Patil, Crystal L.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2008
Project Title: 
Patil, Dr. Crystal L., U. of Illinois, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'A Biocultural Examination of the Peripartum Period'

DR. CRYSTAL L. PATIL, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, was awarded funding in April 2008, to aid research on 'A Biocultural Examination of the Peripartum Period.' Fieldwork was carried out from May-August in 2009 and 2010, among subsistence agriculturalists living in north-central Tanzania. Using a mixed-methods ethnographically-informed protocol the project examined: 1) the patterning of the peripartum; and 2) nodes of decision-making around place of birth. The study compared narratives collected from women, traditional and biomedical health practitioners, health administrators and support staff, and community leaders, and observed births in the hospital. Sociopolitical, economic, and environmental conditions were discussed and themes emerging from these interviews were integrated into a community-level survey. Three villages, at various distances from the hospital were included in the survey. Targeted follow-up interviews were conducted to better understand nodes in the pathway of decision-making in birth. In addition to publications, these results will be integrated into policy briefs and presented to the community for use in local policy-making in hopes of reducing maternal mortality.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$24,575

Gettler, Lee Thomas

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Northwestern U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2010
Project Title: 
Gettler, Lee Thomas, Northwestern U., Evanston, IL - To aid research on 'Longitudinal Perspectives on Paternal Socioendocrinology in the Philippines,' supervised by Dr. Christopher Kuzawa

LEE T. GETTLER, then a student at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, was awarded funding in May 2010 to aid research on 'Longitudinal Perspectives on Paternal Socioendocriniology in the Philippines,' supervised by Dr. Christopher Kuzawa. Much prior research has been conducted on the neuroendocrine underpinnings of maternal care, but much less is known about paternal socioendocrinology, particularly among human males. This research is the first to demonstrate that fatherhood causally decreases testosterone in human males. The finding that fathers involved in high levels of childcare have lower testosterone also adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that suppression of testosterone by fatherhood is potentially mediated through paternal care. Finally, these data represent one of the few evaluations of human paternal prolactin, especially in the context of short-term, father-child interaction. Prolactin is likely an important hormone influencing expression of paternal care behaviors in men, but it has been given substantially less attention in studies of male socioendocrinology, relative to, for example, testosterone. The findings that first-time fathers and those who feel support by their wives show greater declines in prolactin when interacting with their children provide important insights on the plasticity of human male physiology as men move through different life history stages and priorities shift. In total, this research presents multiple lines of evidence that behavior/personality influence biology and vice versa, reflecting the mutually-regulatory, interactive relationship between behavior and biology.

Publication Credit:

Gettler, Lee T., Sonny S. Agustin, and Christopher W. Kuzawa. 2010. Testosterone, Physical Activity, and Somatic Outcomes Among Filipino Males. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 142(4):590-599.

Gettler, Lee T., Thomas W. McDade, Sonny S. Agustin, and Christopher W. Kuzawa. 2011. Short-Term Changes in Fathers' Hormones during Father-Child Play: Impacts of Paternal Attitudes and Experience. Hormones and Behavior 60(5):599-606.

Gettler, Lee T., Thomas W. McDade, Alan B. Feranil, and Christopher W. Kuzawa. 2011. Longitudinal Evidence that Fatherhood Decreases Testosterone in Human Males. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, USA 108(39):16194-16199.

Gettler, Lee T., Thomas W. McDade, Alan B. Feranil, and Christopher W. Kuzawa. 2012. Prolactin, Fatherhood, and Reproductive Behavior in Human Males. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 148(3):362-370.

Gettler, Lee T., James J. McKenna, Thomas W. McDade, et al. 2012. Does Cosleeping Contribute to Lower Testosterone Levels in Fathers? Evidence from the Philippines. PLOS One 7(9):1-11,

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$11,240

Astorino, Claudia Marie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Herbert H. Lehman College, City U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2013
Project Title: 
Astorino, Claudia Marie, City U. of New York, Lehman College, New York, NY - To aid research on 'Does Human Sex Indicator Morphology in the Skull Co-vary With Age and Ancestry?,' supervised by Dr. Eric Delson

CLAUDIA MARIE ASTORINO, then a student at City University of New York, Lehman College, New York, New York, was awarded a grant in April 2013 to aid research on 'Does Human Sex Indicator Morphology in the Skull Co-vary with Age and Ancestry,' supervised by Dr. Eric Delson. The human skeleton exhibits sexual dimorphism, or differences in physical form between males and females of the same species. This dissertation project investigates how sex, age, and ancestry inform the shape and size of sexually dimorphic features of the skull in recent modern humans. The research phase supported by this grant enabled 3D laser scans to be collected from a large, documented collection of skulls from both domestic and international skeletal collections. Over 300 adults and 50 subadults were scanned at the Smithsonian National Museum of National History (Washington, D.C.), Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle (Paris, France), University of Coimbra (Portugal), University of Bologna (Italy), and the University of Dundee (Scotland). Differences among human groups defined by sex, age, and/or ancestry were investigated by placing curves of 3D points on the surface of the laser scans and comparing their positions among groups of specimens. This study will help to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the range of sexual dimorphism in the recent modern human skull.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$19,941

Garruto, Ralph M.

Grant Type: 
Engaged Anthropology Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Binghamton, State U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
August 26, 2015
Project Title: 
Garruto, Dr. Ralph, State U. of New York, Binghamton, NY - To aid engauged activities on 'Using Anthropology to Build Research Capacity and Inform Public Health Policy in the Republic of Vanuatu,' 2016, Vanuatu

Preliminary abstract: The Republic of Vanuatu, an island nation in the South Pacific, is undergoing a rapid health transition as the result of modernization and accompanying changes in diet, activity, and lifestyle. Our previous research has demonstrated that obesity is rapidly incresing in prevalence in urban areas, and that rural areas with tourism are at risk due to rapid culture change, including increased access to processed and packaged foods. The goals of our engagement project are four-fold: 1) To inform the Ministry of Health of our findings in order to stimulate the development of targeted intervention strategies; 2) to provide training in anthropometrics, statistics and survey techniques to Ministry of Health workers in order to facilitate wider surveillance of health transition in Vanuatu; 3) to inform community members in the urban capital, Port Vila, of our findings through public forums held in community centers; 4) to disseminate our results to rural areas and islands through community presentations and the creation of informative posters on the health transition, obesity, hypertension and associated risk behaviors, smoking, alcohol and other drug use, to be posted at community centers and first-aid posts; and 5) at the request of the government, to develop a plan to build research capacity for the nation.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$5,000

Dufour, Darna L.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Colorado, Boulder, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 8, 2004
Project Title: 
Dufour, Dr. Darna L., U. of Colorado, Boulder, CO - To aid research on 'Work Efficiency in Lactating Women'

DR. DARNA L. DUFOUR, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, was awarded a grant in July 2004 to aid research on 'Work Efficiency in Lactating Women.' Lactation is the most costly phase of reproduction for human females and can increase a women's energy needs by 30 percent. Women can potentially meet this increase in energy needs by increasing their food energy intake, decreasing their physical activity and/or utilizing their body fat stores. This study examined a fourth way women can potentially meet their increased energy needs in lactation, that is by an increase in work (metabolic) efficiency in exercise. A sample of exclusively breastfeeding women was recruited and their work efficiency in exercise measured at peak lactation (3-4 months postpartum) and then again after weaning. Work efficiency in exercise was measured as delta efficiency (the ratio of work accomplished to energy needed to accomplish that work) using a submaximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. The results demonstrated that delta efficiency is significantly higher at peak lactation than after weaning. Further, delta efficiency at peak lactation was significantly higher than in a control sample of non-pregnant, non-lactating women. These findings suggest that in addition to increased food energy intake, decreased physical activity and the utilization of fat stores, women can compensate for the extra energy demands of lactation through increases in work efficiency.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$14,000

Eaves-Johnson, K. Lindsay

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Iowa, U. of
Status: 
Lapsed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 7, 2008
Project Title: 
Eaves-Johnson, K. Lindsay, U. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA - To aid research on 'A Spirometric and Geo-Morphometric Baseline for the Study of Thoracic Patterning in Fossil Homo,' supervised by Dr. Robert Gary Franciscus

Preliminary abstract: Due to a general, though undocumented, sense that little diagnostic information can be gleaned from them, ribs and overall thoracic morphology have been comparatively understudied relative to other anatomical regions in human paleontology. This study tests the influence of skeletal thoracic shape on respiratory variables (e.g., total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, etc.) using computed tomography (CT), to expand our understanding of modern and Neandertal thoracic patterning. The mixed-sex CT sample consists of 50 respiratorily normal subjects and 10 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), all between the ages of 20 and 60 (IRB: 199708651). This homogenous, living CT sample is compared with a regionally heterogeneous, mixed-sex skeletal sample from the extremes of human variation (n=134), as well as the Neandertal specimens Kebara 2, Tabun C1, Shanidar 3, and La Chapelle. Preliminary results suggest that, while gross spirometric measures, such as total lung capacity agree well with the predicted model, further study is needed to delineate the skeletal parameters most amenable to comparison for such variables as functional residual capacity. Additionally, comparisons of the Levantine Neandertals with the modern sample fail to demonstrate any significant temporal excursion from the range of modern variability with respect to these parameters.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$13,473

Kreager, Philip

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 1, 2010
Project Title: 
Kreager, Dr. Philip, Oxford U., Oxford, UK - To aid workshop on 'Population in the Human Sciences: Concepts, Models, Evidence,' 2011, Oxford, in collaboration with Dr. Stanley Ulijaszek

Preliminary abstract: The workshop addresses the need for review and assessment of the framework of interdisciplinary population studies. Limits to prevailing postwar paradigms like the Evolutionary Synthesis and Demographic Transition were becoming evident by the 1970s. Subsequent decades have witnessed an immense expansion of population modelling and related empirical inquiry, with new genetic developments that have reshaped evolutionary, population, and developmental biology. The rise of anthropological and historical demography, and social network analysis, have played major roles in rethinking modern and earlier population history. More recently, the emergence of sub-disciplines like biodemography and evolutionary anthropology, and growing links between evolutionary and developmental biology, indicate a growing convergence biological and social approaches to population. New modelling techniques, particularly relating to network analysis, are applied across these several fields, and at several levels of analysis. The several developments have not, however, displaced the older paradigms and the concepts and methods of population analysis on which they rested. Current developments often coexist uneasily with them. The workshop is designed to bring together researchers at the forefront of these developments, drawing on their and related work to consider current concepts and practices used to construct and analyse populations. Discussion will emphasize comparison of similarities and differences amongst models, methods and concepts; potential cross-fertilisation of research; and whether a new cohesive framework for population studies is emerging. The workshop marks the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Human Sciences Programme at Oxford, and of the symposium on population supported by Wenner-Gren that was held at that time. Proceedings of this workshop, like its predecessor, will be published.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Quinn, Elizabeth Anne

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2013
Project Title: 
Quinn, Dr. Elizabeth Anne, Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid research on 'Milk with Altitude: Investigations Into Milk Composition and Physiology Among Tibetans'

DR. ELIZABETH A. QUINN, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, received funding in April 2013 to aid research on 'Milk with Altitude: Investigations into Milk Composition and Physiology among Tibetans.' This project was designed to specifically investigate the hypotheses that altitude would have an effect on milk composition among high altitude adapted ethnic Tibetans living in Nepal. Milk samples were collected from 130 mothers, with detailed anthropometrics collected on both mothers and infants. As predicted, there was no association between altitude and milk macronutrients or energy, although milk fat was much higher than reported by previous studies. Milk adiponectin did show a dose dependent association with altitude but not maternal body composition, while maternal body fat predicted milk leptin content. Older infants and toddlers in Nubri had significantly lower weight for age z-scores compared to toddlers in Kathmandu (-1.85 vs. -0.36). There were no associations between milk leptin or adiponectin and infant weight for age z-score in Nubri, but both leptin and adiponectin were inversely associated with weight for age z-score in Kathmandu. It appears that the ecological pressures of altitude (hypoxia, marginal nutrition, thermal stress, radiation stress) may have significantly stronger influences on infant weight among high altitude living populations than hormonal signals in milk. In Kathmandu, with many of these external stressors removed, the associations between these hormones and weight for age are present.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Gettler, Lee Thomas

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Notre Dame, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 5, 2015
Project Title: 
Gettler, Dr. Lee Thomas, U. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN - To aid research and writing on 'Shaping Fatherhood: The Role of Cultural Institutions, Development, & Biological Variation in Cross-Generational Parenting Patterns' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary abstract: In Cebu (Philippines), fathers have recently increased their involvement in childcare, i.e. contemporary fathers perform more caregiving than did their fathers. This shift might relate to political economic forces that affected labor and migration. Framed in this context, my analyses here focus on human genetic variation, testosterone (T), and multiple generations of familial caregiving and demographic data from Cebu. I will explore how neuroendocrine pathways (related to the biology of fatherhood) are shaped through both early life experiences of caregiving as well as inherited genetic traits. Based on the observation that those neuroendocrine pathways can help mediate new expressions of adult behavior, I will assess the effects of these early life experiences on men's later behavior and biology as parents. I will interlace physiology, social interactions, and political economy, to understand the niches in which behavioral patterns are maintained or shifted across generations. I will produce articles that will test: (a) how between-father genetic variation affects their T responses to fatherhood; (b) how political economic factors affect the investments of alloparental caregivers, with downstream impacts on fathers' caregiving and hormonal profiles; and (c) how the involvement of men's fathers in childcare affects their own caregiving and T responses to parenthood.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Arps, Shahna L.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Ohio State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 13, 2004
Project Title: 
Arps, Shahna L., Ohio State U., Columbus, OH - To aid research on 'Maternal Mortality and Morbidity among the Miskito of Eastern Honduras,' supervised by Dr. Douglas E. Crews

SHAHNA L. ARPS, then a student at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, was awarded a grant in October 2004 to aid research on 'Maternal Mortality and Morbidity among the Miskito of Eastern Honduras,' supervised by Dr. Douglas E. Crews. Fieldwork was conducted in Honduras (November 2004 - November 2005) to explore maternal health issues in Miskito communities along the Ibans lagoon in the department of Gracias a Dios. Focus groups, structured interviews, and health assessments provided data regarding the cultural, biological, behavioral, and socioeconomic factors that influence maternal morbidity and mortality. To investigate health among living women, reproductive histories and information on current health, household composition, and socioeconomic status were collected during initial interviews with 200 women. Follow- up interviews were conducted to investigate dietary intake, workload/activity, social support, decision-making (autonomy), episodes of illness, and health-seeking behavior. Verbal autopsies were also collected from family members to analyze causes and circumstances of maternal deaths in the region. Women reported 55 maternal deaths. Hemorrhage, usually due to prolonged labor or retained placenta, was the leading cause of death. Poverty, women's lack of autonomy, and inadequate access to health care interact in complex ways to produce compromised health and maternal mortality in Miskito communities. This research demonstrates the need for new maternal health initiatives in the region. It also contributes to an understanding of human adaptability and limits to adaptability in high-risk environments.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$19,300
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