Laderman, Michael

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 11, 2012
Project Title: 
Laderman, Michael, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Carol Laderman for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$3,950

Keeling, Simon R.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Lapsed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 24, 2005
Project Title: 
Keeling, Simon R., U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'The Poetry and Music of Conflict: Exploring Bamileke Funeral Performance,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine

SIMON R. KEELING, then a student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, received funding in May 2005 to aid research on 'The Poetry and Music of Conflict: Exploring Bamileke Funeral Perform-ance,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine. This research explored the meanings of music, poetry, and place among Bamiléké members of music and finance associations in Bangangté, Cameroon. The grantee attended the weekly meetings and rehearsals of some such groups, and arranged private music and language lessons. Attending and performing at mourning rites are among the most important func-tions of the groups. Music was recorded at rehearsals, lessons, and performances. Most song texts con-cerned: 1) responsibility to kin; 2) death, ritual, and the afterlife; or 3) the connections between ritual, kin-groups, and villages. The third theme includes traditions of naming which include both 'given' names and predictable names based on these connections. Decisions about which name to use when seem to be a significant poetic resource. Consultants' talk about villages and values demonstrated that the near-sacred spaces of village farms are crucial to how they understand power, beauty, and ethics. Working with micro-financial institutions showed that Bangangté is a place where the emotional intensity of poverty and gen-erosity is entangled with that of ritual and place. Making music together is neither tangential nor superfi-cial to such complexities; it develops, contains, deepens, permits and celebrates intimacy and affective in-tensity. All of this was going on in a context also shaped by a discourse of 'modernity' which cast 'village' practices in a negative light. Therefore, the Bamiléké of Bangangte are engaged in struggles for prestige which run through music and daily life.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Lott, Dylan Thomas

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
January 7, 2015
Project Title: 
Lott, Dylan Thomas, U. Illinois, Chicago, IL - To aid preparation of the Waud Kracke collection for archival deposit with archives at the U. Illinois at Chicago, Indiana U., and the Museu do Indio in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$14,997

Pritzker, Sonya Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Pritzker, Sonya Elizabeth, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'Language Socialization and Ideologies of Translation in U.S. Chinese Medical Education,' supervised by Dr. Elinor Ruth Ochs

SONYA PRITZKER, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, was awarded a grant in May 2007 to aid research on 'Language Socialization and Ideologies of Translation in U.S. Chinese Medical Education,' supervised by Dr. Elinor Ochs. This research looks at the role of language in the process by which English-speaking students in the U.S. learn to practice Chinese medicine, including acupuncture and herbal medicine. The research further places such learning in the broader socio-political and economic context of translation in Chinese medicine. Data consists of over ten months of classroom ethnography and person-centered interviews with students and teachers at a school of Chinese medicine in southern California, as well as interviews with translators and publishers of Chinese medical educational texts in the U.S. and China. Research findings demonstrate the daily enactment of a complex transnational linguistic, medical, and socio-cultural phenomenon impacting the way Chinese medicine is learned and practiced in an American context. Major themes emerging from the data point to the strong relationship between personal experiences of the self and linguistic choices in terms of translation and representation. The goal of the research is to build a further bridge between socio-cultural, psycho-cultural, and linguistic anthropology by showing the relationship between embodied personal experience and language in the highly contested, political economy of translation in U.S. Chinese medical education.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Universidad Nacional de Cordoba

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cordoba, National U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina - Institutional Development Grant

The Museum of Anthropology of Córdoba, Argentina, supported by the IDG of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, will develop a doctoral program to prepare professionals for research and academic education in Anthropological Sciences, with specialized training in the three classic sub-areas of research: Social Anthropology, Archaeology and Bioanthropology. The Museum will also benefit from collaborations with the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology of the University of Kansas, the Department of Anthropology of the University of Wyoming and Postgraduate Program in Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil the Museum.

The Doctoral program will focus on intensive theoretical and practical training to produce professionals who will be able to undertake independent research projects, exercise leadership of scientific research teams, communicate their research results, and teach at the university. It is hoped that through this program the students will also acquire various experiences in diverse academic contexts and form external relationship which will open possibilities for exchange and dialogue with other anthropologists, while generating their own future networks. It is hoped that this would impact positively on their education and in their personal and institutional performance.

The existence of a Postgraduate Program in Anthropological Sciences at Córdoba opens up the possibility of continuity in the training of graduate students and their integration into the teaching and research activities. This in turn will provide more opportunities for graduates of other neighboring Argentina provinces, where there is no such possibility of postgraduate training. This also will extend the possibilities of bringing the practice of anthropology to non academic realms, responding to a continuous growing demand in the region.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Fry, Douglas P.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Abo Akademi U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 19, 2010
Project Title: 
Fry, Dr. Douglas P., Abo Akademi U., Vasa, Finland - To aid workshop on 'Aggression and Peacemaking: Archaeology, Primatology, Nomadic Forager Studies and Behavioral Ecology,' 2010, Leiden U., Netherlands, in collaboration with Dr. Johan van der Dennen

Preliminary abstract: This interdisciplinary workshop will include perspectives from archaeology, primatology, nomadic forager studies, and human behavioral ecology. Findings from each of these disciplines pertain to the study of conflict management within an evolutionary framework. There are a number of disagreements and controversies about human aggression and conflict management within and between these disciplines. The approach in this workshop is to invite scholars with different perspectives and from different disciplines to explore areas of agreement and disagreement in a collegial manner. The time is ripe to bring together scholars with different theoretical orientations for constructive discussion and debate. The use of several methods will facilitate fruitful interaction: plenary talks followed by question-answer discussions, open discussions, small group discussion break-out groups, and moderated panel discussions on specific topics. Do the bodies of knowledge from these fields converge or diverge? What major conclusions about human aggression and conflict management can be drawn, at least provisionally, from an assessment of knowledge from these different disciplines? What do we know and what do we still need to know? How do evolutionary and behavior ecological perspectives contribute to understanding human conflict management and aggression? An edited book will be the final outcome.

Publication Credit:

Fry, Douglas P. (ed.) 2013. War, Peace, and Human Nature: The Convergence of Evolutionary and Cultural Views. Oxford University Press: Oxford and New York.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$14,980

Garrison Arensberg, Vivian E.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 2, 2011
Project Title: 
Garrison Arensberg, Dr. Vivian, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Conrad Arensberg for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Yang, Jie

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Toronto, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
January 18, 2002
Project Title: 
Yang, Jie, Beijing Language & Culture U., Beijing, China - To aid training in anthropology at U. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, supervised by Dr. Hy Van Luong
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$12,500

Krebs, Edgardo C

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
July 31, 2012
Project Title: 
Krebs, Edgardo, Bethesda, MD - To aid an analysis of the ethnographic films and collections of material culture by Paul Fejos in Madagascar, Nordisk Film Archives, Valby, Denmark
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$6,000

Garcia Sanchez, Inmaculada Maria

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 25, 2005
Project Title: 
Garcia Sanchez, Inmaculada, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'Multiple Worlds, Multiple Languages: The Lives of Moroccan Immigrant Children in Spain,' supervised by Dr. Elinor R. Ochs

INMACULADA GARCIA SANCHEZ, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, received funding in May 2006 to aid research on 'Mulitple Worlds, Multiple Languages: The Lives of Moroccan Immigrant Children in Spain,' supervised by Dr. Elinor R. Ochs. The last two decades, with its unprecedented proportions of Muslim immigration into both rural and urban European centers, have witnessed the emergence of strong diasporic communities that are pushing the boundaries of traditional notions of democracy, citizenship and identity. In this context, in which the new 'politics of belonging' are shaking the very foundations of societal structures and institutions, understanding the socio-cultural and linguistic lifeworlds of immigrant children has become one of the most challenging dilemmas for policy-makers and social-scientists alike. This ethnographic and linguistic study investigates the lifeworlds of Moroccan immigrant children in Spain in relation to the extent to which these children are able to juggle languages and social practices to meet different situational expectations and are able to develop a healthy sense of social and personal identity against the backdrop of rising levels of tension against immigrants from North Africa and the Muslim world. During 2005- 2006, fieldwork was conducted in a south-western Spanish town with 37% of immigrant population overwhelmingly of Moroccan origin. The grantee documented the ecology of the lives of six focal Moroccan immigrant children (8 to 11 years-old), three males and three females. The data collection was conducted in two phases: 1) a nine-month period of participant observation and video documentation of daily interactional practices; and 2) a six-month period of collection of children's narratives of personal experience. Through an integrated examination of children's narratives of personal experience and of language socialization practices related to intergenerational use of Arabic and Spanish linked to home, peer group, and educational institutions, this dissertation research attempted to illuminate: 1) the ways in which the complex relationship between Moroccan immigrant children and their multiple languages and cultures is intertwined with the multifaceted identities they have to negotiate in different arenas of social interaction; and 2) to what extent Moroccan immigrant children perceive cultural discontinuities across different settings, and how, in turn, they attempt to manage discrepant expectations and distinct socio-cultural world views in actual social interactions.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$25,000