Verinis, James Peter

Grant Type: 
Engaged Anthropology Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Roger Williams U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
August 26, 2015
Project Title: 
Verinis, Dr. James, Roger Williams U., Bristol, RI - To aid engaged activities on 'Rural Greek Rebound in/of Crisis,' 2016, Greece

Preliminary abstract: Rural areas all over the world are now important sites where the predicaments and opportunities of globalization are unfolding. In rural Greece entrepreneurship is reinterpreted in light of global migrations and economic austerity. Notably, many immigrant farmers I worked with are reterritorializing rural Greek villages and landscapes despite their marginal social status and the socio-economic crisis. Yet austerity has stifled entrepreneurship to the point where fewer and fewer ambitions are acted upon, exacerbating economic hardships and harkening the decline of social and environmental sustainability. State, national, and private non-profit programs such as New Farmer Development, the Agriculture and Land-Based Training Association, and New Entry Sustainable Farming Project in the United States go a long way towards capitalizing on the know-how and capabilities of immigrant farmers, satisfying the desires of a diverse array of rural stakeholders there, reestablishing diversified farming practices as well as a place for rurality in the 21st century. Building upon the foundations of the EU's Young Farmer Program, which has virtually no protocols for handling applicants working outside of their home state, I intend to bring farmers, local, and regional representatives together in a series of forums to suggest a design for this pilot program.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$4,740

Manson, Daniel Leslie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
British Columbia, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 6, 2015
Project Title: 
Manson, Daniel Leslie, U. of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada - To aid research on 'No Roma Land: Deportation and the Spatial-Affective Politics of Inclusion in France,' supervised by Dr. Gaston Gordillo

Preliminary abstract: The goal of this project is to examine ethnographically how a group of Roma migrants from Eastern Europe living in Strasbourg, France, has been affected by a national deportation campaign. The research seeks to explore the forms of sociality and subjectivity engendered by the process of illegalization that renders certain Roma populations that are citizens of the European Union (EU) vulnerable to eviction and exclusion from the rights of full EU citizenship. This research is situated among Romanian Roma immigrants living in makeshift settlements in the urban periphery of Strasbourg that are designated as 'unauthorized encampments.' Rather than focusing solely on the dramatic violence of the expulsions and evictions themselves, this research traces the effects of illegality and deportability into the everyday lives of Roma people. From this vantage point it is possible to glimpse what deportability means to Roma migrants, and also how these people continue to live out their lives in spite of the enduring effects of their legal statuses. The ultimate aim of this research is to query the ways that Roma migrants in France understand their mobility, notions of belonging, and sense of place in relation to ongoing transformations in the EU, and therefore to contribute a critical anthropological perspective to the ongoing debates about Roma inclusion in Europe and about the contested and flexible nature of European citizenship more generally.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$19,339

Diaz de Rada, Angel

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Nacional de Education a Distancia, U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 16, 2002
Project Title: 
Diaz de Rada, Dr. Angel, U. Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid, Spain - To aid research on 'The Construction of Belonging: Expressive Practices and Identity Appropriations among 'Saami' and 'Norwegians' in Kautokeino'

DR. ANGEL DIAZ DE RADA, of the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia in Madrid, Spain, received funding in May 2002 to aid research on expressive practices and identity appropriations among 'Saami' and 'Norwegians' in Kautokeino, Norway. Diaz de Rada's main contention was that construction of the multiple meanings of belonging in Guovdageaidnu-a small but central place in the Saami-Norwegian world-might be best understood as a fight for continuity. He proposed redefining belonging as continuity transferred to the spatial realm of a territory or to the social realm of a collectivity. Belonging is, in this context, a manageable category for the institutional rhetorics and processing of links and for ethnopolitical representation, because working for a place and working for a people are valued instrumental objectives (in contrast to working for the past or working for time continuities). Nevertheless, Diaz de Rada found a clear contrast between discourses and practices of identification in the sphere of the personal and presentative subjects, on one hand, and those in the sphere of the institutional and representative subjects, on the other. In the first case, identification was clearly stated as a set of time-binding operations; in the second, it was stated as a set of territorial, spatial, and demographic images. Place, territory, and people operated as concrete signifiers of time continuities, as tangible units for institutional mobilization and bureaucratic management. The ethnopolitical process itself arose as a special (and partial) dimension of the tension between fragmentation and continuity in this contemporary piece of society. This tension was not, as in the classic gesellschaft-gemeinschaft dichotomy, a matter of opposite modes of social linkage but a tensional processing of every social link.

Publication Credits:

Díaz de Rada, Ángel. 2004. El Sujeto en la Corriente. Reflexiones Sobre el Sujeto Social en Condiciones de Globalización. In El Nuevo Orden de Caos: Consecuencias Socioculturales de la 75 Globalización. Luis Díaz G. Viana, ed. Consejo Superior de investigaciones Científicas: Madrid.

Diaz de Rada, Angel. 2007. School Bureaucracy, Ethnography and Culture: Conceptual Obstacles to Doing Ethnography in Schools. Social Anthropology 15(2): 205-222

Diaz de Rada, Angel. 2007. Valer y Valor. Una Exhumacion de la Teoría del Valor para Reflexionar sobre la Desigualdad y Diferencia en Relación con la Escuela. Revista de Anthropología Social (16): 117-158

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$4,951

Nenko, Ilona

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Jagiellonian U.
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
June 26, 2007
Project Title: 
Nenko, Ilona, Jagiellonian U., Krakow, Poland- To aid short-term library work in anthropology at U. College London, United Kingdom, supervised by Dr. Ruth Mace
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$4,640

Fox, Samantha Maurer

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Fox, Samantha Maurer, Columbia U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'EisenhüttenSTADT IM UMBAU: Imagining New Futures in a Post-Socialist City,' supervised by Dr. Brian Larkin

Preliminary abstract: Eisenhüttenstadt, Germany has been a city defined by a series of imagined futures since it was founded in 1950. Originally called Stalinstadt, it was conceived as the East German state's socialist utopia. Today it is a key site in the German government's push to transform post-industrial cities in the former East Germany into icons of green urbanism, most notably via the consolidation of sparsely populated urban areas and a rapid, often disruptive push to rely on renewable energy sources. My dissertation investigates the role that housing and electricity play in the transformation of Eisenhüttenstadt. I examine how residents interact with and talk about the transformations in their cityscape, and how such engagements fulfill or subvert planners' expectations. I also examine the ideologies of state socialism that lay behind the city's planning and investigate how such ideologies were manifested and experienced. Considering that the same built space has come to serve as a model for strikingly different conceptions of society and urbanization, Eisenhüttenstadt is an ideal site in which to investigate fundamental claims in anthropology about how built space produces social subjects and collectivities, as well as how new urban futures are established and enacted.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$15,504

Praspaliauskiene, Rima

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Davis, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2010
Project Title: 
Praspaliauskiene, Rima, U. of California Davis, Davis, CA - To aid research on 'Thank You, Doctor: Informed Patients, Healthcare, and Ethics in Post-Socialist Lithuania,' supervised by Dr. Joseph Dumit

RIMA PRASPALIAUSKIENE, then a student at the University of California, Davis, California, was awarded a grant in May 2010, to aid research on 'Thank You, Doctor: Informed Patients, Healthcare, and Ethics in Post-Socialist Lithuania,' supervised by Dr. Joseph Dumit. This project explored how in informal economy illness is experienced and how health is managed. By examining one of the components of health practice -- informal payments -- this project looks at the configuration of the concept of health itself, as it currently emerges at the historical intersection of socialist state practices and liberal technologies of government. And it asks: How did the socialist state provision of health-its practices and technologies-contribute to a definition of health during its heyday? How is this definition of health being rearticulated by the neo-liberal state and how do informal payments interfere with it? What is it like to be a patient or a healthcare provider at these historical crossroads? This research approaches the narratives coalescing illness and told by patients, their relatives and doctors as 'envelope narratives.' The envelope here is not solely a metaphor for a monetary transaction that comes up in the narratives, but a metaphor and a concept that encapsulates the linkages between notion of health, belief, hope, and political economy in contemporary Lithuania. Findings suggest that the interconnectedness of both therapeutic systems and social networks is rendered in the envelope narratives, where illness, hope and social networks are bundled.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$11,600

Halili, Rigels

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Polish Academy of Sciences
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Halili, Rigels, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland - To aid research on 'Oral Epic Poetry in Kosovo and Sandzak Nowadays,' supervised by Dr. Andrzej Mencwel

RIGELS HALILI, then a student at Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Oral Epic Poetry in Kosovo and Sandzak Nowadays,' supervised by Dr. Andrzej Mencwel. This research project realized from July 2006 to February 2007, aimed to inquire into the presence, function and role that oral epic poetry plays nowadays in the regions of Sandžak and Kosovo. Several singers have learned their songs from other members of their families or neighbors; in other words through an oral transmission. But others admitted that they have learned songs from different songbooks or tapes of other singers. Textual analysis of recorded songs showed that only among Kosovo singers is there still a strong presence of formulaic character of singing. The traditional way of singing is becoming more and more a professional and commercial activity. In Sanžak, but increasingly in Kosovo as well, epic songs rarely appear in public places that are not in connection with commercial activities. But they are still present in many spheres of private life, especially weddings. Moreover, the number of active singers is decreasing. All singers emphasized that the young generation is not interested in learning old songs, while they prefer newly composed popular songs, especially those broadcasted in the media or distributed on the internet. However, oral forms did not disappear entirely, but were transformed, while functioning in new communicative conditions.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$8,383

Roy, Arpita

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 1, 2007
Project Title: 
Roy, Arpita, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'Particle Physics and the Anthropology of Right and Left,' supervised by Dr. Paul Rabinow

ARPITA ROY, then a student at University of California, Berkeley, California, received funding in November 2007 to aid research on 'Particle Physics and the Anthropology of Right and Left,' supervised by Dr. Paul Rabinow. In November 2009, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Switzerland, is slated to start high-energy proton collisions as a probe into the structure of matter and forces of nature. The research project inquires into modern cosmology through a specific and concrete concept -- chirality or handedness -- with the underlying question, 'What does physics admit of orientation?' If physics presupposes a separation of mind and matter, or subject and object, then how can it base a physical universe with a preferred orientation? If it does not, then what is the relevance of handedness in its discourse? As an object of study in symbolic classification, handedness has a rich genealogy in anthropological thought. The project draws upon and integrates classical anthropological themes with ongoing fieldwork experience at CERN to establish how the concept acquires its present rationality in the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics and symmetries of space-time. Not only are particular concepts (of physics) like momentum, velocity or spin implicated in the study of chirality, but also other abstract ones of space, substance, relation, and form. It is to this discussion that the research makes a contribution. The research is timely both for what it says about the substantive nature of physics and about collaborative practices more generally.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$24,836

Johnson, Alix Barrie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Cruz, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2014
Project Title: 
Johnson, Alix Barrie, U. of California, Santa Cruz, CA - To aid research on 'From Financial Hub to Information Haven: Icelandic Information Economies, Technofutures and National Dreams,' supervised by Dr. Lisa Rofel

Preliminary abstract: The financial crisis of 2008 devastated Iceland's economy and destabilized its sense of identity: having quickly become one of the wealthiest nations in the world, it suddenly looked powerless and peripheral again. Projects of economic recovery, then, also require national re-imagining. This project asks how Icelanders are re-making senses of self, place, and future in the wake of the crisis, by following one major project of national and economic revival: an effort to make Iceland an 'information haven'. By building data centers, founding start-ups, and passing 'information-friendly' legislation, Icelanders hope to carve out a new niche and attract global data to Iceland's shores. The project has sparked discussion and debate on what kind of place Iceland is and will be: a connected, cosmopolitan and tech-savvy data center? Or once again an outpost, the digital equivalent of an offshore bank? By following the process of re-inventing Iceland as an 'information haven,' I trace these national imaginaries as they are materially made.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$5,500

Ammerman, Albert J.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Colgate U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 10, 2007
Project Title: 
Ammerman, Prof. Albert J., Colgate U., Hamilton, NY - To aid 'The Longitudinal Study of Landscape Dynamics at Acconia in Italy'

DR. ALBERT J. AMMERMAN, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'The Longitudinal Study of Landscape Dynamics at Acconia in Italy.' Land use at Acconia has witnessed dramatic changes over the last 80 years. If one goes back to the 1930s, malaria was endemic on the coastal plain and the main activity in the area was the seasonal herding of animals. Today there is prosperity at Acconia due to the production of strawberries and other forms of horticulture in greenhouses. The first strawberries were grown in the mid-1960s, and the number of strawberry fields has steadily increased since then. Under the grant, there was the chance to conduct the fourth mapping of land use in 2007. Previously, the mapping of the whole landscape on a field-by-field basis had been done in 1980, 1989, and 1998. Thus, the four maps now make it possible to trace the evolution of the landscape in detail over a span of 27 years. The fourth mapping revealed, among other things, the further intensification of strawberry production and the recent collapse of the citrus sector. And there are signs today -- rising costs and changing attitudes -- that strawberry production itself is on the verge of a crisis. In addition, the many interviews conducted in 2007 and 2008 have led to a new understanding of the social and economic changes that have gone hand in hand with the transformation of the landscape over the last 27 years. Finally, mention should be made of the implications of the study for the development of recovery theory when it comes to the design and interpretation of archeological surveys.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,600
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