Panter-Brick, Catherine

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Durham, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 12, 2005
Project Title: 
Panter-Brick, Dr. Catherine, U. of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom - To aid conference on 'Health, Risk, and Adversity: A New Synthesis from Biological Anthropology,' 2006, U. of Durham, in collaboration with Dr. Agustin Fuentes

'Health, Risk, and Adversity: a New Synthesis from Biological Anthropology.' April 7-10, 2006, Durham, United Kingdom. Organizers: Catherine Panter-Brick (University of Durham) and Agustin Fuentes (University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana). Research on health involves evaluating the production of disparities that are systematically associated with the experience of risk, including genetic and physiological variation, environmental exposure to poor nutrition and disease, and social marginalization. Anthropology and Public Health research often converge in focusing attention on the important issue of who suffers from poor health outcomes, but both disciplines are still developing approaches to examining this question in conjunction with issues as to why and how health differentials are produced over the lifetime of given individuals. This conference aimed to enhance understanding of both outcomes and processes shaping relationships between health, risk and adversity -- to facilitate linkages between multiple levels of inquiry, into who or what drives the production of health disparities as well as into how, when and why differential health outcomes are produced. The conference, held at the University of Durham, focused on discourse related to pathways of risk and adversity conducive to variation in human health, and was attended by researchers from North America, Mexico, and England. Participants sought to reflect systematically on the theoretical and practical contributions of biological anthropology to these issues.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Bullock Kreger, Meggan Miranda-Lee

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pennsylvania State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 1, 2007
Project Title: 
Bullock Kreger, Meggan Miranda-Lee, Pennsylvania State U., University Park, PA - To aid research on 'Immigrant Mortality in the Postclassic Urban Center of Cholula, Puebla,' supervised by Dr. Kenneth Hirth

MEGGAN M. BULLOCK KREGER, then a student at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, was awarded a grant in November 2007 to aid research on 'Immigrant Mortality in the Postclassic Urban Center of Cholula, Puebla,' supervised by Dr. Kenneth Hirth. As part of a paleodemographic reconstruction of the Postclassic (AD 900-1521) urban center of Cholula, Puebla, a strontium isotope study of skeletons from a low-status residential zone was carried out to identify immigrants and to determine how they may have contributed to population dynamics in this Mesoamerican city. A preliminary interpretation of the strontium isotope data suggests that as much as 18-22% of the sample may consist of nonlocal individuals. As tentatively identified immigrants disproportionately date to the Early Postclassic, immigration may have played some role in the resurgence of the city during this time period. Both males and females were represented among potential immigrants, but females were slightly more numerous, which may reflect women immigrating to Cholula in order to marry. A child was also identified as having a possibly nonlocal value; thus, it seems that family groups were also relocating to the city. Adults identified as possible immigrants disproportionately died between the ages of 30 and 50, while those native residents who survived to adulthood generally lived past the age of 50, perhaps indicating that selective factors on migration resulted in immigrants to Cholula being frailer than native residents.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$10,050

Callan, Hilary Margaret West

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Royal Anthropological Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 16, 2004
Project Title: 
Royal Anthropological Institute, London, England - To aid preparation and organization of the RAI's historical materials for archival access
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Engelbrecht, Beate

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Gottingen, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 23, 2001
Project Title: 
Engelbrecht, Dr. Beate, Institute for Scientific Research, Goettingen, Germany - To aid conference on origins of visual anthropology: putting the past together, 2000, IWF- Institute for Scientific Film, in collaboration with Dr. Rolf Husmann
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Tehrani, Jamshid Johari

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Durham, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 31, 2011
Project Title: 
Tehrani, Dr. Jamshid, Durham U., Durham, UK - To aid annual conference of 'European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association (EHBEA),' 2012, Durham U., in collaboration with Dr. Robert Barton

Preliminary Abstract: The aim of the European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association (EHBEA) Conference is to create an annual multidisciplinary international forum in which researchers applying evolutionary theory to human behaviour can meet and exchange ideas. Evolutionary explanations of human behaviour, including human behavioural ecology, evolutionary psychology and cultural evolution, now provide important perspectives in anthropology and related disciplines. We aim to bring together researchers from these fields to foster discussion and collaboration both within Europe, which until recently lacked such a forum, and with other prominent research regions including the USA. The EHBEA mission statement explicitly supports the integration of these different approaches and their application to a wide range of theoretical and applied topics, such as subsistence, kinship, medicine, archaeology and economics.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$10,546

Harris, John William Kendal

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rutgers U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Harris, Dr. John William Kendal, Rutgers U., New Brunswick, NJ; and Mbua, Dr. Emma N., National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya - To aid collaborative research on 'International Collaborative Paleoanthropological Research Project (lcpr), Ileret, Kenya'
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$29,750

White, Frances Joy

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oregon, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 9, 2008
Project Title: 
White, Dr. Frances J., U. of Oregon, Eugene, OR - To aid workshop on 'Human Warfare: An Integrative Anthropological Prospective,' 2008, U. of Oregon, in collaboration with Dr. Douglas Kennett

'Human Warfare: An Integrative Anthropological Perspective'
October 16-18, 2008, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon
Organizers: Frances J. White and Douglas Kennett, University of Oregon

This meeting addressed the need for an integrated model of the ancestral conditions that led to the emergence of warfare and/or to adaptations that evolved in response to those pressures. To this end, the conference brought together scholars from diverse anthropological sub-disciplines (e.g. primatology, paleo-anthropology, archaeology, behavioral ecology, ethnography) and related disciplines (e.g. political science, psychology, economics, evolutionary biology) whose work has significantly advanced knowledge on this topic but who would not otherwise have occasion to meet. The conference resulted in a book proposal, which has been enthusiastically received by Oxford University Press and will soon be sent out for review. This volume will constitute the first comprehensive evolutionary treatment of the ecological, social, and psychological processes involved in warfare.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$5,000

Jillani, Ngalla E.

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National Museums of Kenya
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
January 8, 2009
Project Title: 
Jillani, Ngalla Edward, National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya - To aid training in physical-biological anthropology at U. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, supervised by Dr. Paul R. Manger
Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$17,500

Leopold, Robert S.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 13, 2010
Project Title: 
Leopold, Robert S., National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Marvin Harris - Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Atsalis, Sylvia

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
San Diego, Zoological Society of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Atsalis, Dr. Sylvia, San Diego Zoological Society, San Diego, CA - To aid research on 'Menopause and Postreproductive Lifespan in a Cooperatively Breeding Primate: Hormonal Assessment of Aged Langurs'

DR. SYLVIA ATSALIS, San Diego Zoological Society, San Diego, California, was awarded a grant in October 2007 to aid research on 'Menopause and Postreproductive Lifespan in a Cooperatively Breeding Primate: Hormonal Assessment of Aged Langurs.' A postmenopausal lifespan frees women to care for grandchildren. Other primate species that share with humans strong cooperatively breeding traits might also experience menopause and lengthy postreproductive lifespan. Langurs are known for offspring allocare with postreproductive females identified in the wild. Our goal was to conduct reproductive hormonal research on zoo-housed Francois langur females to assess whether, like humans, they typically experience a lengthy postreproductive lifespan. Progesterone data in conjunction with individual female information on year of last birth would help to determine length of postreproductive lifespan. In fact, geriatric females (n=3) were cycling but none conceived during the study, whereas all control subjects (n=6) conceived, even when progesterone did not exhibit distinguishable cycling patterns. No significant changes in average hormone concentrations were detected in geriatric females over two years, nor between older and younger females. There are hints that age may affect ability to conceive but postreproductive lifespan may be short. Testosterone and estradiol cycling patterns will be investigated to further characterize reproductive ability. Detailed analyses of all hormones may help to gauge differences between age classes, particularly, to establish timing of specific reproductive landmarks including the relationship between the end of hormonal cycling and age at last birth.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$17,600
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