Hewlett, Christopher Erik

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
St. Andrews, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 21, 2015
Project Title: 
Hewlett, Dr. Christopher E., Charlottesville, VA - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Joanna Overing for archival deposit with the University Library at the University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$6,930

Strand, Thea Randina

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Strand, Thea Randina, U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid 'Varieties in Dialogue: A Historical and Ethnographic Study of Dialect Use and Shift in Rural Norway,' supervised by Dr. Jane H. Hill

THEA R. STRAND, then a student at University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Varieties in Dialogue: A Historical and Ethnographic Study of Dialect Use and Shift in Rural Norway,' supervised by Dr. Jane H. Hill. This research investigates the relationships between dialect use, language ideologies, and rural identities in the rural Norwegian valley of Valdres, as well as the direction of contemporary local dialect shift relative to the competing written norms of Bokmål and Nynorsk. During ethnographic fieldwork in 2007-2008, recordings of dialect use were collected from metalinguistic interviews, casual conversations, theater performances, and national media appearances by dialect speakers. Based on these recordings, as well as participant observation, this study combines an analysis of dominant discourses and ideologies of language with the close linguistic analysis of accent and grammatical forms associated with the Valdres dialect. Additionally, a long-term historical perspective is incorporated in order to explore the ways in which the 150-year history of language planning and struggle in Norway has contributed to the development of the contemporary linguistic situation. While previous research in Valdres has indicated long-term change in the direction of normative, regional urban speech, a central finding of this study is that dialect change today appears to be multi-directional -- both toward standard, urban Norwegian, and, simultaneously, toward new, markedly rural forms. The latter kind of change is clearly supported by local ideologies that have recently revalued rural culture, identity, and language.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$6,335

National University of Mongolia

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National U. of Mongolia
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - Institutional Development Grant

The main aim of the project is to radically upgrade the institutional capacity of the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, National University of Mongolia, in order to make the department an institution that offers internationally sound anthropological research and training in Mongolia, and thus establish the field of socio-cultural anthropology in Mongolia firmly. The specific objectives of the project are to (1) develop a sound doctoral program that meets international standards, (2) train 4 new doctorates jointly with the Mongolian and Inner Asian Studies Unit (MIASU) and the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge, and recruit these doctorates as faculty members in the Department, (3) build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance technical capacity of the department.

Mongolian and Cambridge professors will set up a joint committee and design and develop a doctoral program. Four Mongolian and four Cambridge professors will take part in designing and developming of doctoral program and courses. They will mainly work through internet, however, Mongolian professors will visit the Cambridge University. Four Mongolian professors will work at MIASU in total of 7 months while developing ten doctoral courses.

In order to radically enhance the department's research and teaching capacity the Department will select four doctoral candidates for a temporary joint Ph.D. program. The selected doctoral candidates will study and conduct their research under Mongolian and Cambridge professors' joint supervision. Each doctoral candidate will spend a total of two full terms (5 months) of training at Cambridge University. Doctoral candidates are expected to submit their dissertation in English and defend their dissertations in front of the joint committee. Upon their successful completion of their degree, they will be recruited to the department as faculty members.

In addition, to support its research and teaching the department will build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance its technical capacity.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Mencher, Joan P.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 16, 2010
Project Title: 
Mencher, Dr. Joan, New York, NY - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Ammerman, Albert J.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Colgate U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 17, 2011
Project Title: 
Ammerman, Dr. Albert J., Colgate U., Hamilton, NY - To aid workshop on 'Island Archaeology and the Origins of Seafaring in the Eastern Mediterranean,' 2013, Reggio Calabria, Italy

'Island Archaeology and the Origins of Seafaring in the Eastern Mediterranean'
October 19-21, 2012, Reggio Calabria, Italy
Organizer: Dr. Albert J. Ammerman (Colgate U.)

The meeting constituted a new and rapidly emerging field of study in anthropology and archaeology, and brought together leading specialists to share recent findings, discuss new ideas, and move towards a new synthesis. Papers were presented on such topics as, 'Klimonas and its Contribution to the Study of Early Seafaring,' 'The Aegean Mesolithic: Material Culture Chronology, and Networks of Contact,' and 'Early Neolithic Settlements in Croatia and the Situation in the Adriatic Sea.' The workshop was truly international in character, including participants from the United States, France, Greece, Israel, Poland, Portugal, Turkey, and the United Kingdom, and accomplished its goal of gathering scholars from diverse perspectives and academic backgrounds. A highlight for participants was an afternoon of sailing on the Strait of Messina. A video of the experience can be found on the conference website, 'The First Argonauts,' http://seafaring.colgate.edu, along with images and information about research in this new field. Plans are in place to publish the proceedings in a double volume of the journal Eurasian Prehistory.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Minks, Amanda Gail

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 7, 2002
Project Title: 
Minks, Amanda, Columbia U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'Expressive Practices and Identity Formation among Miskitu Children,' supervised by Dr. Aaron A. Fox

AMANDA MINKS, while a student at Columbia University, New York, New York, received funding in June 2002 to aid research on 'Expressive Practices and Identity Formation among Miskitu Children,' supervised by Dr. Aaron A. Fox. In the past thirty years, Miskitu Indians have migrated in increasing numbers from mainland Nicaragua to Com Island, off the Caribbean coast. This migration has transformed the social and political landscape of the island, which, since the nineteenth century, has been populated primarily by English-speaking Creole people. Also transformed are the expressive and socializing practices of Miskitu islanders. The aim of the research supported by Wenner-Gren was to document the repertoires of Miskitu children's expressive practices across a range of contexts, providing a lens on shifting processes of socialization among peers and across generations. The term expressive practices encompasses a range of interrelated communicative activities (musical, linguistic, and kinetic) approached from the perspectives of style, performance, and poetics. The imagination is key not only in terms of children's play activities, but also in terms of developing social imaginaries that construct ties among people across time and space. Children were observed in formal socializing contexts, such as the school and the church, as well as the informal contexts of home and outdoor play spaces. Audio recordings of children's interaction were transcribed in collaboration with Miskitu consultants, and interviews were conducted with adults dealing with topics such as migration histories, gender roles, socialization practices, religion, and labor. This research attempts to make connections between the large-scale political and economic forces that are radically changing Com Island's social structure, and the small-scale interactions in which children are socialized - and socialize one another - in a multilingual, culturally diverse environment.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$11,000

Tarlow, Sarah Alexandra

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Leicester, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Tarlow, Dr. Sarah, U. of Leicester, Leicester, UK - To aid conference of 'Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA),' 2013, Leicester, in collaboration with Dr. Zoe Crossland

'46th Annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology'
January 9-12, 2013, U. Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
Organizers: Dr. Sarah Tarlow (U. Leicester) and Dr. Zoe Crossland (Columbia U.)

The conference theme-'Globalization, Immigration, Transformation'-emphasized global connections past and present, aiming to include scholars who would not ordinarily attend the meetings in order to explore these issues. Funding enabled six archaeologists from different parts of Africa to take advantage of the conference's location in the UK and to participate in the conference in different roles. A special session on 'History, Archaeology, and Memory Work in African Contexts' was also constituted to bring together scholars working in Africa to discuss current research on the topic and to advertise perspectives from African historical archaeology to other participants in the conference.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,500

Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Natal, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 12, 2005
Project Title: 
Leclerc-Madlala, Dr. Suzanne, U. of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa - To aid conference of ASA on 'Southern African Anthropology in the Context of Globalisation: The Way Forward,' 2005, Durban, in collaboration with Dr. Anand Singh

'Anthropology Southern Africa (ASA) 2005 Conference,' September 22-24, 2005, Durban, South Africa -- Organizers: Suzanne Leclerc-Madlala (University of KwaZulu-Natal) and Anand Singh. The annual conference of Anthropology Southern Africa was hosted by the Department of Anthropology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College in Durban. Under the theme 'Continuity, Change and Transformation: Anthropology in the 21st Century,' approximately 175 scholars attended the conference, which drew from a pool of academic contributions from university staff, students and practitioners in the field, where the latest trends in research and pedagogy in anthropology were discussed and debated. Three exciting keynote speakers with expertise in areas that are currently of critical importance in Southern Africa and globally -- transformations in tertiary education, terrorism, and HIV/AIDS -- set the tone for the entire conference, which included the delivery of 61 scholarly papers. The conference closed with an AGM, where new office bearers for ASA were chosen and plans for next year's joint ASA-Pan African Association of Anthropologists were finalized.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Salazar, Noel B.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Royal Anthropological Institute
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
January 28, 2015
Project Title: 
Salazar, Dr. Noel B., U. of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium - To prepare the complete correspondence and papers of the EASA Executive Committee for archival deposit with the Royal Anthropological Institute - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$17,500

Harris, John William Kendal

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rutgers U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Harris, Dr. John William Kendal, Rutgers U., New Brunswick, NJ; and Mbua, Dr. Emma N., National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya - To aid collaborative research on 'International Collaborative Paleoanthropological Research Project (lcpr), Ileret, Kenya'
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$29,750
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