James, Paul E.

Approve Date
Grant Year
2004

PAUL E. JAMES, then a student at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, received funding in January 2004 to aid research on 'The Disease of Ecology of Asthma in the Migrant Mixtec Population,' supervised by Dr. Magdalena Hurtado. What was an adaptive immune response to intestinal parasites in our agrarian past may underlie the current rise in childhood asthma among urban and acculturated populations.

Indriati, Etty

Approve Date
Grant Year
2008

DR. ETTY INDRIATI, Gadjah Mada University, Jakarta, Indonesia, and DR. WILLIAM LEONARD, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, were awarded an International Collaborative Research Grant to aid collaborative research on 'Energetic Nutritional and Dental Health of Foragers Orang Rimba in the Sumatran Forest, Indonesia.' This research examined dietary consumption, energy expenditure, body size, and other health measures in 85 men and 115 women agriculturists from Ngilo-Ilo, East Java.

Howells, Michaela Emily

Approve Date
Grant Year
2011

MICHAELA E. HOWELLS, then a student at University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, was awarded funding in April 2011 to aid research on 'The Impact of Psychosocial Stress on Gestation Length and Pregnancy Outcomes in American Samoa,' supervised by Dr. Darna Dufour. The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between chronic maternal psychosocial stress on spontaneous abortion, gestation length, and neonate body size.

Howells, Michaela Emily

Approve Date
Grant Year
2015

DR. MICHAELA HOWELLS, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, North Carolina, received funding in March 2015 to aid engaged activities on 'Promoting Dialog between Health Care Providers and Pregnant Women on American Samoa.' There is a lack of culturally salient, bilingual health education materials in American Samoa. The available education materials are mostly written in English and featured white people, a minority on island. According to the resident health care professionals, these materials failed to reflect Samoan culture and thus missed an important opportunity to educate women.

Houck, Kelly Marie

Approve Date
Grant Year
2014

KELLY HOUCK, then a graduate student at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, was awarded funding in April 2014 to aid research on 'A New Dual Burden Life History Theory Application Exploring Childhood Gut Immune Function and Overnutrition,' supervised by Dr. Amanda Thompson. The emerging field of gut microbiota contributes to anthropological concerns by providing a new pathway to examine the effects of pathogenic, nutritional, and social environments on human physiology and consequently human variation.

Hoke, Morgan Kathleen

Approve Date
Grant Year
2014

MORGAN K. HOKE, then a graduate student at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, was awarded funding in April 2014 to aid research on 'Changing Economic Activity, Infant Feeding, and Early Growth among the Quechua of Nuñoa, Peru,' supervised by Dr. William Leonard. This project examines the major influences on infant feeding practices, nutrition, and early growth and health in the south-central highlands of Nuñoa, Peru.

Hodges-Simeon, Carolyn Randolph

Approve Date
Grant Year
2010

CAROLYN R. HODGES-SIMEON, then a student at University of California, Santa Barbara, California, was awarded a grant in October 2010 to aid research on 'Life History Trade-Offs Affecting the Development of Human Sexual Dimorphism,' supervised by Dr. Steven J. Gaulin. The human vocal voice is sexually dimorphic in two primary ways: males have lower 'fundamental frequency' (F0, the perceptual correlate of which is 'pitch') and more closely spaced 'formant position' (Pf; also termed 'resonance').

Hazel, Mary-Ashley

Approve Date
Grant Year
2015

Preliminary abstract: Migration and other forms of human mobility contribute to the global transmission dynamics of infectious diseases. The act of being mobile--of spending significant amounts of time in different locations and environments--influences the patterns of a person's social contacts. Although some pandemic disease spread is driven by mobility that spans vast distances and requires only brief and or even indirect contact (e.g.

Guilfoyle, Meagan Marie

Approve Date
Grant Year
2016

Preliminary abstract: Ramadan is a cultural practice that has potentially profound effects on human biology, particularly on nursing mothers and infants. During the month of Ramadan, nursing Muslim women around the world participate in a fast in which no food or water is consumed from sunrise to sunset. Little is known about how this fast influences breast milk composition or infant feeding practices, and, although infants are not subject to fasting, these changes could in turn affect infant growth, development and health.