Gibson, Roger

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 25, 2008
Project Title: 
Gibson, Roger, Middletown, MD - To aid preparation of the papers and research materials of Dr. Gordon D. Gibson for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Wintle, Pamela

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 21, 2007
Project Title: 
Wintle, Dr. Pamela, Human Studies Film Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Dr. John Marshall -- Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Scie

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 19, 2010
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Manchester, UK (through IUAES org. John Gledhill) - To aid '17th Congress of the IUAES: Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds,' 2013, Manchester

'Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds: The 17th Congress of the International Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences'
August 5-10, 2013, Manchester University, Manchester, United Kingdom
Organizer: Dr. John Gledhill (Manchester U.)

This truly global congress brought together 1260 anthropologists from sixty-five countries to present 1283 papers in 211 parallel session panels, which successfully promoted dialogue between scholars from different countries and across sub-field boundaries. This networking will be consolidated in the future through the system of IUAES commissions that was reinvigorated at the event. The use of thematic tracks for the parallel sessions worked well in producing innovative and focused panels, the Museum Anthropology track involved international conversations that included countries such as China, and the Visual Anthropology program included several imaginative complements to the normal film-screenings and panel presentations. Wenner-Gren's central role in the promotion of world anthropology and the IUAES was entertainingly presented in Leslie Aiello's inaugural keynote address. Lourdes Arizpe and Howard Morphy gave additional keynotes sponsored by ASA and RAI respectively. Three plenaries consisted of debates between four key speakers, with additional audience participation, another well-received innovation that sharpened the presentation of issues and ensured global diversity amongst the plenary speakers. The final plenary was a panel discussion on World Anthropologies. This and two other panels were sponsored by WCAA. Edited videos of the plenary sessions are now available on YouTube, and various print publications are also in preparation.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Laderman, Michael

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 11, 2012
Project Title: 
Laderman, Michael, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Carol Laderman for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$3,950

Minks, Amanda Gail

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 7, 2002
Project Title: 
Minks, Amanda, Columbia U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'Expressive Practices and Identity Formation among Miskitu Children,' supervised by Dr. Aaron A. Fox

AMANDA MINKS, while a student at Columbia University, New York, New York, received funding in June 2002 to aid research on 'Expressive Practices and Identity Formation among Miskitu Children,' supervised by Dr. Aaron A. Fox. In the past thirty years, Miskitu Indians have migrated in increasing numbers from mainland Nicaragua to Com Island, off the Caribbean coast. This migration has transformed the social and political landscape of the island, which, since the nineteenth century, has been populated primarily by English-speaking Creole people. Also transformed are the expressive and socializing practices of Miskitu islanders. The aim of the research supported by Wenner-Gren was to document the repertoires of Miskitu children's expressive practices across a range of contexts, providing a lens on shifting processes of socialization among peers and across generations. The term expressive practices encompasses a range of interrelated communicative activities (musical, linguistic, and kinetic) approached from the perspectives of style, performance, and poetics. The imagination is key not only in terms of children's play activities, but also in terms of developing social imaginaries that construct ties among people across time and space. Children were observed in formal socializing contexts, such as the school and the church, as well as the informal contexts of home and outdoor play spaces. Audio recordings of children's interaction were transcribed in collaboration with Miskitu consultants, and interviews were conducted with adults dealing with topics such as migration histories, gender roles, socialization practices, religion, and labor. This research attempts to make connections between the large-scale political and economic forces that are radically changing Com Island's social structure, and the small-scale interactions in which children are socialized - and socialize one another - in a multilingual, culturally diverse environment.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$11,000

Baker, Brenda Jane

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 31, 2011
Project Title: 
Baker, Dr. Brenda, Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ - To aid workshop on 'Disruptions as a Cause and Consequence of Migration in Human History,' 2012, Saguaro Lake Ranch, Mesa, AZ, in collaboration with Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda

'Disruptions as a Cause and Consequence of Migration in Human History'
May 3-5, 2011, Saguaro Lake Ranch, Mesa, Arizona
Organizers: Dr. Brenda Baker & Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda (Arizona State U.)

Migration has been integral to the development of human societies since the emergence of our species and has continuously reshaped the economic, ethnic, and political dynamics of various societies over time, yet little dialogue has occurred between scholars examining contemporary and past migrations. This workshop was intended to stimulate an intellectual exchange among sociocultural anthropologists, archaeologists, bioarchaeologists, and others who study migration to analyze the extent to which environmental and social disruptions have been a cause of migration over time and whether these migratory flows have in turn led to disruptive consequences for the societies that receive them. Another goal was to help develop an understanding of common processes operating in past and present migrations. An initial conceptual framework developed by a collaborative group of faculty from Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change was circulated to workshop participants to help guide articulation with common themes and stimulate discussion. Presentations and lively discussions were geared toward developing our understanding of the relationship between disruptions and population displacements from prehistory to the present. This workshop has resulted in the submission of revised papers for publication in an edited volume.

Publication credit:

Baker, Brenda J., and Takeyuki Tsuda (eds.) 2015. Migration & Disruptions: Toward a Unifying Theory of Ancient and Contemporary Migrations. University of Florida Press: Gainesville.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Ruby, Jay

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 31, 2010
Project Title: 
Ruby, Dr. Jay, Temple U., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - To aid preparation of the Jay Ruby Visual Anthropology Papers for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$5,500

Edwards, Terra

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 3, 2010
Project Title: 
Edwards, Terra, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'Language, Embodiment, and Sociality in a Tactile Life-world: Communication Practices in Everyday Life among Deaf-Blind People in Seattle, Washington,' supervised by Dr. William F. Hanks

TERRA EDWARDS, then a student at the University of California, Berkeley, California, was awarded funding in May 2010, to aid research on 'Language, Embodiment, and Sociality in a Tactile Life-World: Communication Practices in Everyday Life among Deaf-Blind People in Seattle, Washington,' supervised by Dr. William F. Hanks. This project investigates language and communication practices in a community in Seattle, Washington, whose members are born deaf and, due to a genetic condition, lose their vision slowly. Most members grew up using visual American Sign Language (ASL). Upon moving to Seattle, they transition to a tactile mode of reception of ASL. Until recently, this transition was treated as a compensatory strategy. Thus, a single interaction often occurred in two different modalities: a sighted or partially sighted person would use visual reception, while their blind interlocutor used tactile reception. Despite this variation, it remained normative to organize access to the immediate environment along visual lines. Therefore, the more a person moved away from visual practices and orientations, the more reliant on interpreters they became. Then, in 2007, a 'pro-tactile' social movement took hold, calling for the cultivation of tactile dispositions regardless of sensory capacity. Once everyone-blind, sighted, and partially sighted- 'went tactile,' relations between linguistic forms and the social and physical environment were reconfigured and new grammatical sub-systems began to emerge. Ongoing research aims to understand how linguistic forms derived from visual ASL are calibrated to the contours of this emergent tactile world, yielding an emergent, tactile language.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$13,933

Sutton, Constance R.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 9, 2001
Project Title: 
Sutton, Dr. Constance, New York U., New York, NY - To aid oral-history interviews with select members of the International Women's Anthropology Conference and New York Women's Anthropology Conference
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$1,273

Gjording, Karin Jane

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
Gjording, Karin Jane, San Francisco, CA - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Chris Gjording for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2008