Lambek, Michael Joshua

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Toronto, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 9, 2008
Project Title: 
Lambek, Dr. Michael Joshua, U. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada - To aid workshop on 'The Anthropology of Ordinary Ethics,' 2008, U. Toronto

'The Anthropology of Ordinary Ethics'
October 3-6, 2008, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
Organizer: Michael Joshua Lambek (University of Toronto)

Goals of this workshop were to advance anthropological theory by exploring the nature, grounds, and centrality of ethics for social life and, more particularly, to refine and elaborate an understanding of the ethical entailments of ordinary (everyday) speech and action. Participants in the workshop addressed the following central questions: What is the place of the ethical in human life and how might attention to the ethical impact on anthropological theory and enrich our understanding of thought, speech, and social action? Insofar as the ethical is implicit in human action, how do we render it visible? How can anthropology best draw from and contribute to philosophical debate and to a broader conceptualization and demonstration of the ethical in human life? A total of 21 socio-cultural and linguistic
anthropologists presented and discussed their pre-circulated papers, some of which were more conceptual while others drew upon and illustrated empirical research. Presenters also engaged with two philosophers, one political theorist, and four additional anthropologists as assigned discussants, plus a number of chairs and auditors. A volume of the papers has been accepted for publication by Fordham University Press.

Publication Credit:

Lambek, Michael (ed.) 2010. Ordinary Ethics: Anthropology, Language, and Action. Fordham University Press: New York

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$14,500

Adair, Mary J.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Kansas, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
September 22, 2014
Project Title: 
Adair, Dr. Mary, U. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS - To aid preparation of the research materials of Dr. Robert Squier for archival deposit with the Biodiversity Institute (formerly Museum of Anthropology) at the U. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS - Historical Archives
Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$14,521

Morales, Ana

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Costa Rica, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
April 26, 2012
Project Title: 
Morales, Ana, U. de Costa Rica, San Jose, Costa Rica - To aid training in physical-biological anthropology at U. of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, supervised by Dr. Geoffrey McCafferty
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$17,500

Blumenthal, Scott Adam

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Graduate Center, City U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2013
Project Title: 
Blumenthal, Scott Adam, City U. of New York, Graduate Center, New York, NY - To aid research on Reconstructing Woody Cover and Habitat Heterogeneity in Modern and Ancient East African Environments with Stable Isotopes,' supervised by Dr. Thomas W. Plummer

Preliminary abstract: The evolutionary history of the human lineage is often linked to environmental change, particularly during the early Pleistocene (about 2.5 to 1 million years ago). This period is associated with the origin of the genera Homo and Paranthropus, the appearance of stone toolmaking, significant increases in body mass and brain size, and increased diet breadth. Paleoenvironmental data suggest that selection pressures associated with foraging in increasingly open environments may have driven these innovations. The broad pattern of decreasing woody cover seems to have been superimposed over long-term environmental variability. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the range of environments inhabited by hominins at any given time is severely biased by interpretations from a small sample of sites, and we have no way to directly assess heterogeneity in the fossil record. The first aim of this study is to use stable isotope analysis of plants and soils to better understand environmental heterogeneity in modern East African environments. Modern sampling will first be conducted in national parks and game reserves in Uganda, which encompass an environmental gradient from wet, densely vegetated tropical forests to semi-arid grasslands. This will provide better analogs for reconstructing the ancient environments inhabited by fossil hominins. The second aim of this study is to apply this framework to early Pleistocene fossil soils from the Homa Peninsula, western Kenya in the region north of Homa Mountain. This fossil- and artifact-rich region provides a unique ecological and geographic perspective on early toolmaking hominins.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$17,823

Ratsimbazafy, Jonah H.

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Stony Brook, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
August 3, 2001
Project Title: 
Ratsimbazafy, Jonah, U. of Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar - To aid training in physical anthropology at SUNY, Stony Brook, NY,supervised by Dr. Patricia Wright
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$12,500

Ellen, Roy Frank

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Kent, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 20, 2002
Project Title: 
Ellen, Dr. Roy F., U. of Kent, Canterbury, UK - To aid the Ninth Congress of Ethnobiology on ethnobiology, social change, and displacement, 2003, U. of Kent

'Ninth International Congress of Ethnobiology: Ethnobiology, Social Change and Displacement,' June 13-17, 2004, University of Kent (Canterbury, UK) -- Organizer: Dr. Roy F. Ellen (University of Kent). This was the first meeting of the Congress to be held in Europe, and brought together participants from the International Society of Ethnobiology, the Society for Economic Botany and the International Society of Ethnopharmacology. Plenary addresses were given by Brent Berlin, Arun Agrawal, Ganesan Balachander, Gerard Bodeker, Gordon Hillman, and Javier Caballero. Reflecting the theme and the location, there was special emphasis placed on the relationship between ethnobiological knowledge and socio-ecological change, population dislocation, and risk management; and on the ethnobiology of immigrant cultural minorities, the European regional traditions, and traditional minorities within Europe. Beyond these core themes, the 39 contributory panels reflected the breadth of contemporary work in the field, ranging from 'The ethnobotany of crop diversity and evolution,' to 'Ethnopharmacy and migration' and 'Ethnobiology and the sciences of humankind.'

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$14,548

Sutton, Constance R.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 9, 2001
Project Title: 
Sutton, Dr. Constance, New York U., New York, NY - To aid oral-history interviews with select members of the International Women's Anthropology Conference and New York Women's Anthropology Conference
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$1,273

Grine, Frederick E.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Stony Brook, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2006
Project Title: 
Grine, Dr. Frederick, State U. of New York, Stony Brook, NY - To aid conference on 'What Is Homo? The origin of our genus,' 2006, Stony Brook, in collaboration with Dr. Richard Leakey

'Stony Brook Human Evolution Symposium.' October 3-7, 2006, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York. Organizers: Frederick Grine and Dr. Richard Leakey, Stony Brook University. Stony Brook University has recently begun sponsoring a series of Workshops in Human Evolution. These are modeled along the lines of the Wenner-Gren conferences that were held at Burg Wartenstein, Austria, bringing together small groups of scholars to meet in an informal setting for several days. These workshops seek to address major issues in palaeoanthropology. The first two workshops, held in 2004 and 2005, focused on the topics 'African Origin of Modern Humans' and 'Out of Africa I: Who, Where and When?' This third workshop addressed 'The Origin of the Genus Homo.' The goal of the workshop was to bring together the researchers who have contributed most influentially to the interpretation of the palaeontological, archaeological and palaeoenvironmental evidence pertaining to the origin and early evolution of our own genus. The opening day was held on the Stony Brook University campus, and consisted of a public symposium with lectures by seven of the participants. These lectures were followed by panel discussions involving the other workshop participants. Following the one-day, public symposium, the workshop was convened at a private retreat where the participants engaged in informal, round-table discussion of different topics addressing several themes that are relevant to the origin and early evolution of the genus Homo. General themes included: Alpha taxonomy, Phylogeny, Ancestry, Archaeology, Behavior, Diet, Bodies, Development, Energetics, Geochronology, Paleoclimates, and Paleoecology. The individual papers that were contributed and discussed will be brought together in an edited volume to be published by Springer.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$5,000

Vashro, Layne Joseph

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Utah, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2011
Project Title: 
Vashro, Layne Joseph, U. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT - To aid research on 'Post-marital Residence among the Twe of Northwestern Namibia,' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth A. Cashdan

LAYNE J. VASHRO, then a student at University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, received a grant April 2011 to aid research on 'Post-Marital Residence among the Twe of Northwestern Namibia,' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth A. Cashdan. The results of this project support recent research showing that cultural ideals often have minimal bearing on whether couples move to live with the husband's or the wife's family after marriage. This project also began the process of explaining the factors that shape variation in which form of 'post-marital residence' different couples adopt. Childcare assistance offered by women's female relatives is an important incentive for women to stay home after marriage. The impact of the maternal grandmother, identified as a key source of childcare among the Twe and many other populations, is a strong example of this. Twe couples are 28 percent more likely to live in the maternal camp when the maternal grandmother is still alive and able to provide childcare assistance. Men's wealth also plays an important role in shaping post-marital residence. Wealthy men draw their spouses, the spouses of their children, and even the families of these spouses to their residence camp. These men become a residence focal point and lead to larger residence communities. While some women own animals among the Twe, they never develop large enough herds to become residence focal points because inheritance only runs through men.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$11,690

Chiarelli, Brunetto A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Int'l Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 2, 2003
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Florence, Italy (through Executive Secretary, IUAES) - To aid 15th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, 2003, Florence
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$15,000