Conant, Veronika A.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 27, 2013
Project Title: 
Conant, Veronika A., New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Francis P. Conant for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives and the Human Studies Film Archives - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Spiro, Jonathan

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 7, 2015
Project Title: 
Spiro, Jonathan, Castleton, VT - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Melford E. Spiro for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Garcia Sanchez, Inmaculada Maria

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 25, 2005
Project Title: 
Garcia Sanchez, Inmaculada, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'Multiple Worlds, Multiple Languages: The Lives of Moroccan Immigrant Children in Spain,' supervised by Dr. Elinor R. Ochs

INMACULADA GARCIA SANCHEZ, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, received funding in May 2006 to aid research on 'Mulitple Worlds, Multiple Languages: The Lives of Moroccan Immigrant Children in Spain,' supervised by Dr. Elinor R. Ochs. The last two decades, with its unprecedented proportions of Muslim immigration into both rural and urban European centers, have witnessed the emergence of strong diasporic communities that are pushing the boundaries of traditional notions of democracy, citizenship and identity. In this context, in which the new 'politics of belonging' are shaking the very foundations of societal structures and institutions, understanding the socio-cultural and linguistic lifeworlds of immigrant children has become one of the most challenging dilemmas for policy-makers and social-scientists alike. This ethnographic and linguistic study investigates the lifeworlds of Moroccan immigrant children in Spain in relation to the extent to which these children are able to juggle languages and social practices to meet different situational expectations and are able to develop a healthy sense of social and personal identity against the backdrop of rising levels of tension against immigrants from North Africa and the Muslim world. During 2005- 2006, fieldwork was conducted in a south-western Spanish town with 37% of immigrant population overwhelmingly of Moroccan origin. The grantee documented the ecology of the lives of six focal Moroccan immigrant children (8 to 11 years-old), three males and three females. The data collection was conducted in two phases: 1) a nine-month period of participant observation and video documentation of daily interactional practices; and 2) a six-month period of collection of children's narratives of personal experience. Through an integrated examination of children's narratives of personal experience and of language socialization practices related to intergenerational use of Arabic and Spanish linked to home, peer group, and educational institutions, this dissertation research attempted to illuminate: 1) the ways in which the complex relationship between Moroccan immigrant children and their multiple languages and cultures is intertwined with the multifaceted identities they have to negotiate in different arenas of social interaction; and 2) to what extent Moroccan immigrant children perceive cultural discontinuities across different settings, and how, in turn, they attempt to manage discrepant expectations and distinct socio-cultural world views in actual social interactions.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Wedel, Waldo M.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 19, 2010
Project Title: 
Wedel, Dr. Waldo M., Boulder, CO - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Waldo R. and Midred M. Wedel for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Homiak, John P.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 18, 2012
Project Title: 
Homiak, Dr. John P., National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the Joel M. Halpern collection - Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Krebs, Edgardo C

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
July 31, 2012
Project Title: 
Krebs, Edgardo, Bethesda, MD - To aid an analysis of the ethnographic films and collections of material culture by Paul Fejos in Madagascar, Nordisk Film Archives, Valby, Denmark
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$6,000

Mencher, Joan P.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 16, 2010
Project Title: 
Mencher, Dr. Joan, New York, NY - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Addis Ababa University

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Addis Ababa U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 22, 2012
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - Institutional Development Grant

The Department of Social Anthropology at Addis Ababa University launched a Ph.D program in 2010 on its own. In collaboration with anthropology departments in Europe, US, and Japan, the Department now intends to improve the theoretical and methodological training of Ph.D. students. The IDG grant will be used to intensify international exposure and exchange; improve the quality of anthropological training by bringing in experienced guest lectuerers and disseration co-advisors and examiners; upgrade the current curriculum in consultation with partner institutions; provide modest support for student field research; and build up the library and electronic resources. Ethiopia has a great need for highly trained anthropologists in academic and non-academic positions and the IDG will help the Department to train future generations to fill these positions. It will also help promote anthropology as an academic discipline in Ethiopia, where it is little known. By training local anthropologists who will do their fieldwork in their own country, we also wish to achieve a greater transparency in the dissemination of results among the researched communities and thus achieve a greater engagement.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Rosa, Jonathan Daniel

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rosa, Jonathan Daniel, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation’s Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

JONATHAN DANIEL ROSA, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation's Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. This grant supported twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork carried out between 2008-2009 within a newly created Chicago public high school whose student body was more than 90 percent Mexican and Puerto Rican. Observational, interview, and linguistic data include ongoing observations of more than 90 students, teachers, and administrators in the field site, as well as 40 in-depth interviews with students, teachers, and administrators. These data track: 1) the school's efforts toward transforming students; 2) students' shifting ideas about ethnoracial categories; and 3) the social sites in which distinctions between 'Mexicans' and 'Puerto Ricans' were undermined by emergent 'Latino' sensibilities. This research shows how processes of ethnoracial category making take shape as dialectic counterparts in relation to which language and literacy were understood and practiced in this field site. In particular, the linguistic findings reveal: 1) the profound redefinition of bilingualism as disability and 'languagelessness;' 2) students' strategies for escaping linguistic stigmatization; and 3) the semiotic operations that reduced students' expansive symbolic repertoires to criminality. This analysis of language and ethnoracial identity suggests the broader potential for people to look like a language and sound like a race across cultural contexts.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,960

Danda, Ajit Kumar

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Indian Anthropological Society
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 1, 2010
Project Title: 
Danda, Dr. Ajith, Indian Anthropological Society, Kolkata, India - To aid Golden Jubilee conference of IAS on 'Locating Alternative Voices of Anthropology,' 2011, Kolkata, in collaboration with Dr. Rajat Kanti Das

Preliminary abstract: The International Symposium proposed to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of the Indian Anthropological Society will have the following dual objectives :1) To eveluate the contributions of anthropologists : Euro-American, Afro-Asian, and Latin American in the light of dualism : Western vs. non-Western, that pervades the field of anthropology. 2) To evaluate the contributions of intellectuals, social thinkers, and literary figures toward anthropology in the Indian contexts. The Western view of anthropology, as a political and colonial discourse, has been countered by anthropologists from Asia, Africa, and Latin America in a way that may be understood as being based upon a rhetoric of equality reflected in the establishment of self-identity. It has discovered a voice to defend the rights of indigenes, tribes, and ethnic groups who were so long considered as products of a process of exclusion (Lindquist : 1966, Hulme : 1986,Todavor : 1987, Said : 1978, Mason : 1990, Thomas 1991, Danda : 1995, de-Certeau :1997). Though the American and European imagery of 'otherness' has been questened time and again, the Western discourses and practices are still regarded as guidelines for others to follow. Isn't it possible to look at anything but a product of the Western discourses and practices? This is the major issue to be debated in the proposed symposium.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000
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