National University of Mongolia

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National U. of Mongolia
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - Institutional Development Grant

The main aim of the project is to radically upgrade the institutional capacity of the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, National University of Mongolia, in order to make the department an institution that offers internationally sound anthropological research and training in Mongolia, and thus establish the field of socio-cultural anthropology in Mongolia firmly. The specific objectives of the project are to (1) develop a sound doctoral program that meets international standards, (2) train 4 new doctorates jointly with the Mongolian and Inner Asian Studies Unit (MIASU) and the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge, and recruit these doctorates as faculty members in the Department, (3) build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance technical capacity of the department.

Mongolian and Cambridge professors will set up a joint committee and design and develop a doctoral program. Four Mongolian and four Cambridge professors will take part in designing and developming of doctoral program and courses. They will mainly work through internet, however, Mongolian professors will visit the Cambridge University. Four Mongolian professors will work at MIASU in total of 7 months while developing ten doctoral courses.

In order to radically enhance the department's research and teaching capacity the Department will select four doctoral candidates for a temporary joint Ph.D. program. The selected doctoral candidates will study and conduct their research under Mongolian and Cambridge professors' joint supervision. Each doctoral candidate will spend a total of two full terms (5 months) of training at Cambridge University. Doctoral candidates are expected to submit their dissertation in English and defend their dissertations in front of the joint committee. Upon their successful completion of their degree, they will be recruited to the department as faculty members.

In addition, to support its research and teaching the department will build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance its technical capacity.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Bodzsar, Eva B.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Eotvos Lorand U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2006
Project Title: 
Bodzsar, Dr. Eva, Eotvos Lorand U., Budapest, Hungary - To aid 15th congress of European Anthropological Association (EAA) on 'Man and Environment: Trends and Challenges in Anthropology,' 2006, Eotvos Lorand U.

'Man and Environment: Tends and Challenges in Anthropology' August 31-September 3, 2006, Budapest, Hungary. Organizer: Eva Bodzsar (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest). The 15th EAA Congress. was organized by the Department of Biological Anthropology at Eötvös Loránd University and was also a celebration of the 125th anniversary of the founding of the Department. The Congress strived to encompass all aspects of physical anthropology pertinent to the understanding of human origins as well as the variability of ancient and present populations. At the beginning of the 21st century it seemed important to summarize what we had learned in the last hundred years in order to help our younger colleagues in physical anthropology in understanding the current trends and to provide them with suggestions for their future work. The scientific program consisted of six plenary sessions (Evolutional Theories in Human Origin; Changes in Genetic Profile of Ancient and Living Populations; Human Ecology - Priorities for the 21 st Century; Screening for Health and Disease - Growth and Aging; Kinanthropometry - Functional and Physiological Anthropology; New Perspectives in the Disciplines of Biological Anthropology) and seven symposia (Human Evolution; Paleo anthropology and Paleopathology; Human Population Genetics and Biodemography; Human Growth and Development Human Ecology - Human Nutrition; Health and Disease in Past and Present Populations; Functional and Physiological Anthropology; Human Diversity and Biocultural Researches). Poster sessions were also organized for all the topics of symposia and applied anthropology. Altogether 247 participants from 25 European and 14 non-European countries contributed to the congress in some way. As usual, the last day of the congress involved a meeting of the General Assembly of the EAA at which the Board informed on the officials newly elected. A special item of the agenda was Professor Leslie Aiello's presentation on the objectives of the Wenner-Gren Foundation.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Ravosa, Matthew Jordan

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Northwestern U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 27, 2001
Project Title: 
Ravosa, Dr. Matthew J., Northwestern U. Medical School, Chicago, IL - To aid conference on primate origins and adaptations, 2001, Northwestern U., in collaboration with Dr. Marian Dagosto

'Primate Origins and Adaptations,' December 13-15, 2001, Chicago, Illinois -- Organizers: Matthew J. Ravosa and Marian Dagosto (Northwestern University). Recent discoveries of fossil primates from the Eocene (36-55 mya) of Europe, North America, Asia, and Africa have greatly increased our knowledge of the diversity of the first primates as well as documenting a far broader spectrum of adaptations and body sizes than sampled previously. Not surprisingly, there have been increased attempts to ascertain primate affinities vis-a-vis other living and extinct mammals, coupled with increased museum, field, laboratory, and experimental work on outstanding problems surrounding primate origins. Our international conference and accompanying edited volume offered the first-ever forum for the integration of recent and ongoing research on the adaptive significance of major anatomical and behavioral transformations during this important and interesting stage of primate evolution. Over three days, 22 speakers, 19 discussants and 11 students presented research and/or participated in small-group discussions regarding morphological and molecular evidence on primate taxonomy; function of grasping digits with nails; locomotor and postural behaviors; orbital form, visual neuroanatomy, and feeding behavior; postorbital bar formation; masticatory biomechanics and dietary shifts; biogeography and antiquity; metabolism; socioecology; encephalization; and life-history variation. To benefit the Chicago academic community, local faculty, postdocs and students participated. To increase dissemination of ideas/concepts and facilitate interaction among several generations of researchers, students from under-represented groups attended.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Ellison, George TH

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
London, U. of
Status: 
Lapsed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 30, 2002
Project Title: 
Ellison, Dr. George, U. of London, London, UK- To aid conference on ethics in human biology: diversity, difference, and deviance, 2002, U. of London, in collaboration with Dr. Alan Goodman
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$4,806

Tallman, Paula Skye

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Northwestern U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 22, 2012
Project Title: 
Tallman, Paula Skye, Northwestern U., Evanston, IL - To aid research on 'Stress, Health, and Physiological Functioning in the Awajun of the Peruvian Amazon' supervised by Dr. Thomas W. McDade

Preliminary abstract: Road construction, colonization programs, and deforestation have precipitated rapid cultural and economic transitions in many regions of the Amazon rainforest. A major issue of scholarly and public interest is whether these changes are influencing the quality of life of people living in indigenous communities within these areas. The Awajun are an Amerindian group living in the northern highland rainforest of the Peruvian Amazon. Many Awajun communities are located near major highways and booming frontier towns, facilitating rapid social change and potentially creating new psychological stressors. This dissertation research will investigate: 1.) the aspects of life that the Awajun find stressful, 2.) how these stressors are related to reported mental and physical health, and 3.) how stressors, mental, and physical health are linked with physiological functioning. This project will investigate these questions using a critical biocultural approach that combines theory and methods from both medical and biocultural anthropology.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$24,666

Hailemeskel, Getenet W.

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Queens College, City U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
July 29, 2003
Project Title: 
Hailemeskel, Getenet, Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Organization, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - To aid training in anthropology at Queens College-CUNY, Flushing, NY, supervised by Dr. Larissa Swedell
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Vietnam National University, Hanoi

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Vietnam National U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 29, 2011
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Vietnam National University, Hanoi, Vietnam - Institutional Development Grant

Vietnam National University-Hanoi is widely recognized as a leading university in Vietnam. Being one of its key research and training units, our Department of Anthropology has faculty members trained both in ethnology in Vietnam and Eastern Europe, and in Western anthropology. The aim of our Department of Anthropology is to become the leading center for anthropological reesearch and training in Vietnam, and through this process, to contribute to the development of a strong academic discipline of anthropology in Vietnam. Towards that objective, we want to pioneer to create a doctoral training program in social and cultural anthropology, which also includes the creation of a research-oriented academic environment, faculty and student training, and acquiring adequate learning resources to enhance the teaching and research capactiy of the department.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Jacobs, Sue-Ellen

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
January 25, 2011
Project Title: 
Jacobs, Sue-Ellen, Ohkay Owingeh, NM - To aid preparation of personal research materials for deposit with Special Collection University of Washington Libraries, Seattle, WA, and National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Natal, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 12, 2005
Project Title: 
Leclerc-Madlala, Dr. Suzanne, U. of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa - To aid conference of ASA on 'Southern African Anthropology in the Context of Globalisation: The Way Forward,' 2005, Durban, in collaboration with Dr. Anand Singh

'Anthropology Southern Africa (ASA) 2005 Conference,' September 22-24, 2005, Durban, South Africa -- Organizers: Suzanne Leclerc-Madlala (University of KwaZulu-Natal) and Anand Singh. The annual conference of Anthropology Southern Africa was hosted by the Department of Anthropology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College in Durban. Under the theme 'Continuity, Change and Transformation: Anthropology in the 21st Century,' approximately 175 scholars attended the conference, which drew from a pool of academic contributions from university staff, students and practitioners in the field, where the latest trends in research and pedagogy in anthropology were discussed and debated. Three exciting keynote speakers with expertise in areas that are currently of critical importance in Southern Africa and globally -- transformations in tertiary education, terrorism, and HIV/AIDS -- set the tone for the entire conference, which included the delivery of 61 scholarly papers. The conference closed with an AGM, where new office bearers for ASA were chosen and plans for next year's joint ASA-Pan African Association of Anthropologists were finalized.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Addis Ababa University

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Addis Ababa U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 22, 2012
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - Institutional Development Grant

The Department of Social Anthropology at Addis Ababa University launched a Ph.D program in 2010 on its own. In collaboration with anthropology departments in Europe, US, and Japan, the Department now intends to improve the theoretical and methodological training of Ph.D. students. The IDG grant will be used to intensify international exposure and exchange; improve the quality of anthropological training by bringing in experienced guest lectuerers and disseration co-advisors and examiners; upgrade the current curriculum in consultation with partner institutions; provide modest support for student field research; and build up the library and electronic resources. Ethiopia has a great need for highly trained anthropologists in academic and non-academic positions and the IDG will help the Depar