Khlinovskaya Rockhill, Elena Vladimirovna

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cambridge, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 25, 2007
Project Title: 
Khlinovskaya Rockhill, Dr. Elena Vladimirovna, U. of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK - To aid research and writing on 'Lost to the State: Family Discontinuity, Social Orphanhood and Residential Care in the Russian Far East' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. ELENA KHLINOVSKAYA ROCKHILL, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in August 2007 to aid writing and research on 'Lost to the State: Family Discontinuity, Social Orphanhood and Residential Care Institutions in the Russian Far East.' The funding supported writing a book based on the grantee's doctoral research of social orphans, or children who have living family members but grow up in residential care institutions in post-Soviet Russia. The book examines the relationship between the family, the state and the child at the moment of a kinship breakdown, either real or imagined by the state. It demonstrates a skewed power balance based on the moral judgment of the parents. The author proposes a new way of understanding kinship through institutions and ideology with the state in a co-parenting and parenting role, which allows to negate the birth family and to provide the child with another family, that of the state and society. Through narratives of care-leavers the author reveals their views on 'social orphanhood.' The book also reflects on similarities between Soviet/post-Soviet child welfare practices, and those of some western democracies, and discusses the possible nature of these similarities.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Berglund, Eeva K.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Goldsmiths College
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 9, 2002
Project Title: 
Berglund, Dr. Eeva, Goldsmiths College, London, UK - To aid research on 'Natural Resources and Expertise in Rural Finland : An Ethnographic Study of Biotechnology'

DR. EEVA BERGLUND, of Goldsmiths College in London, England, was awarded a grant in July 2002 to aid ethnographic research on biotechnology in rural Finland, where modernization has been both relatively recent and successful. Berglund focused on capital-intensive biotechnology as part of regional development under conditions of globalization, asking what local experiences of the 'new economy' and the 'information society' might have been. The research, carried out in Kainuu Province and in Helsinki, was based on documentary sources, ethnography in a small food-biotechnology laboratory, and interviews with regional elites. The results indicated a mismatch between provincial discourses of forced adaptation and hegemonic discourses of inevitable technological dynamism and continuing national progress. Alongside this disjuncture were salient continuities in the ways local landscapes were conceptualized, which may be leading to an underemphasis on the gravity of Kainuu's economic problems. Berglund found a complex and multilayered understanding of nature; both sacredness and the capacity to create artificial environments were highly valued in the Kainuu region. Indeed, it was economic risk and lack of commercial know-how rather than technological fear with which people struggled, a situation characteristic of Finland as an economic unit. Regional, community, and local action was highly valued in Kainuu, and even the most capital-intensive practices were appropriated for local ends. A historical survey of Finnish science and technology policy suggests that this ideology has been built into the modernization of the country from independence, with implications for the way people think about nature, technology, and the state.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$5,500

Tesar, Catalina Constantina

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National School of Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2007
Project Title: 
Tesar, Catalina Constantina, National School of Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest, Romania - To aid training in social anthropology at U. College London, United Kingdom, Supervised by Michael Sinclair Stewart
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$17,445

Li, Darryl Chi-Yee

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2008
Project Title: 
Li, Darryl Chi-Yee, Harvard U., Cambridge, MA - To aid research on 'Another Universalism? Transnational Islamist Movements and Bosnia-Herzegovina,' supervised by Dr. Engseng Ho

DARRYL CHI-YEE LI, then a student at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, received a grant in April 2008 to aid research on 'Another Universalism? Transnational Islamist Movements and Bosnia-Herzegovina,' supervised by Dr. Engseng Ho. This project analyzes how Arab Islamists -- especially ex-fighters and aid workers -- in Bosnia-Herzegovina reconciled their pan-Islamist commitments with their experiences of cultural, racial, and doctrinal difference vis-a-vis Bosnian Muslims. This research was conducted between September 2009 and July 2011 based in Sarajevo and Zenica, with trips to Brcko, Bugojno, Travnik, Tuzla, and Visoko. Extensive ethnographic life-history interviews were conducted with Arab immigrants in Bosnia-Herzegovina, with a focus on ex-combatants and NGO workers. These interviews took place in a variety of locales, including family homes, cafes, during roadtrips, offices, and an immigration detention center. A similar number of Bosnians who fought alongside, married, or worked with such individuals were also interviewed at length. Archival research supplemented this data, including Bosnian court records and administrative papers; army and state documents gathered by the UN International Criminal Tribunal for ex-Yugoslavia; wartime and post-war newspaper and magazine collections; and Islamic booklets and pamphlets produced by and about Arab Islamists in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$23,290

Constantin, Marin

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Institute. of Enthnography and Folklore
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 23, 2002
Project Title: 
Constantin, Marin, Rainer Anthropological Research Center, Bucharest, Romania - To aid oral history interview with Professor Paul Henri Stahl and his field informants among the folk artisans in Romania - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$2,890

Willson, Margaret Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2010
Project Title: 
Willson, Dr. Margaret Elizabeth, U. of Washington, Seattle, WA - To aid research on 'Turning the Tide: Gender, Seafaring, and Notions of Risk in Iceland'

DR. MARGARET E. WILLSON, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, was awarded funding in May 2010, to aid research on 'Turning the Tide: Gender, Seafaring, and Notions of Risk in Iceland.' This project explored male and female notions of risk in Iceland, particularly as related to fishing practice. One aim was to learn how these notions of risk might have contributed to Iceland's economic collapse. The investigator found that although Icelandic notions of risk vary between men and women as regards concepts of investment, they do not vary dramatically as regards their relationship to hazards of the land, sea and weather. An emergent focus of the research was on sea women. The traditional way Iceland gendered work is described as that women worked on land while the men worked at sea. However, this research found that a small but significant number of women have worked at sea from the earliest times to the present. These women also hold, and have held, positions at all levels of the fishing industry and, it appears, in all areas of the country. Thus, these women represent a thin slice of experience and knowledge that runs through the entire industry. This research will change the literature regarding women and fishing in Iceland. It also gained insight into how notions of risk are gendered and explored new ways of considering gendered models of development and access to power.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$19,920

Mishtal, Joanna Zofia

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Central Florida, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 6, 2011
Project Title: 
Mishtal, Dr. Joanna Zofia, U. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL - To aid research and writing on 'Contradictions of Democratization: Reproductive Rights and the Politics of Morality in Poland' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. JOANNA Z. MISHTAL, University of Central Florida, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2011 to aid research and writing 'Contradictions of Democratization: Reproductive Rights and the Politics of Morality in Poland.' The book is a historical, theoretical, and ethnographic study of the intersections of politics, gender, and religion. Based on 21 months of ethnographic fieldwork during doctoral and postdoctoral research between 2000 and 2007 in Krakow, Warsaw, and Gdansk, the book explores the postsocialist democratization process and the contentiousness of reproductive politics that emerged since the 1989 fall of state socialism. As reproductive rights became significantly curtailed after the fall of the socialist regime due to the new-found political power of the Catholic Church in Poland, the politics of gender and reproduction shifted to the center of transformative negotiations taking place nationally in Poland and internationally within the European Union. Findings argue for an alternative understanding of Polish democratization refocused around reproductive politics, and make a contribution to the theoretical debates on the significance of regime change and transition politics for feminist consciousness-raising and mobilization. This study demonstrates the centrality of the governance of women's bodies in postsocialist politics-a constitutive feature of the Polish democratization process.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Erikson, Susan L.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Denver, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 13, 2002
Project Title: 
Erikson, Dr. Susan L., U. of Denver, Denver, CO - To aid research and writing on 'Engendering the Global: Women, Medicine, and Technology in Re-Unified Germany' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. SUSAN L. ERIKSON, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship to aid research and writing on 'Engendering the Global: Women, Medicine, and Technology in Re-Unified Germany.' Funding supported a research trip to Siemens Medical Solutions world headquarters in Mountain View, California and write-up of a book manuscript. Using an ethnography of reproduction to explicate the global, national, and local opportunities and constraints that shape lived-experience, the book addresses theoretical and methodological gaps in the social science literature on globalization and presents a new model for understanding global praxis. The book suggests a reconfiguration of globalization theory and method, one that conjoins macro and micro processes. Drawing from an ethnographic research project that includes data from Siemens' corporate headquarters in Germany and the United States (the ultrasound divisions of Siemens Medical Solutions) as well as patients lived-experiences of prenatal diagnostic technology use, the book argues that the unpacking of 'assemblages' (following Ong and Collier 2005) of power help us to better understand the politics and policy of maternity care. In this case study from Germany, corporate profit-making strategies converge (not coincidentally) with German healthcare policies and biomedical protocols in ways that set the stage for German prenatal ultrasound use, the highest in the world.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$14,675

Pellegrino, Manuela

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
College London, U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 7, 2008
Project Title: 
Pellegrino, Manuela, U. College London, London, United Kingdom - To aid research on 'Language Policy and Ideology: The Case of Griko,' supervised by Dr. Charles W. Stewart

MANUELA PELLEGRINO, then a student at University College London, London, United Kingdom, was awarded a grant in 2008 to aid research on 'Language Policies and Ideologies: The Case of Griko,' supervised by Charles Stewart. This research investigated the politics of language revival in the case of Griko, a language of Greek origins spoken in the southern Italian Province of Lecce (Grecìa Salentina). It explored mediating processes between national and international bodies that provide funding, and local groups that support Griko, with the aim of studying the impact of national and supranational policies on local linguistic ideologies and policies. The study was based on one year of fieldwork conducted in the villages of Grecìa Salentina. Ethnography included participant observation in local cultural manifestations dedicated to Griko (music festival, seminars, poetry competition etc); semi-structured interviews with leaders of local cultural organizations and local cultural brokers engaged in Griko's revival; semi-structured interviews with village mayors and school principals; and weekly observation in Griko classes given in primary schools. In order to capture the language-scape of Griko in the period preceding the current revival, a daichronic approach was adopted covering the last 20 years.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$23,447

Gruszko, Mariel Edith

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Irvine, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 8, 2015
Project Title: 
Gruszko, Mariel Edith, U. of California, Irvine, CA - To aid research on 'Architecting Participation: Making Lived Models for and of Democratic Participation in Barcelona,' supervised by Dr. Keith Murphy

Preliminary abstract: This project is an investigation of the ways in which residents of Barcelona, Spain work to reshape political life and the city through participatory building projects. I will conduct 12 months of ethnographic research on the collaborative design and construction of social centers and other shared public or community buildings. My research will be centered in the work of LaCol, an award-winning architecture firm that works with expert and lay stakeholders on participatory design projects, and in activities at Can Batllo, a neighborhood social center that LaCol helped build. I will investigate how everyday understandings of participation, belonging, and democratic self-governance are made, negotiated, and learned through collaborative building. This research will illuminate the ways in which city residents merge deliberative processes with small-scale building projects to create a form of politics that is not only concerned with ideological argumentation, but also with reshaping the spatial and material structures that regiment everyday life. Such an approach will help explain how residents of large cities come to feel included in civic decision-making processes and how they come to understand themselves as wielding substantial power over their daily lives. My research hypothesizes that participatory building changes both the form of the city and the shape of everyday life.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$11,090
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