Lin, Emily Xi

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 16, 2013
Project Title: 
Lin, Emily Xi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA - To aid research on 'Disability's Star-Children: Autism and the Remaking of Urban China's Moral Order,' supervised by Dr. Stefan Helmreich

Preliminary abstract: This project examines how autism has emerged in contemporary China after 1978, moving from being a disorder with no indigenous counterpart, to a disorder, translated as guduzheng or zibizheng, now fairly ubiquitous in urban China. Through my fieldwork with the help of psychiatrists, nongovernmental organizations, parents and other professional caregivers, Beijing, Handan and Shenzhen, I hope to test out my hypothesis that the a 'moral crisis' is a necessity condition for the successful uptake of a foreign disorder. Beyond the comparative value it holds for the social analysis of autism cross-culturally, my study also intervene in anthropological concerns with human kind-making, the influence of culture on psychopathology, and the use of disease classifications in the production of citizen and nation-state.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$19,928

Harrison, Kevin David

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Yale U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 26, 2001
Project Title: 
Harrison, Dr. K. David, Yale U., New Haven, CT - To aid oral history interviews with Prof. Harold C. Conklin and documentary filming at his field site in Ifugao, Philippines
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$4,718

Chaudhuri, Tapoja

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Delhi, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
March 24, 2008
Project Title: 
Chaudhuri, Tapoja, U. of Delhi, Delhi, India - To aid dissertation write-up in cultural anthropology at U. of Washington, Seattle, WA, supervised by Prof. Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan
Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$17,500

Zukosky, Michael L.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Temple U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 20, 2004
Project Title: 
Zukosky, Michael L., Temple U., Philadelphia, PA - To aid research on 'Transforming Environmentality: Subjectivity and Development in China's Altai Mountains, 'supervised by Dr. Sydney D. White

MICHAEL L. ZUKOSKY, then a student at Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was awarded a grant in May 2004 to aid research on 'Transforming Environmentality: Subjectivity and Development in China's Altai Mountains,' supervised by Dr. Sydney D. White. This research project, through participant observation with Kazakh pastoralists and the collection of various official and expert narratives of grassland science and pastoral development, demonstrated the way that a local political context transformed the efforts of grassland science experts to create viable political subjects. This knowledge did not always contribute to the state's vision of social order, as internally its own incongruities complicated its efforts and as experts interacted with other actors and the improvised political needs of the moment demanded other kinds of solutions. As a point of contrast, this knowledge was successful in creating subjects of 'settlement,' as it linked groups of actors and resources together, but the outcomes differed significantly from what experts had imagined, as pastoralists used 'settlement' in their own ways.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$5,935

Solomon, Daniel Allen

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Cruz, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 17, 2008
Project Title: 
Solomon, Daniel Allen, U. of California, Santa Cruz, CA - To aid research on 'Coexistence and Conflict: Associative Techniques of Humans and Rhesus Macaques in Northern India,' supervised by Dr. Susan Friend Harding

DANIEL A. SOLOMON, then a student at University of California, Santa Cruz, California, received a grant in October 2008 to aid research on 'Coexistence and Conflict: Associative Techniques of Humans and Rhesus Macaques in Northern India,' supervised by Dr. Susan Harding. This research focused on the often problematic relationships between humans and rhesus macaques in and around 'monkey temples' in Delhi and Shimla, India. The project had two focuses: first, the ways in which humans and rhesus monkeys associated with one another in everyday contexts; and second, how monkeys were talked about in media and political narratives about problems like monkey attacks and crop destruction. Urban macaques make their livings on handouts from devotees of the monkey-like god Hanuman and on the edible refuse left behind by dense urban crowds and patchy waste-handling infrastructure. So as monkey management programs have begun to take off in earnest, questions around waste management and the distribution of public resources have been highlighted. Debates about what to do with problematic monkeys have often taken the form of a critique of Indian modernization and government competence in general, but these debates have also provided spaces for re-evaluating governmental and religious protections afforded to animals vis-à-vis the travails of underserved classes of people. These particular issues offer urban Indians spaces for experimenting with different techniques for mitigating the most adverse effects of coexistence between social species, and for re-imagining the ethics of social protections and resource distribution.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$16,835

Menon, Kalyani Devaki

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
DePaul U., IL
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 11, 2012
Project Title: 
Menon, Dr. Kalyani Devaki, DePaul University, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Making Place for Muslims: Religious Practice and Placemaking in Contemporary India'

Preliminary abstract: This project will explore how religious practice enables Muslims residing in Old Delhi to construct identity, community, and national belonging in contemporary India. Exclusionary constructions of religion and identity have enabled extreme violence against Indian Muslims, and have resulted in their political and economic marginalization in the country. Living amidst such inequalities, exclusion, and violence, how do people construct alternative imaginaries that bridge difference and facilitate coexistence? Drawing on data gathered over eight months of fieldwork amongst Muslims who inhabit the religiously plural spaces of Old Delhi, I will explore how religious practice enables alternative and inclusive constructions of community in the face of violent assertions of exclusion in contemporary India. In exploring this question, my project speaks to broader anxieties generated by the pluralism that marks the contemporary moment and challenges constructions of Muslim difference that animate Islamophobia, thus making a significant contribution to scholarship on the place of religion in the modern world. In focusing on how individuals build communities across axes of difference, my project underscores the importance of studying identity, and indeed religion itself, not in isolation, but rather as always in relation to others and inflected by the pluralism that marks our world.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$19,992

Huang, Yu

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Huang, Yu, U. of Washington, Seattle, WA - To aid research on 'Cultivating 'Science-Savvy' Citizens: Empowerment and Risk in Shrimp Aquaculture Development in China,' supervised by Dr. Ann Anagnost

YU HUANG, then a student at University of Washington, Seattle Washington, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'Cultivating 'Science-Savvy' Citizens: Empowerment and Risk in Shrimp Aquaculture Development in China,' supervised by Dr. Ann Anagnost. This research seeks to investigate how, in the context of China's economic reforms, aquaculture has become a site where the state engineers new forms of citizenship to fit the demands of the global economy, and how new forms of subjectivity around empowerment and risk emerge in tension with state projects. While slogans of 'scientific aquaculture' hailed farmers' pursuit of unprecedented high-yields in the 1990s, recently, the focus of science extension has shifted to the promotion of 'healthy aquaculture.' This research traces how scientific aquaculture was produced 'in action' as a result of friction between the state's neoliberal policies, scientists' social aspirations, and farmers' conceptualization of risks. Research sites include stationary sites such as a village dominated by small family farms and a large state-owned collective farm, as well as mobile sites such as science extension activities including fish veterinary training workshops and food safety inspection trips. In addition, the researcher rented a shrimp farm to conduct experimental shrimp farming. Evidence from this project will not only help facilitate more conversations between fishery managers and shrimp farmers, but it will collaborate with both experts and lay people to speculate on the possibilities of new forms of agency in a globalized economy.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$21,871

Connolly, Jennifer

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Graduate Center, City U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 27, 2001
Project Title: 
Connolly, Jennifer, City U. of New York - Graduate Center, New York, NY - To aid research on 'Religious Conversion Among Indonesian Dayaks,' supervised by Dr. Rayna Rapp

Publication Credit:

Connolly, Jennifer. 2009. Forbidden Intimacies: Christian-Muslim Intermarriage in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. American Ethnologist 36(3):492-506.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Tahir, Madiha

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Tahir, Madiha, Columbia U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'The Recognition of Risk: Drone Warfare and Strategies of Recognition,' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth Povinelli

Preliminary abstract: In the face of the variable logics of empire--in particular, in the practice of drone attacks on Pakistan's Tribal Areas (FATA)--how do survivors and families of the dead attempt to gain recognition for their loss? What is the relationship between the displacement of all risk onto people living on the political and geographic margins of Pakistan and the forms of recognition open to them in the international discourse of human rights? My dissertation project analyzes how drone affectees deploy artifacts--testimony, photos of dead kin--in tandem with human rights organizations to lay claim to their humanity and dignity. They attempt to resuscitate a data point into a fleshly material body that has been killed. I ask: How do these strategies succeed and fail? What are the vocabularies and discursive techniques through which these artifacts are made and unmade? My project contributes to anthropological literature on violence and the social as well as examining how our world and forms of recognition are being remade as new technologies make it possible to (once again) re-distribute risk across the globe.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Ngo, Anh-Thu Thi

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2011
Project Title: 
Ngo, Anh-Thu Thi, Harvard U., Cambridge, MA - To aid research on 'Constructing / Belonging in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam,' supervised by Dr. Michael Herzfeld

ANH-THU THI NGO, then a student at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, received funding in April 2011 to aid research on 'Constructing/Belonging in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam,' supervised by Dr. Michael Herzfeld. This research focuses on transformation, adaptation, and belonging in Vietnam's largest metropolis, Ho Chi Minh City (known locally as Saigon). Three fields of interaction -- distinguished broadly as artistic, political and philanthropic activity -- serve as the grounds for an examination of the sociality inherent to self- and world-making in the context of urban growth. Amid both the empowering and obstructing capacities of city life, how do particular agents construct the means for grounding their lives meaningfully? How do the landscapes and social processes around them impinge on these endeavors? In each of the three spheres of inquiry, young Saigonese organize themselves to share information and resources to broaden and enable their creative, civic or charitable aims. The urban environment, which engenders these connections, grounds the ethnographic picture, even as