Kealiinohomoku, Joann W.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
February 11, 2013
Project Title: 
Kealiinohomoku, Joann W., Flagstaff, AZ - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the Cross-Cultural Dance Resources Collection at Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$14,667

Martineau, Katherine Boulden

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Martineau, Katherine Boulden, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Valuing Language in a Free Press: Language Ideologies, Intellectual Properties, and Liberalism in Indian Newspapers,' supervised by Dr. Edward Webb Keane

KATHERINE BOULDEN MARTINEAU, then a student at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, was awarded a grant in May 2007, to aid research on 'Valuing Language in a Free Press: Language Ideologies, Intellectual Properties, and Liberalism in Indian Newspapers,' supervised by Dr. Edward Webb Keane. With the support of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, this research explored relationships between understandings of language and economic value in print news media production in eastern-central India since economic liberalization. Through participant-observation, interviews, and media analysis, the grantee looked at production practices across English and Oriya language media production sites. In thirteen months of research in the Indian city of Bhubaneswar, contrary to what was expected, the grantee found very little variation in ways of producing and talking about producing news texts across Indian-language and English-language news media production sites, despite strong local sentiments of Oriya's distinctive capacities. It was discovered that both English and Oriya news production rely on the reproduction and circulation of generic textual components, which is reflected in the distribution of much writing labor across several individuals. The resulting dissertation explores the economic strategies, professional ideals, legal codes, political scandals, and social worlds that have wrought news production practices in contemporary Bhubaneswar, and how, like the news stories themselves, these linguistic practices have become a means for reckoning Bhubaneswar's relationship with the rest of the world.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$21,220

Rodriguez, Juan Luis

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Southern Illinois U., Carbondale
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rodriguez, Juan Luis, Southern Illinois U., Carbondale, IL - To aid research on 'Rhetorical Strategies and Gift Circulation in the Politics of The Orinoco Delta, Venezuela,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan David Hill

JUAN LUIS RODRIGUEZ, then a student at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Rhetorical Strategies and Gift Circulation in the Politics of the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan D. Hill. This study analyses political discursive strategies and gift circulation in the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela. This is a semiotic and discourse-centered study on how the Warao indigenous population interacts with political representatives from the Venezuelan government. This study is based on a yearlong fieldwork focusing on political speeches and observing how political gifts are circulated. Research focused on public political events in which politicians, governmental representatives, and communal council's members perform public political discourses. During this year, the grantee followed the constitutional referendum of December 2007 and the organization of the 2008 regional election in the Orinoco Delta, as well as the development of the Morichito communal council in the Lower Delta. This helped in evaluating how gift circulation and political discourse intersect as semiotic strategies. The purpose of this research is to further advance the discourse-centered approaches to cultures developed in South America by addressing the ways in which discursive sign vehicles interact with other semiotic forms, especially political gifts. This type of analysis is central to understand recent political processes occurring among the Warao, as well as the general political climate of Venezuela since 1998 (the rising of President Hugo Chavez Frias).

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$23,900

Blommaert, Jan

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Ghent U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 5, 2004
Project Title: 
Blommaert, Dr. Jan. Ghent U., Ghent, Belgium - To aid oral-history interviews on modern ethnography with Dr. Dell Hymes.
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$2,803

Sutton, Constance R.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 9, 2001
Project Title: 
Sutton, Dr. Constance, New York U., New York, NY - To aid oral-history interviews with select members of the International Women's Anthropology Conference and New York Women's Anthropology Conference
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$1,273

Fee, Sarah E.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
July 16, 2008
Project Title: 
Fee, Dr. Sarah, Washington, DC - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Wilton S. Dillon for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$10,740

Xu, Jian

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Sun Yat-sen U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 29, 2004
Project Title: 
Xu, Dr. Jian, Sun Yat-sen University, Guanzhou, P.R. China - To aid oral-history interviews for 'Public and Private Reflection of Anthropology in China: the First Centenary'
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$3,500

Hanna, Judith L.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Library Congress
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 14, 2008
Project Title: 
Hanna, Dr. Judith L, Bethesda, MD - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$5,076

Keeling, Simon R.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Lapsed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 24, 2005
Project Title: 
Keeling, Simon R., U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'The Poetry and Music of Conflict: Exploring Bamileke Funeral Performance,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine

SIMON R. KEELING, then a student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, received funding in May 2005 to aid research on 'The Poetry and Music of Conflict: Exploring Bamileke Funeral Perform-ance,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine. This research explored the meanings of music, poetry, and place among Bamiléké members of music and finance associations in Bangangté, Cameroon. The grantee attended the weekly meetings and rehearsals of some such groups, and arranged private music and language lessons. Attending and performing at mourning rites are among the most important func-tions of the groups. Music was recorded at rehearsals, lessons, and performances. Most song texts con-cerned: 1) responsibility to kin; 2) death, ritual, and the afterlife; or 3) the connections between ritual, kin-groups, and villages. The third theme includes traditions of naming which include both 'given' names and predictable names based on these connections. Decisions about which name to use when seem to be a significant poetic resource. Consultants' talk about villages and values demonstrated that the near-sacred spaces of village farms are crucial to how they understand power, beauty, and ethics. Working with micro-financial institutions showed that Bangangté is a place where the emotional intensity of poverty and gen-erosity is entangled with that of ritual and place. Making music together is neither tangential nor superfi-cial to such complexities; it develops, contains, deepens, permits and celebrates intimacy and affective in-tensity. All of this was going on in a context also shaped by a discourse of 'modernity' which cast 'village' practices in a negative light. Therefore, the Bamiléké of Bangangte are engaged in struggles for prestige which run through music and daily life.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$25,000

McComsey, Melanie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Diego, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2011
Project Title: 
McComsey, Melanie, U. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA - To aid research on 'Bilingual Spaces: Socialization to Spatialized Practice in Spanish and Juchitán Zapotec,' supervised by Dr. John B. Haviland

MELANIE McCOMSEY, then a student at University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, was awarded funding in April 2011 to aid research on 'Bilingual Spaces: Socialization to Spatialized Practice in Spanish and Juchitán Zapotec,' supervised by Dr. John B. Haviland. This project offers a fresh perspective on the classic problem of linguistic relativity associated with Humboldt, Sapir, and Whorf. It draws on ethnographic and semi-experimental linguistic data collected over two years of fieldwork with bilingual speakers of Spanish and Juchitan Zapotec, an Otomanguean language spoken in Juchitan, Oaxaca, Mexico. Because the languages differ in their spatial grammar, and because the speakers differ in their bilingual proficiency in the two languages, the researcher was able to investigate whether different cognitive styles are related to specific linguistic codes. Research found that some changes in spatial cognitive style are happening independently of changes in the grammars of Spanish and Zapotec. This suggests that ways of thinking about space may not be coupled to individual linguistic codes, but can vary as part of a local system of practice and communication. It was also found that embodied interactions with the rapidly modernizing built environment in Juchitan affect how children learn particular styles of spatial problem solving. This project contributes to the fields of linguistic relativity and language contact, showing how multiple worldviews are created and lived through practice within a single speech community.

Grant Year: 
2011