Greenberg, James B.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 8, 2003
Project Title: 
Greenberg, Dr. James B., U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology Oral History Project
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$9,381

Kattan, Shlomy

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Kattan, Shlomy, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid 'Language Socialization and Language Ideologies among Israeli Emissaries: A Global Ethnography of Transnationalism,' supervised by Dr. Sahara Patricia Baquedano-Lopez

SHLOMY KATTAN, then a student at University of California, Berkeley, California, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Language Socialization and Language ideologies among Israeli Emissaries: A Global Ethnography of Transnationalism,' supervised by Dr. Sahara Patricia Baquedano-Lopez. This multi-sited ethnography examines language socialization, linguistic ideologies, and identity practices amongst families of Israeli emissaries and their young children, following their transition from Israel, through their residence in New York, and until their return to Israel after two years. During the first funded year of research, observations, interviews, and audio and video recording have been carried out in both countries at home and in school. In-home observations capture the methods used to socialize children to being bilingual, record family conversations about Israel and New York, and document changes in participants' language use. In-school observations document changes ininteractional practices between the focal children, their teachers, and peers. Observations document how focal children enter into and form social groups, how they negotiate their position as language learners and as non-locals, and how they utilize their changing linguistic skills. The data provide empirical support that the transition and socialization of the children are negotiated across sites, and illustrate how such negotiations take place across the sites. Socialization practices are not positivistic or objective, but rather derive rom participants' changing ideologies vis-à-vis children's abilities in English and Hebrew, as well as their perceptions of the children's fluctuating needs in those languages.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$23,343

McShane, Patrice McCrann

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2010
Project Title: 
McShane, Patrice McCrann, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Ethnic Insult as Conflict Prevention in Burkina Faso,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine

Preliminary abstract: In this dissertation project, I will explore cultural beliefs about dakire, the exchange of ethnic insults in Burkina Faso. Dakire is highly theorized by Burkinabè people, who attribute many societal boons to it: the facilitation of candor in a deferential society; the minimization of inter-ethnic power differential; the catharsis of ethnic tension. Many Burkinabè people believe that dakire is key to the smooth functioning of society, and that it serves to prevent violence between ethnic groups. For these reasons, dakire is a point of local pride and salience. I suggest that ethnic jokers ideologically and semiotically reify concepts of 'ethnicity' and 'nation,' through interactional, linguistic practice. I will examine how different political movements have influenced modern beliefs about dakire. Although dakire has existed in Burkina since pre-colonial times, I hypothesize that its heightened salience is a new phenomenon. Dakire, in its modern conception, serves to unite ethnic groups into a network delineated by national boundaries, making it an attractive nation-building tool for the Burkinabè state. I also explore how dakire is motivated by an iconic relationship to kinship-based joking. This metaphorical extension of familial behavioral norms onto inter-ethnic behavioral norms reinforces the 'naturalness' of modern ethnic categories and inter-ethnic affiliation.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$17,570

Schieffelin, Bambi B.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Schieffelin, Dr. Bambi Bernhard, New York U., New York - To aid workshop on 'Analyzing Change: Cultural and Linguistic Models,' 2008, New York U., in collaboration with Dr. Joel Robbins

'Analyzing Change: Cultural and Linguistic Models'
April 9-12, 2008, New York University, New York, New York
Organizers: Bambi Schieffelin (New York University) and Joel Robbins (University of California - San Diego)

This workshop brought together cultural and linguistic anthropologists and sociolinguists to develop theoretical positions on the causes, types, and nature of linguistic and cultural change. In these fields, issues having to do with contact and transformation have become central. Yet for all the discussion of globalization, modernity, hybridity, syncretism, and the like, there is still little sustained theoretical work on the topic of change itself. Invited scholars -- all of whom focus in their empirical work on different kinds of change processes and dynamics (religious, political, economic, and linguistic) -- presented a range of theoretical explanations. Cultural anthropologists most often attended to the endurance of tradition or the nature of mixture. Linguistic anthropologists examined the role played by language(s) and their ideologies in social and political change, while sociolinguists focused on languages in contact and the role of variation in change. In synthesizing the strengths of these fields, participants came to appreciate what each could offer as contributions toward the development of integrated theories of cultural and linguistic change.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$14,880

Berlin, Overton Brent

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 22, 2011
Project Title: 
Berlin, Dr. Overton Brent, U. of Georgia, Athens, GA - To aid preparation of the personal research collections of Brent and Elois Ann Berlin for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Universite d'Etat d'Haiti

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Universite d'Etat d'Haiti
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 26, 2013
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Universite d'Etat d' Haiti, Port-Au-Prince, Haiti - Institutional Development Grant

Through primary partnerships with the University of Kansas (KU) and Teachers College, Columbia University (TC), the State University of Haiti (UEH) will implement an ethos of productivity to establish a fully functioning doctoral program that will facilitate student and faculty training as well as research. This will be accomplished by a) increasing the number of Ph.D.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Engelke, Christopher Robert

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 14, 2010
Project Title: 
Engelke, Christopher Robert, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'The Design and Use of Augmentative Alternative Communications Technologies,' supervised by Dr. Paul V. Kroskrity

CHRISTOPHER ENGELKE, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, received funding in October 2010 to aid research on 'The Design and Use of Augmentative: Alternative Communications Technologies,' supervised by Dr. Paul V. Kroskrity. Current figures suggest that over 2 million Americans have a disability that compromises their speech intelligibility, requiring them to use a special form of assistive technology called augmentative alternative communications (AAC) devices in order to literally and figuratively have 'a voice.' This study examines the phenomena of embodiment, empathy, and intersubjectivity that manifest around the design and use of these augmentative communications devices by examining the ways in which individuals' embodied and ideological familiarities with the world are revealed in their engagements with these specialized communications technologies. By investigating the ways that able-bodied designers approach the task of developing AAC technologies, this study uncovers relationships between one's physical abilities, normative prescriptions for action, and the forms and limits of understanding others whose bodily abilities may be radically different from one's own. Moreover, by examining the ways that AAC users take up the features of their devices in everyday interactions, this study reveals the unique ways in which this technology is incorporated into bodily understandings of the 'self' and its location in the world.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$22,045

Hall, Jennifer Lee

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Hall, Jennifer Lee, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Building Bridges: Language Ideology and Passerelle Literacy Education in Morocco,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine

JENNIFER L. HALL, then a student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'Building Bridges: Language Ideology and Passerelle Literacy Education in Morocco,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine. This dissertation research looks at mother tongue adult literacy education in Morocco through a case study of a new methodology called 'passerelle.' The grantee tested the hypothesis that passerelle -- by promoting Standard Arabic script as an ideologically neutral instrument for representing mother tongue languages -- presents an ideological conflict for learners and educators who may hold differing ideas as to the appropriateness of portraying traditionally oral languages in written form using Arabic script. Twelve months of comparative research was conducted on the ideologies of learners and educators in passerelle classrooms, in both urban and rural settings. The grantee observed that passerelle literacy educators tended to avoid utilizing mother tongue literacy activities in the classroom and instead relied on normative methods of Standard Arabic literacy teaching. They restricted the use of mother tongues languages in the classroom to oral activities and the use of Standard Arabic to writing activities, thus indicating that passerelle methodology did indeed present an ideological conflict. In contrast, most adult literacy learners did not express a similar ideological conflict and embraced opportunities to write in dialectical Arabic. This is partially due to the fact that many did not hold any preconceived notions about distinctions between oral and written Arabic.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,663

Kealiinohomoku, Joann W.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
February 11, 2013