Oyhenart, Evelia Edith

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2008

'Tenth Meeting of the Latin American Association of Biological Anthropology'
October 20-23, 2008, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Organizers: Evelia E. Oyhenart (U. Nacional de La Plata) and Hector M. Pucciarelli (Museo de la Plata, Buenos Aires)

Noback, Marlijn Lisanne

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2011

MARLIJN NOBACK, then a student at Eberhard Karls University, Tubingen, Germany, was awarded a grant in April 2011 to aid research on 'Climate- and Diet-Related Variation in Human Functional Cranial Components,' supervised by Dr. Katerina Harvati. This study seeks to elucidate the physiological basis of craniofacial variation and the selective forces driving modern human cranial geographic diversity. Funding enabled the CT scanning of 45 individual crania from three different collections based in Paris, London, and Tübingen.

Nelson, Robin Gair

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Grant Year
2011

DR. ROBIN G. NELSON, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York, was awarded a grant in April 2011 to aid research on 'Residential Context, Non-Kin Care and Child Health Outcomes in Jamaica.' This study explores the relationship between residential context, parental investment, and child health outcomes in Jamaica. It centers on an examination of the growth and development of children living in state-sponsored homes, and children who are living with biological family members.

Miller, Elizabeth Marie

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2015

Preliminary abstract: Biological anthropologists hypothesize that early life microbial exposures are critical for the development of the immune system, with the evolved flexibility of the human immune response helping acclimate infants to their unique environment. One major pathway to exposure is via mothers' milk, which passes microbes to infants via breast milk in a dynamic, co-influential system.

Middleton, Emily Ruth

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2013

EMILY R. MIDDLETON, then a student at New York University, New York, New York, received funding in April 2013 to aid research on 'Ecogeographical Influences on Trunk Modularity in Recent Humans: Colonization and Morphological Integration,' supervised by Dr. Susan C. Antón. The ribcage, vertebral column, and pelvis have undergone numerous shape changes throughout hominin evolutionary history, responding to a wide suite of locomotor, obstetric, and climatic selective pressures.

Melby, Melissa Kathleen

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Grant Year
2008

DR. MELISSA K. MELBY, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo, Japan was awarded a grant in October 2008 to aid research on 'Developmental Origins of Metabolic Syndrome: Study Utilizing the Japanese Maternal and Child Health Handbook.' The 'Developmental Origins of Health and Disease' hypothesis posits that in utero stress such as nutritional restriction resulting in low birth weight (LBW) increases later life risk of metabolic-syndrome related disease. Understanding risk factors for LBW thus has implications for later life health.

McHale, Timothy Sean

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2016

Preliminary abstract: The aim of the proposed research is to investigate steroid hormone response to physical and non-physical forms of male-male competition among juvenile boys in Hong Kong. The goal of this research is to provide novel insights into the proximate mechanisms that mediate competitive social behavior in boys and to assess the factors that potentially contribute to acute reactive changes of adrenal steroid hormones during juvenile development.

McCabe, Collin Michael

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2014

Preliminary abstract: Rodents have inhabited human settlements since at least the advent of agriculture and sedentary lifestyles. This close contact between humans and rodents has been, and still is, a source of many emerging zoonotic diseases. However, little is known about what drives species to commensal lifestyles, and even less is known about whether these commensal species are more likely than non-commensal rodents to carry novel zoonotic pathogens.

Maxfield, Amanda Leigh

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2015

Preliminary abstract: Food insecurity-- uncertain access to sufficient food to maintain a healthy and active life-- negatively affects both physical and mental wellbeing. The majority of research on food insecurity focuses on the biological value of food for health, but food has both biological and cultural importance for humans. This project will examine the role that the social meaning of food plays in linking food insecurity to mental wellbeing.

Masterson, Erin Elizabeth

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2014

Preliminary abstract: Like a window into the past, adult teeth may reflect early childhood ecology. Dental enamel on the permanent maxillary incisors calcifies incrementally during early childhood (0-5 years of age), is highly-sensitive to biological stress, and doesn't repair over the life course. Developmental defects in the enamel (DDE) are caused by metabolic disruption during development, including micronutrient deficiency, gastrointestinal disturbance, and bacterial and viral infections.