Glenn-Levin, Naomi Jessica

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Cruz, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2010
Project Title: 
Glenn-Levin, Naomi Jessica, U. of California, Santa Cruz, CA - To aid research on 'Translating Care: Foster Placements and Bureaucratic Collaborations,' supervised by Dr. Donald Lawrence Brenneis

NAOMI GLENN-LEVIN, then a student at University of California, Santa Cruz, California, was awarded funding in May 2010 to aid research on 'Translating Care: Foster Placements and Bureaucratic Collaborations,' supervised by Dr. Donald L. Brenneis. This project, based on twelve months of ethnographic research, examines the entanglement of transnational families with the U.S. child welfare system at the U.S.-México border. It examines decisions made about child removal and custody, asking how structures of race, citizenship, and nationality inform determinations about proper parents, ideal homes, and state responsibility for minor citizens. This research contends that the lack of communication between two legal systems -- dependency law, which governs child welfare, and immigration law -- creates a situation where families entangled simultaneously in both systems are subject to the translation of immigration policies into categories of neglect and abuse employed by child welfare authorities. This research asks, what sorts of translations occur that remake immigration actions == such as detention and deportation -- into instances of 'bad' parenting? How do child welfare's categories lead to the termination of parental rights despite international laws protecting children's and family's rights? This project presents an analysis of the structural violence inflicted on families at the intersection of immigration law and child welfare policy. It considers the family as a locus for interrogating notions of citizenship and the state, and a crucial site where ideals of belonging and exclusion are produced and reinforced.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$19,989

O'Neill, Colleen

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Utah State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2006
Project Title: 
O'Neill, Dr. Colleen M., Utah State U., Logan, UT - To aid conference on 'Indians, Labor, and Capitalist Culture: A colloquium of historians, ethnohistorians and anthropologists,' 2006, Newberry Library, in collaboration with Dr. Brian C. Hosmer

'Indians, Labor and Capitalist Culture: A Colloquium of Historians, Ethnohistorians and Anthropologists.' September 22-23, 2006, Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois. Organizers: Colleen O'Neill (Utah State University, Logan, Utah), Alexandra Harmon (University of Washington, Seattle, Washington), and Brian C. Hosmer (Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois). A body of scholarship has emerged during the last decade that significantly complicates and enhances our understanding of American Indians' history and its relation to economic development in the United States. The new scholarship features American Indians as workers, producers, entrepreneurs, and sophisticated economic analysts. They are historical actors whose stories challenge the intellectual paradigms that have segregated the study of Indians from the history of US economic culture. Such a complex portrait of American Indian history may also call into question some fundamental assumptions about the nature of 'modernity.' This two-day meeting at the Newberry Library was convened on September 22, 2006, to provide a more organized conversation of scholars engaged in this cutting-edge research. Anthropologists, American historians and Specialists in Native American Studies, gathered to discuss questions of mutual interest: how the incorporation of American Indian land and economies has impacted the development of the U.S. economy, what it has indicated about and meant for American economic culture, how Indians have engaged the market economy, how Indians have managed and understood their economic strategies since their subordination to US power, how Indians' strategies have affected their status and images in American society, and more. Such interdisciplinary dialogue provided important groundwork for further collaborative research.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$5,515

Hare, Elizabeth Maree

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Cruz, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Hare, Elizabeth Maree, U. of California, Santa Cruz, CA - To aid research on 'Haunting the Future: Tracing the Production of Climate Forecast Models,' supervised by Dr. Andrew S. Mathews

Preliminary abstract: This project aims to further understanding of climate science through an ethnographic investigation of the development of a regional forecast model. I will conduct one year of fieldwork among an interdisciplinary network of climate scientists who are working to strengthen the validity of simulation models using high-resolution paleoecological data. This fieldwork will allow me to follow the process of developing a model, including both the material practices and the experiential and embodied knowledge that are necessary for successfully translating a landscape into computer code. This research will be attentive to political concerns as a part of the knowledge making process, rather than assume they are corruptive. The resulting ethnography will strengthen the claims of mainstream climate science by showing how it works to produce robust information through the interface of scientific objects, models, and political concern.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$17,024

Bidwell Pearce, Alison B.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Stanford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 28, 2001
Project Title: 
Bidwell, Alison B., Stanford U., Stanford, CA - To aid research on 'Historical Ecology of Cooperation in a North American Ranching Community,' supervised by Dr. William H. Durham

ALISON B. BIDWELL, while a student at Stanford University in Stanford, California, received a grant in June 2001 to aid research on the historical ecology of cooperation in a North American ranching community, under the supervision of Dr. William H. Durham. Bidwell conducted thirteen months of fieldwork in the Madison Valley of southwestern Montana in order to write an ecologically oriented ethnography of family ranchers. She employed a variety of field methods including historical research, interviews, and observations. Historical documents were collected from historical societies, university libraries, and public agencies in order to reconstruct the 150-year evolution of the local ranching economy. A comprehensive database of land patents for the study area was collected from the General Land Office records held by the Bureau of Land Management. A second database of property subdivisions was collected from the Madison County courthouse. These data were to be analyzed with Geographical Information Systems software in order to examine the relationship between land tenure patterns and natural resource distribution. Bidwell also collected detailed labor activity diaries from thirteen ranching households in order to quantify their reliance on family labor, describe the seasonal round of work, and understand strategies for coping with economic volatility. She interviewed a larger population of ranchers in order to explore the criteria employed in land-use decisions, particularly with regard to subdivision and land conservation. Finally, she conducted interviews and made observations among two types of rancher organizations-grazing associations that jointly lease Forest Service land and a nonprofit organization dedicated to maintaining the ranching lifestyle in the area. These interviews and observations were aimed at comparing the cooperation exhibited by ranchers in these groups with theoretical models of common-pool resource institutions.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$19,150

Powell, James V.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
British Columbia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 24, 2003
Project Title: 
Powell, James V., U. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC - To aid preparation of personal research materials and accompanying photographic collection of Vickie Jensen for archival deposit with the Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver, BC
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$14,007

Jabloner, Anna

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 5, 2011
Project Title: 
Jabloner, Anna, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Archiving Humanity: The Politics of Classification in U.S. Gene Databases,' supervised by Dr. Joseph Masco

ANNA JABLONER, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in October 2011 to aid research on 'Archiving Humanity: The Politics of Classification in U.S. Gene Databases,' supervised by Dr. Joseph Masco. From within a frontier scientific culture in northern California, this project examines how Americans deploy genomic information to organize their lives in the early 21st century -- in terms of identity, health, and futures framed through risk. As private and public genetic databases are growing, data-oriented genomics promises the transition of medical and criminological practices into more rational and predictive forms. This project investigates the uses of human genetic databases by looking at their applications in genetic counseling and in court cases in California. Focusing on the everyday uses of genetic databases, it examines genetic counseling as a rapidly growing domain in which data is being interpreted and communicated to medical patients and the consumers of health genomics products. Through ethnographic research, the project asks how genetic counseling practices mobilize genomic information and carve out new claims to direct life courses. As genomic data is communicated to non-scientists invested in health, kinship, and biological and cultural connections, possible meanings of healthy or risky futures are re-made in and through classificatory practices. The project investigates how growing genomic infrastructures and a new genomic governance, which emerges alongside them, variably implicate subjects and their risky or healthy life courses in genetic databases.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Callahan-Kapoor, Celina Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Cruz, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 12, 2011
Project Title: 
Callahan-Kapoor, Celina Elizabeth, U. of California, Santa Cruz, CA - To aid research on 'Reshaping Expert Knowledge and/in Everyday Life: Type-2 Diabetes in McAllen, Texas,' supervised by Dr. Matthew Wolf-Meyer

CELINA E. CALLAHAN-KAPOOR, then a student at University of California, Santa Cruz, California, received funding in October 2011 to aid research on 'Reshaping Expert Knowledge and/in Everyday Life: Type-2 Diabetes in McAllen, Texas,' supervised by Dr. Matthew Wolf-Meyer. This project, based on fifteen months of ethnographic research, examined the social, economic, and political relationships surrounding diabetes in Texas' Rio Grande Valley, a U.S./Mexico borderlands region where diabetes has been diagnosed in 30-50 percent of the population. The grantee conducted interviews and participant observation with patients and their families, healthcare providers, and others, and analyzed the mediatization of diabetes in news, films, and educational pamphlets. Rather than situate diabetes as originally biological, this project historicizes the illness as a key node in the contemporary organization of sociopolitical and economic relationships based in capitalist ideologies of excess, abandonment, and desire. As such, this project argues that diabetes has multiple valences: it is a site for biomedical intervention, a complicated form of regional identification, and enacted in intimate forms of labor. These valences in turn produce and maintain diabetes-based publics embedded in longstanding socioeconomic and political segregation. The grantee argues that these publics are maintained through the ritualized, day-to-day cultivation of certain bodies as diabetic and spatially and temporally chaotic; others as diabetic and 'well-controlled;' and others as educated, different, and elite. Thus, rather than forming one public joined in conversation about diabetes, the research found the formation of multiple diabetes-based publics.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$24,627

Sawyer, Kelley Paulette

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New Mexico, Albuquerque, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 13, 2010
Project Title: 
Sawyer, Kelley Paulette, U. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM - To aid research on 'Philadelphia's Story: Gay Tourism and Shifting Citizenry in the Nation's 'Freedom Capital',' supervised by Dr. Louise Lamphere

Preliminary abstract: In 2003, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania -- arguably one of the most symbolically rich sites of American history and national mythology -- launched a state-supported gay tourism campaign entitled 'Get Your History Straight and Your Nightlife Gay.' With the initiation of this campaign, Philadelphia joined a handful of other North American and Western European cities that had recently begun to court gay and lesbian tourists, and to re-envision themselves as diverse, cosmopolitan, and 'gay-friendly' destinations. Philadelphia's utilization of canonized national history in order to render itself 'America's freedom capital' and 'the city that has embraced 'Gay-Friendly' as its credo' for this campaign suggests that in this context, questions of 'difference,' inclusion, and nation are mediated through the market. When contextualized within the new millennium, a time marked by urgent reconsolidations of U.S. nation and citizenship, this campaign emerges as a timely site for investigating the types of 'diversity' that are currently desirable and undesirable for inclusion within the nation, the city, and particular neighborhoods. This project seeks to trace the deployments of 'difference' and appeals to inclusion in the context of Philadelphia, paying most attention to the interface between the discursive appeals of its tourism campaign and the perceptions, experiences, and networks of individuals who live, work, relax in, and visit the urban spaces it advertises, such as Philadelphia's 'Gayborhood.' I propose to conduct an ethnographic study of Philadelphia's gay tourism campaign, in which I ask how residents, campaign visionaries, business owners, tourism employees, and visitors interpret and interact with the campaign's discursive promises and how they conceptualize 'their people.'

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$19,967

Kim, Jaymelee Jane

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Tennessee, Knoxville, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2013
Project Title: 
Kim, Jaymelee Jane, U. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN - To aid research on 'Transitional Justice in a Non-Transitioning Society: Perceived Efficacy of Canada's Justice and Reconciliation Efforts,' supervised by Dr. Tricia Redeker-Hepner

Preliminary abstract: This study is an ethnographic analysis of the application of transitional justice method and theory in Canada, a country that is not undergoing political transition (i.e. from Euro-Canadian governance to Indigenous governance). From 1874-1996, Indigenous people of Canada suffered forced assimilation, sexual abuse, and physical abuse in government and church administrated boarding schools; the Canadian government began to actively address these crimes in 2006 with the negotiation of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement. The agreement outlines transitional justice mechanisms typically employed in countries undergoing a political regime change in which the once oppressed have gained political power. Using transitional justice theory and based on data gathered from Vancouver, British Columbia and the lower mainland, the research presented here focuses on the similarities and differences in goals, perceptions of transitional justice efficacy, and the relationship between past and current human rights grievances of Indigenous people. The findings of this project will contribute to critical anthropological dialogue concerning the meaning of justice and reconciliation, specifically in a non-transitioning society that operates with a legacy of institutionalized discrimination and persistent colonization. The research will illuminate how human rights discourse is interpreted by government officials, Indigenous peoples, and transitional justice facilitators.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$20,000