Reuter, Thomas Anton

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Grant Year
2008

'Opportunities and Challenges for International Cooperation and Participation in Anthropology: Toward an Agenda for World Anthropology'
July 27-31, 2009, Kunming, China
Organizers: Thomas A. Reuter (Monash University) and Gustavo Ribeiro (Universidade de Brasilia)

Quincey, Jennifer Anne

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Grant Year
2006

JENNIFER QUINCEY, a student at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, received funding in April 2006 to support research on 'Welsh Language Revitalization: Normative Signals and Adult Linguistic Socialization', supervised by Dr. John Bowen. A surge in interest in Welsh language education has followed the recent, dramatic reversal in the status of the Welsh language. This research centers on a contested, emergent variety of Welsh unique to Welsh for Adults (WfA) classrooms.

Pritzker, Sonya Elizabeth

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Grant Year
2007

SONYA PRITZKER, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, was awarded a grant in May 2007 to aid research on 'Language Socialization and Ideologies of Translation in U.S. Chinese Medical Education,' supervised by Dr. Elinor Ochs. This research looks at the role of language in the process by which English-speaking students in the U.S. learn to practice Chinese medicine, including acupuncture and herbal medicine. The research further places such learning in the broader socio-political and economic context of translation in Chinese medicine.

Nonaka, Angela Miyuki

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Grant Year
2010

DR. ANGELA M. NONAKA, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship to aid research and writing on ''It Takes a Village:' Anthropological Analysis of Indigenous Sign Language Development and Decline in Thailand.' It Takes a Village is a 311-page manuscript that traces the life cycle of Ban Khor Sign Language. BKSL arose some 80 years ago in response to an unusually high incidence of hereditary deafness, and until recently was widely used in daily life by both hearing and deaf villagers, fostering participation and inclusion of the latter.