book examines a group of self-defined professional 'guinea pigs' who earn their livelihoods as research subjects testing drugs being developed by the pharmaceutical industry. Abadia describes not only participants' experiences and motivations as they volunteer but also the role of financial compensation in the social organization of clinical trials and its effects on the ethical arrangements designed to protect human subjects. Findings suggest that continuous participation-experienced subjects may perform more than sixty trials over a few years-exposed subjects to risks they might be unable or unwilling to recognize. The grantee shows how the prospects of financial gain predisposed subjects to neglect risks of synergistic drug interactions derived from their continuous participation. These risks are also neglected by a pharmaceutical industry that depends on the routine participation of professional subjects. And while paid subjects perceived certain trials, like those involving psychiatric or genetic drugs, to be especially dangerous, financial incentives still led them to volunteer. He argues that while today's paid subjects seem to be more informed about risks than previous populations, their participation in trials research still poses ethical questions. Financial compensation creates a new type of market-captive population whose ability to consent is jeopardized by financial inducements. This situation challenges the basic ethical assumptions that guide current Institutional Review Boards (IRBs).

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Shear, Boone Wingate

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Massachusetts, Amherst, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2011
Project Title: 
Shear, Boone Wingate, U. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA - To aid research on 'Making the Green Economy: Culture, Politics and Economic Desire in Massachusetts,' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth Krause

BOONE W. SHEAR, then a student at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, was awarded a grant in April 2011 to aid research on 'Making the Green Economy: Culture, Politics, and Economic Desire in Massachusetts,' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth L. Krause. The fieldwork explored how groups of activists are imagining, responding to, and enacting the economy in relation to green economy discourse in Massachusetts. In particular, the project investigated economic subjectivity among green economy coalition members, focusing on the conditions under which both capitalist and non-capitalist desires and practices emerge. This engaged research project combined participant observation while working alongside activists and organizers, with semi-structured and informal interviews in order to better understand how different economic dispositions and desires emerge, are closed-off, or are enacted. The research revealed that interest in economic innovation, experimentation, and organizing around alternative economic projects -- what Gibson-Graham and others have described as 'non-capitalism' -- appears to be increasing among green coalition members. Though preliminary research suggests that discursive interventions can lead to new economic identities and desires, the research also shows that a politics of non-capitalist possibility might also be able to utilize capitalist and anti-capitalist desires in the construction of on-the-ground non-capitalist enterprises and relations. More broadly, this research intends to expand understandings around the complex relationship between structure, subjectivity, and agency.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$19,980

Malone, Molly Sue

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
British Columbia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 21, 2009
Project Title: 
Malone, Molly Sue, U. of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada - To aid research on 'Living on the Skagit River: Native American Historical Consciousness and Relationships with the Aquatic Environment,' supervised by Dr. Bruce Granville Miller

MOLLY SUE MALONE, then a student at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, was awarded a grant in October 2009, to aid research on 'Living on the Skagit River: Native American Historical Consciousness and Relationships with the Aquatic Environment,' supervised by Dr. Bruce Granville Miller. This research examines Upper Skagit Indian Tribe members' historical consciousness of their families' settlement patterns and fishing practices in the Skagit River watershed over the past two hundred years, and ,asks what this consciousness reveals about how contemporary Native American relationships to land and water are shaped by colonial processes of land alienation and subsequent struggles for tribal recognition and access to aboriginal territory. Data was collected over a twelve-month period using three overlapping methods of inquiry: the collection of oral narratives with contemporary Upper Skagit people, participant observation within the Upper Skagit community, and archival work with documents pertaining to the post-contact history of the Skagit River valley as well as field notes and oral narrative transcriptions collected by earlier anthropologists working among the Upper Skagit throughout the 20th century. The data is compiled into family settlement narratives and an overall tribal narrative for the purpose of evaluating the various levels of historical consciousness pertaining to colonial impacts on the watershed .

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,590

Grewal, Zareena A.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Yale U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2015
Project Title: 
Grewal, Dr. Zareena A., Yale U., New Haven, CT - To aid research on 'Is the Quran a Good Book? Tolerance and the Muslim Question in the US'

Preliminary abstract: Is the Quran a 'good book'? Tracking the social life of the Quran as an American cultural object deepens our understanding of the complexity and diversity of Americans' political and cultural interests in Islam over time. By analyzing a wide range of official, media, artistic, pedagogical, and ritual practices around the Islamic text-object in the US, we learn not only about American views of Islam but also about Americans' anxieties about the liberal doctrine of tolerance. Contemporary debates about Islam and tolerance are generally organized around two sets of questions: (1) how much should 'we' tolerate Muslims in the US and (2) how should the US government make tolerant Muslim societies abroad? In regard to the first question, how American Muslims read the Quran figures centrally in arguments over the extent they should be tolerated and protected as a minority. The policing of 'good' and 'bad' reading and interpretive practices profoundly impact American Muslims. The second, related question of teaching Muslims abroad tolerance manifests in state projects aimed at nurturing the same 'good' Quranic reading and interpretive practices. I will map out the contours of these national debates about the nature (and limits of) religious tolerance inspired by the Quran.      

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Bowman, Chellie Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New School U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Bowman, Chelle Elizabeth, New School U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'Experimental Collaborations: How Birdsong is Reassembling the Human,' supervised by Dr. Lawrence Hirschfeld

Preliminary abstract: This research looks to examine how birdsong is redefining relationships between humans and nonhumans within amateur and expert communities in the United States. Due to technological advances in recent decades, birdsong has become an important, yet controversial object of a broad range of scientific inquiry, in particular as a potential model for human speech acquisition. This shift coincides with evidence from ethological and neurobiological research that has contributed to a changing cognitive profile of birds that challenges primate biases for interspecies comparison. These findings align with knowledge practices in birding communities where birders intimately entangle their lives with birds and their songs, training their ears and bodies to get close to them. Ironically, it is in appreciating and working to understand bodily difference that these two communities have been able to recognize analogous cognitive processes and likenesses between birds and humans, dismantling intelligence hierarchies. This project will investigate innovate comparative practices at two key birdsong labs at the University of Chicago and Cornell University, as well as field practices in vibrant birding communities along the Atlantic and Mississippi migration flyways. How do these communities and their alternative practices offer insight into new ways of relating to and co-existing with other species?

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$19,975

Sufrin, Carolyn Beth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Francisco, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2012
Project Title: 
Sufrin, Carolyn Beth, U. of California, San Francisco, CA - To aid research on 'Negotiating 'Serious Medical Needs:' Medical Care, Carcerality, and Health Rights in a U.S. Women's Jail,' supervised by Dr. Vincanne Adams

CAROLYN B. SUFRIN, then a student at University of California, San Francisco, California, received funding in April 2012 to aid research on 'Negotiating 'Serious Medical Needs:' Medical Care, Carcerality, and Health Rights in a U.S. Women's Jail,' supervised by Dr. Vincanne Adams. This study investigated the everyday contours of care in an urban women's jail in northern California. At a time when structures of inequality are perpetuated by a retracted public safety net and an expanded incarceration system, it is notable that prisoners have a constitutional right to receive medical care. To explore the realities of this health care mandate, ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in a jail clinic, housing units, and surrounding community, with supplemental insights gained from the ethnographer's own experience as a practicing physician at the fieldsite. Unexpected relationships of care arose between incarcerated women, medical staff, and deputies; harsh discipline and compassionate care were inextricably linked in these forms of care. Reproduction was a key site where the deficiencies of public services and their substitution with incarceration were made visible. As pregnant women were nurtured and punished in the carceral environment, jail became a tragically desired and comforting place for some of them to inhabit. Their childbirth and motherhood were marked by further institutionalization, cycling through drug treatment programs and back to jail, making sites of care and confinement indistinguishable. Particularly for marginalized, reproducing women, jail has become an integral part of society's social and medical safety net.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$21,870

Morgen, Sandra L.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oregon, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 10, 2007
Project Title: 
Morgen, Dr. Sandra L., University of Oregon, Eugene, OR - To aid research on 'Producing and Contesting Consent: The Cultural Politics of Taxes and the Imagined Neoliberal State'

DR. SANDRA L. MORGEN., University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, received a grant in April 2007, to aid research on 'Producing and Contesting Consent: The Cultural Politics of Taxes and the Imagined Neoliberal State'Examining the cultural politics of taxes sheds light on how U.S. citizens understand and differently value the State -- i.e., the institutions, policies, and people that constitute 'government.' This research focused on tax politics 'on the ground' in Pennsylvania and Oregon, using the tools of participant-observation, qualitative interviews, and analysis of documents developed by 'anti-tax' or 'tax fairness' groups. The researchers studied tax-related ballot initiative campaigns in Oregon (2006-2010), local 'property tax relief' elections in Pennsylvania in 2007, and the activities of the Tea Party movement in Oregon in 2009. Analysis of these campaigns reveals how competing ideologies of the State are represented in and produced by public contestations over tax policy. The research suggests that the process of 'deKeynesianization' -- the neoliberal political project of challenging the Keynesian welfare state and winning the consent of the public for neoliberalization in the forms of scaling back safety-net programs, creating a leaner, 'corporatized' public sector, and expanding privatization -- has been effectively, but incompletely, produced by anti-tax organizations. However, 'tax fairness' ideologies, support for some government programs, and a continuing sense of social responsibility still mobilize voters, reflecting the deep political divisions about government that remain unsettled in U.S. political culture.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$20,685

Helmreich, Stefan Gordon

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 2, 2003
Project Title: 
Helmreich, Dr. Stefan, New York U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'Recasting the Nature and Properties of the Sea in the Genomic Age'

DR. STEFAN HELMREICH, of New York University in New York, New York, received funding in January 2003 to aid ethnographic research on the ways in which scientific representations of the sea have been changing in the genomic age. Helmreich worked at two marine biological research sites: the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in California and the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. He discovered that as oceanographers turned from mapping the seafloor to mapping the genes of marine creatures, they were offering new accounts of the nature of the sea as a network of marine genes linked to the 'life-support system' of the biosphere. Developing environmental genomics-DNA sequencing not of organisms but of whole ecologies-scientists in Monterey imagined Earth's ocean as an entity with its own genome, its own 'life,' largely microbial. Meanwhile, in Hawaii, where some marine biologists looked to the sea for resources for biotechnology, the discovery of novel gene sequences had awakened debates about ownership in the ocean. Native Hawaiians were contesting biotechnological uses of resources from archipelagic waters. Marine biotechnologists (overwhelmingly not Native) were uneasy with Native rights claims, countering that the register in which they sampled (microscopic, microbial, molecular) could not have been anticipated by constitutional safeguarding of resources for Native peoples. A traditional subject matter of maritime anthropology-how people adjudicate property claims in aquatic resources-found new articulation here in languages of biotechnology, biodiversity, and bioprospecting. Helmreich suggested that marine genomics was transforming the way scientists understood the nature of the ocean, repositioning, too, the terms in which property in marine resources might be imagined as the biotechnological age goes to sea.

Publication Credit:

Helmreich, Stefan. 2005. How Scientists Think; About 'Natives,' for Example. A Problem of Taxonomy among Biologists of Alien Species in Hawaii. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 11(1):107-128.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$24,976
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