Johnson, Amber L

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Truman State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 27, 2012
Project Title: 
Johnson, Amber, Kirksville, MO - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Lewis Binford for archival deposit with the Pickler Memorial Library, Truman State U., Kirksville, MO - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Maranda, Pierre

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Laval, Quebec, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 11, 2010
Project Title: 
Maranda, Dr. Pierre, Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada - To aid preparation of the unpublished research materials of Dr. Elli Kongas Maranda for archival deposit with the Musee de la Civilisation, Quebec, Canada
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$14,835

Rosa, Jonathan Daniel

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rosa, Jonathan Daniel, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation?s Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

JONATHAN DANIEL ROSA, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation's Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. This grant supported twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork carried out between 2008-2009 within a newly created Chicago public high school whose student body was more than 90 percent Mexican and Puerto Rican. Observational, interview, and linguistic data include ongoing observations of more than 90 students, teachers, and administrators in the field site, as well as 40 in-depth interviews with students, teachers, and administrators. These data track: 1) the school's efforts toward transforming students; 2) students' shifting ideas about ethnoracial categories; and 3) the social sites in which distinctions between 'Mexicans' and 'Puerto Ricans' were undermined by emergent 'Latino' sensibilities. This research shows how processes of ethnoracial category making take shape as dialectic counterparts in relation to which language and literacy were understood and practiced in this field site. In particular, the linguistic findings reveal: 1) the profound redefinition of bilingualism as disability and 'languagelessness;' 2) students' strategies for escaping linguistic stigmatization; and 3) the semiotic operations that reduced students' expansive symbolic repertoires to criminality. This analysis of language and ethnoracial identity suggests the broader potential for people to look like a language and sound like a race across cultural contexts.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,960

Bangali, Lamissa

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National School for Administration
Status: 
Lapsed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
June 18, 2002
Project Title: 
Bangali, Lamissa, ENAM, Burkina Faso - To cover air fare to Burkina Faso and cost of shipping books and personal belongings- P-FDG
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$5,000

Mireshghi, Elham

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Irvine, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2011
Project Title: 
U. of California, Irvine, CA, Mireshghi, Elham, PI - To aid research on 'Regulating the Kidney Market: An Ethnographic Investigation of the 'Iranian Model' for Paid Unrelated Kidney Donation,' supervised by Dr. Michael Montoya

ELHAM MIRESHGHI, then a student at University of California, Irvine, California, received funding in April 2011 to aid research on 'Regulating the Kidney Market: An Ethnographic Investigation of the 'Iranian Model' for Paid Unrelated Kidney Donation,' supervised by Dr. Michael Montoya. This research investigates the 'Iranian Model for Paid Non-related Kidney Donation,' the world's only religiously sanctioned and bureaucratically routinized policy for kidney sales. This project is about how despite broad moral uncertainty the policy has been developed and made to endure for over fifteen years. The results build on ethnographic research in hospitals and the Kidney Patient Foundation (KPF) that developed and implements the policy, as well as a diachronic analysis of the making of the policy, including interviews of kidney donors and patients, policy-makers, patient advocates, bureaucrats, urologists - and Shi'a jurists that have decreed permissive fatwas on organ sales. The first phase of this project consisted of extensive observation and interviewing at the KPF. By following the bureaucratic dynamics, the managerial tactics, and the movement (and stasis) of knowledge within the organization, it reveals the everyday processes that help kidney selling endure, despite the policy's conflict with the moral sensibilities of the many people involved. Furthermore, by ethnographically documenting encounters between kidney sellers, recipients, and staff, it reveals the ways in which each of these actors constructs an evolving fragmented ethics on kidney selling.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$10,595

Enfield, Nicholas James

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Max Planck Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Enfield, Dr. Nicholas James, Max Planck Institute, Nijmegen, The Netherlands - To aid workshop on 'Dynamics of Human Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia,' 2009, Siem Reap, Cambodia, in collaboration with Dr. Joyce Carol White

'Dynamics of Human Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia'
January 7-10, 2009, Siem Reap, Cambodia
Organizers: Nicholas Enfield (Max Planck Instittute, Nijmegen) and Joyce White (University of Pennsylvania Museum)

This four-field meeting brought together an international group of linguists, social/cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, and physical/biological anthropologists, to address the following question: What is the nature of human diversity in mainland Southeast Asia, and how did it come to be this way? The focus of discussions was restricted spatially to
mainland Southeast Asia (centrally, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and the Malay Peninsula) and temporally to the Holocene (the last 11,000 years). Drawing upon exciting new developments in all sub-fields of anthropology in this area, scholars from different disciplines came together to update one another on the states of their respective arts, as well
as to identify new syntheses and new agendas for interdisciplinary research. Issues of homeland of ethnolinguistic groups, and of timing of migrations (especially of the Asian groups of peninsular Malaysia and Thailand, and more generally the Austroasiatic language family), were illuminated by considering different kinds of evidence from the most recent
research in historical linguistics, archaeology, and especially the latest results from bioarchaeology and genetics. None of the biggest questions were definitively solved, but the meeting succeeded in bringing all participants further along in the search for solutions, as well as forging some new scholarly relationships with the potential for future interdisciplinary collaborations.

Publication credit:

Enfield, N.J. 2011. Linguistic Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia. In Dynamics of Human Diversity: The Case of Mainland Southeast Asia. Pacific Linguistics. School of Culture, History and Language. College of Asia and the Pacific. The Australian National University: Canberra.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Green, Elizabeth Mara

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2009
Project Title: 
Green, Elizabeth Mara, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'Everyday Signs: Deaf Sociality and Communicative Practices in Rural Nepal,' supervised by Dr. William F. Hanks

ELIZABETH MARA GREEN, then a student at the University of California, Berkeley, California, was awarded funding in May 2009, to aid research on 'Everyday Signs: Deaf Sociality and Communicative Practices in Rural Nepal,' supervised by Dr. William F. Hanks. An estimated 5,000-15,000 deaf people in Nepal are Nepali Sign Language (NSL) users and participants in an urban-centered, national deaf community. In contrast, the majority of deaf Nepalis -- some 190,000 according to one frequently quoted figure -- never learn, or even encounter, NSL. Without access to a shared language, these deaf people, along with their hearing interlocutors, develop localized gestural systems to communicate. The researcher conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Kathmandu, the capital, and Maunabudhuk, a village in the east, with local signers. The findings suggest that local sign is both like and unlike communication that occurs when using a standard language; while both rely on conventions, the former has a much smaller and less stable repertoire, such that it is characterized not only by successes but also by frequent misunderstandings and a very tightly-bound relationship to social and interactional context. The dissertation will explore more fully how deaf local signers and their hearing family members, neighbors, and friends draw on shared personal experiences, tacit social knowledge, and the material landscape to produce meaningful signs and meaningful lives.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$4,069

Kaplan, Flora S.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
August 25, 2014
Project Title: 
Kaplan, Dr. Flora E., New York, NY - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Martineau, Katherine Boulden

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Martineau, Katherine Boulden, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Valuing Language in a Free Press: Language Ideologies, Intellectual Properties, and Liberalism in Indian Newspapers,' supervised by Dr. Edward Webb Keane

KATHERINE BOULDEN MARTINEAU, then a student at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, was awarded a grant in May 2007, to aid research on 'Valuing Language in a Free Press: Language Ideologies, Intellectual Properties, and Liberalism in Indian Newspapers,' supervised by Dr. Edward Webb Keane. With the support of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, this research explored relationships between understandings of language and economic value in print news media production in eastern-central India since economic liberalization. Through participant-observation, interviews, and media analysis, the grantee looked at production practices across English and Oriya language media production sites. In thirteen months of research in the Indian city of Bhubaneswar, contrary to what was expected, the grantee found very little variation in ways of producing and talking about producing news texts across Indian-language and English-language news media production sites, despite strong local sentiments of Oriya's distinctive capacities. It was discovered that both English and Oriya news production rely on the reproduction and circulation of generic textual components, which is reflected in the distribution of much writing labor across several individuals. The resulting dissertation explores the economic strategies, professional ideals, legal codes, political scandals, and social worlds that have wrought news production practices in contemporary Bhubaneswar, and how, like the news stories themselves, these linguistic practices have become a means for reckoning Bhubaneswar's relationship with the rest of the world.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$21,220

Callan, Hilary Margaret West

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Royal Anthropological Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 16, 2004
Project Title: 
Royal Anthropological Institute, London, England - To aid preparation and organization of the RAI's historical materials for archival access
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