Hsiao, Chi-hua

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 12, 2011
Project Title: 
Hsiao, Chi-hua, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'Subtitle Groups as Cultural Translators in China,' supervised by Dr. Elinor Ochs

CHI-HUA HSIAO, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, received funding in October 2011 to aid research on 'Subtitle Groups as Cultural Translators in China,' supervised by Dr. Elinor Ochs. This dissertation project examines the phenomenon of cultural translation in the context of an underground network of Internet-based amateur translators in China. Informal volunteer subtitle groups emerged in the mid-1990s and began catering to the younger generation's thirst for U.S. media popular culture. These translators add Chinese-language subtitles to programs, post the shows online for free downloads, and provide a network for online interactions. The subtitling activity reflects the younger Chinese generation's articulation of new morality discourses and their challenges to the state-party monopoly of information. The younger generation attempts to establish its own moral justifications as a form of resistance to the regime surveillance and in adherence to individual life-enriching practices. This study explores how Chinese volunteer subtitlers construct representations of U.S. television programs and films and how these representations relate to the globalization of sociocultural ideologies. It offers insights into how the collaborative volunteer efforts of subtitle groups acting as cultural brokers represent a new paradigm of morality among Chinese youth and young adults of the virtual community and how such initiatives influence the younger generation's perceptions of foreign popular culture as part of the larger globalized flow of information.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$4,160

Kulick, Don

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Kulick, Dr. Don, New York U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'The Dying Language that Didn't Die: 20 Years Later in Gapun, PNG'

DR. DON KULICK, New York University, New York, New York, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'The Dying Language that Didn't Die: 20 Years Later in Gapun, PNG'. Research followed up original research conducted in the late 1980s studying a small Papua New Guinean village called Gapun and of the isolate vernacular language, Taiap, that is spoken only there. Eight months of fieldwork in 2009 revealed that Taiap is still spoken in Gapun, but it is dying. The total population of fluent and semi-fluent speakers is about 60. Villagers in their early 20s and younger continue to understand the language, and can even produce it when asked to by a visiting anthropologist. But they do not use Taiap in any context. Fieldwork has resulted in enough material to analyze the dynamics of the language death in the village, and to write a dictionary and grammar of Taiap. Research also focused on how the young people who can speak some Taiap produce versions of the vernacular that are regularized, simplified, and etiolated. This material will allow analysis that charts the grammatical disintegration of a Papuan language. A further study of how women who were children in the 1980s socialize their children to use language will be able to address the question of whether or not language socialization patterns endure across generations.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Preloran, Jorge R.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 23, 2007
Project Title: 
Preloran, Prof. Jorge, U. of California, Los Angeles - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the Human Studies Film Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Strand, Thea Randina

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Strand, Thea Randina, U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid 'Varieties in Dialogue: A Historical and Ethnographic Study of Dialect Use and Shift in Rural Norway,' supervised by Dr. Jane H. Hill

THEA R. STRAND, then a student at University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Varieties in Dialogue: A Historical and Ethnographic Study of Dialect Use and Shift in Rural Norway,' supervised by Dr. Jane H. Hill. This research investigates the relationships between dialect use, language ideologies, and rural identities in the rural Norwegian valley of Valdres, as well as the direction of contemporary local dialect shift relative to the competing written norms of Bokmål and Nynorsk. During ethnographic fieldwork in 2007-2008, recordings of dialect use were collected from metalinguistic interviews, casual conversations, theater performances, and national media appearances by dialect speakers. Based on these recordings, as well as participant observation, this study combines an analysis of dominant discourses and ideologies of language with the close linguistic analysis of accent and grammatical forms associated with the Valdres dialect. Additionally, a long-term historical perspective is incorporated in order to explore the ways in which the 150-year history of language planning and struggle in Norway has contributed to the development of the contemporary linguistic situation. While previous research in Valdres has indicated long-term change in the direction of normative, regional urban speech, a central finding of this study is that dialect change today appears to be multi-directional -- both toward standard, urban Norwegian, and, simultaneously, toward new, markedly rural forms. The latter kind of change is clearly supported by local ideologies that have recently revalued rural culture, identity, and language.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$6,335

Chand, Vineeta

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Davis, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Chand, Vineeta, U. of California, Davis, CA - To aid research on 'Indian English Ownership, Status and Variation,' supervised by Dr. Janet Shibamoto Smith

VINEETA CHAND, then a student at University of California, Davis, California, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'Indian English Ownership, Status and Variation,' supervised by Dr. Janet Shibamoto Smith. This research addressed the Indian English (IE) socio-cultural linguistic setting, examining the relationship between structural variation, identity, attitudes and personal history for New Delhi English bilinguals. Informed by the fields of sociolinguistics, anthropology, and South Asian studies, the research uses quantitative and qualitative analytic linguistic methodologies, in conjunction with close ethnographic observation, to address socio-cultural questions. Modern alternative multilingual settings raise important theoretical questions about applying variationist methods in new contexts, and interrelationships between language change, shifts in linguistic ideologies, and sociolinguistic identity. Drawing on 50-plus hours of informal conversations and ethnographic fieldwork, significant links were uncovered between linguistic practices, ideologies, and evolving historical backdrops, wherein gender, age, ethno-linguistic background, and domestic mobility are each foundational elements of individual urban identity, and collectively are significant for understanding systematic IE language practices. These findings challenge the assumption that oft-considered 'basic' social factors, widely used in variationist studies, are adequate to account for alternative, third-world settings, underscoring the importance of ethnographic and qualitative data for interpreting language practices. This project also examined processes and results of globalization and localization, demonstrating that IE's development as a distinct English dialect is intertwined with the emergence of a locally valuable, urban Indian identity.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$11,224

Wintle, Pamela

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 21, 2007
Project Title: 
Wintle, Dr. Pamela, Human Studies Film Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Dr. John Marshall -- Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Gal, Susan

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 6, 2001
Project Title: 
Gal, Dr. Susan, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid workshop on linguistic anthropology research, 2001, Chicago, in collaboration with Dr. Bruce Mannheim

'Linguistic Anthropology Research Consortium,' 2001-2003, Chicago, Illinois -- Organizers: Susan Gal (University of Chicago) and Bruce Manheim (University of Michigan). The Linguistic Anthropology Research Consortium was organized to promote intellectual synergy among linguistic anthropologists in the Great Lakes region, enhance the research of its members, and jointly develop areas of theoretical advance within linguistic anthropology. The group met nine times in three years. Each meeting was devoted to the work in progress of two members, followed by broader theoretical debate. Papers were distributed ahead of time. A sense of joint effort emerged, along with a convergence of theoretical frameworks for investigating the ways in which language and text are commodified, how discursive practices circulate in global flows, and how linguistic practices are social differentiated. In addition to the single-authored publications developed through this series of meetings, a 'Midwest nexus' of linguistic anthropology emerged. Consortium members have begun to seek further funding to institutionalize their collaboration in the form of yearly conferences and websites.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Scie

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Other
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 19, 2010
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Manchester, UK (through IUAES org. John Gledhill) - To aid '17th Congress of the IUAES: Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds,' 2013, Manchester

'Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds: The 17th Congress of the International Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences'
August 5-10, 2013, Manchester University, Manchester, United Kingdom
Organizer: Dr. John Gledhill (Manchester U.)

This truly global congress brought together 1260 anthropologists from sixty-five countries to present 1283 papers in 211 parallel session panels, which successfully promoted dialogue between scholars from different countries and across sub-field boundaries. This networking will be consolidated in the future through the system of IUAES commissions that was reinvigorated at the event. The use of thematic tracks for the parallel sessions worked well in producing innovative and focused panels, the Museum Anthropology track involved international conversations that included countries such as China, and the Visual Anthropology program included several imaginative complements to the normal film-screenings and panel presentations. Wenner-Gren's central role in the promotion of world anthropology and the IUAES was entertainingly presented in Leslie Aiello's inaugural keynote address. Lourdes Arizpe and Howard Morphy gave additional keynotes sponsored by ASA and RAI respectively. Three plenaries consisted of debates between four key speakers, with additional audience participation, another well-received innovation that sharpened the presentation of issues and ensured global diversity amongst the plenary speakers. The final plenary was a panel discussion on World Anthropologies. This and two other panels were sponsored by WCAA. Edited videos of the plenary sessions are now available on YouTube, and various print publications are also in preparation.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Laderman, Michael

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 11, 2012
Project Title: 
Laderman, Michael, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Carol Laderman for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$3,950

Price, David H.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 24, 2009
Project Title: 
Price, Dr. David H., St. Martin's U., Lacey, WA - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Marvin Harris for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$15,000