National University of Mongolia

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National U. of Mongolia
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - Institutional Development Grant

The main aim of the project is to radically upgrade the institutional capacity of the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, National University of Mongolia, in order to make the department an institution that offers internationally sound anthropological research and training in Mongolia, and thus establish the field of socio-cultural anthropology in Mongolia firmly. The specific objectives of the project are to (1) develop a sound doctoral program that meets international standards, (2) train 4 new doctorates jointly with the Mongolian and Inner Asian Studies Unit (MIASU) and the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge, and recruit these doctorates as faculty members in the Department, (3) build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance technical capacity of the department.

Mongolian and Cambridge professors will set up a joint committee and design and develop a doctoral program. Four Mongolian and four Cambridge professors will take part in designing and developming of doctoral program and courses. They will mainly work through internet, however, Mongolian professors will visit the Cambridge University. Four Mongolian professors will work at MIASU in total of 7 months while developing ten doctoral courses.

In order to radically enhance the department's research and teaching capacity the Department will select four doctoral candidates for a temporary joint Ph.D. program. The selected doctoral candidates will study and conduct their research under Mongolian and Cambridge professors' joint supervision. Each doctoral candidate will spend a total of two full terms (5 months) of training at Cambridge University. Doctoral candidates are expected to submit their dissertation in English and defend their dissertations in front of the joint committee. Upon their successful completion of their degree, they will be recruited to the department as faculty members.

In addition, to support its research and teaching the department will build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance its technical capacity.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Barham, Lawrence S.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Liverpool, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
Barham, Dr. Lawrence, U. of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK -To aid 10th CHaGS conference on 'Resilience and Vulnerability in Hunter-Gatherer Research,' 2013, U. of Liverpool, in collaboration with Dr. Thomas Widlok

'10th Meeting of the Conference of Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHaGS)'
June 25-28, 2013, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Organizers: Lawrence Barham (U. Liverpool) and Thomas Widlok (Radboud U.)

Two hundred delegates from 25 countries took part in this long-awaited revival of the CHaGS tradition of interdisciplinary gatherings. The theme of 'Resilience and Vulnerability' provided the focus for discussing the status of contemporary hunter-gatherers and the future of hunter-gatherer research. Since the last meeting in 2002, the field of applied indigenous studies has continued to expand for which hunter-gatherer case studies remain invaluable. A new generation of evolutionary anthropologists has also emerged with innovative comparative approaches based on hunter-gatherer data. These differing approaches were brought together in the plenary sessions, which began each day. Highlights included lively debate on the role of warfare and violence in human evolution and the largest gathering of researchers on Dravidian-speaking hunter-gatherers. The conference concluded with a panel of young researchers representing a spectrum of interests, discussing their hopes for the future of hunter-gatherer studies. The legacy the Liverpool meeting has been the establishment of the International Society of Hunter-Gatherer Research (ISHGR) with CHaGS 11 to be held in Vienna in 2015.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Schieffelin, Bambi B.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Schieffelin, Dr. Bambi Bernhard, New York U., New York - To aid workshop on 'Analyzing Change: Cultural and Linguistic Models,' 2008, New York U., in collaboration with Dr. Joel Robbins

'Analyzing Change: Cultural and Linguistic Models'
April 9-12, 2008, New York University, New York, New York
Organizers: Bambi Schieffelin (New York University) and Joel Robbins (University of California - San Diego)

This workshop brought together cultural and linguistic anthropologists and sociolinguists to develop theoretical positions on the causes, types, and nature of linguistic and cultural change. In these fields, issues having to do with contact and transformation have become central. Yet for all the discussion of globalization, modernity, hybridity, syncretism, and the like, there is still little sustained theoretical work on the topic of change itself. Invited scholars -- all of whom focus in their empirical work on different kinds of change processes and dynamics (religious, political, economic, and linguistic) -- presented a range of theoretical explanations. Cultural anthropologists most often attended to the endurance of tradition or the nature of mixture. Linguistic anthropologists examined the role played by language(s) and their ideologies in social and political change, while sociolinguists focused on languages in contact and the role of variation in change. In synthesizing the strengths of these fields, participants came to appreciate what each could offer as contributions toward the development of integrated theories of cultural and linguistic change.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$14,880

Ember, Carol R.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Yale U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 31, 2009
Project Title: 
Ember, Dr. Carol R., Human Relations Area Files, Inc., New Haven, CT - To aid workshop on digital preservation of primary anthropological data, co-sponsored with the National Science Foundation, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Tribhuvan University

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Tribhuvan U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 2, 2009
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal - Institutional Development Grant

Through a collaboration with Cornell University, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tribhuvan University aims to bring improve the theoretical and methodological training of Ph.D students and upgrade the credentials of current faculty who do not hold a Ph.D. The IDG grant will be used to upgrade the current curriculum, provide modest support for research, intensify international exposure and exchange and build up the library and electronic resources. Currently in Nepal, the research agenda in anthropology is frequently determined by NGOs and development agencies where many of the students and faculty gain their experience. The IDG will allow more freedom for the department itself to determine its academic concerns. A primary aim is to significantly improve the theoretical and methodological capacity of the anthropology department as apposed to applied/development anthropology, thereby allowing the department to be competitive and contribute internationally.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Green, Edward C.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
January 19, 2016
Project Title: 
Green, Dr. Edward C., Washington, DC - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2016
Award Amount: 
$12,500

Yang, Jie

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Toronto, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
January 18, 2002
Project Title: 
Yang, Jie, Beijing Language & Culture U., Beijing, China - To aid training in anthropology at U. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, supervised by Dr. Hy Van Luong
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$12,500

Chiarelli, Brunetto A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Int'l Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 2, 2003
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Florence, Italy (through Executive Secretary, IUAES) - To aid 15th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, 2003, Florence
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Leopold, Robert S.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 13, 2010
Project Title: 
Leopold, Dr. Robert S., National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Marvin Harris - Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Nonaka, Angela Miyuki

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, Austin, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 7, 2010
Project Title: 
Nonaka, Dr. Angela M., U. of Texas, Austin, TX - To aid research and writing on ''It Takes a Village': Anthropological Analysis of Indigenous Sign Language Development and Decline in Thailand' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. ANGELA M. NONAKA, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship to aid research and writing on ''It Takes a Village:' Anthropological Analysis of Indigenous Sign Language Development and Decline in Thailand.' It Takes a Village is a 311-page manuscript that traces the life cycle of Ban Khor Sign Language. BKSL arose some 80 years ago in response to an unusually high incidence of hereditary deafness, and until recently was widely used in daily life by both hearing and deaf villagers, fostering participation and inclusion of the latter. This rare sociolinguistic ecology is undergoing dramatic changes, however, that threaten the continued vitality of BKSL, which is being supplanted by Thai Sign Language. Synthesizing more than a decade of continuous, holistic anthropological research, this study examines the causes and consequences of language emergence, maintenance, and shift. Ethnographically compelling on their own merits, the descriptive particulars of the Ban Khor case study have applied import for understanding the widespread endangerment of this rare sign language variety. This project also breaks new theoretical ground. By adopting a language socialization perspective that emphasizes interactional, use-based analysis of BKSL, this study counters key assumptions in formal linguistics about 'village' or 'indigenous' sign languages (and other lesser-known signing varieties), by demonstrating their full linguistic complexity and utility in situ, in the course of quotidian talk and interaction.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$40,000