Kramer, Elise Ann

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2010
Project Title: 
Kramer, Elise Ann, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Mutual Minorityhood: The Rhetoric of Victimhood in the American Free Speech/Political Correctness Debate,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

ELISE A. KRAMER, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, was awarded funding in May 2010 to aid research on 'Mutual Minorityhood: The Rhetoric of Victimhood in the American Free Speech/Political Correctness Debate,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. It is a curious feature of contemporary American political debates that they tend to shade into arguments about censorship and freedom of speech. Moreover, these arguments often fit into a well-trod metapragmatic cycle: 'You're censoring me!' 'No, I'm not, and by saying I'm censoring you, you're censoring me.' Freedom of speech is simultaneously everywhere and nowhere. The dissertation attempts to make sense of this apparent paradox by arguing that seemingly specific and localized arguments about censorship and silencing are actually one of the central organizing tools for a wide range of folk ideologies about power, language, representation, identity, and the shape of the social landscape. The project is based on nine months of ethnographic fieldwork at a state American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) affiliate in the Bible Belt, supplemented by interviews with high-level staff at various political nonprofits in Washington, DC. Through the analysis of the language that these activists used in political and apolitical interactions, the dissertation unpacks the extraordinarily complex notion of 'censorship' in the modern multicultural state and demonstrates that its stakes are not only far-reaching but central to American political life.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$18,820

National University of Mongolia

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National U. of Mongolia
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - Institutional Development Grant

The main aim of the project is to radically upgrade the institutional capacity of the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, National University of Mongolia, in order to make the department an institution that offers internationally sound anthropological research and training in Mongolia, and thus establish the field of socio-cultural anthropology in Mongolia firmly. The specific objectives of the project are to (1) develop a sound doctoral program that meets international standards, (2) train 4 new doctorates jointly with the Mongolian and Inner Asian Studies Unit (MIASU) and the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge, and recruit these doctorates as faculty members in the Department, (3) build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance technical capacity of the department.

Mongolian and Cambridge professors will set up a joint committee and design and develop a doctoral program. Four Mongolian and four Cambridge professors will take part in designing and developming of doctoral program and courses. They will mainly work through internet, however, Mongolian professors will visit the Cambridge University. Four Mongolian professors will work at MIASU in total of 7 months while developing ten doctoral courses.

In order to radically enhance the department's research and teaching capacity the Department will select four doctoral candidates for a temporary joint Ph.D. program. The selected doctoral candidates will study and conduct their research under Mongolian and Cambridge professors' joint supervision. Each doctoral candidate will spend a total of two full terms (5 months) of training at Cambridge University. Doctoral candidates are expected to submit their dissertation in English and defend their dissertations in front of the joint committee. Upon their successful completion of their degree, they will be recruited to the department as faculty members.

In addition, to support its research and teaching the department will build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance its technical capacity.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Smalley, Carol J.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 2, 2005
Project Title: 
Smalley, Carol J., Clarksboro, NJ - To aid preparation of the William A. Smalley Collection for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD
Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$10,452

Brock, Cynthia Jensen

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
March 24, 2014
Project Title: 
Brock, Cynthia J., Goleta, CA - To aid preparation of the papers of Phillip Lee Walker for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Vietnam National University, Hanoi

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Vietnam National U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 29, 2011
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Vietnam National University, Hanoi, Vietnam - Institutional Development Grant

Vietnam National University-Hanoi is widely recognized as a leading university in Vietnam. Being one of its key research and training units, our Department of Anthropology has faculty members trained both in ethnology in Vietnam and Eastern Europe, and in Western anthropology. The aim of our Department of Anthropology is to become the leading center for anthropological reesearch and training in Vietnam, and through this process, to contribute to the development of a strong academic discipline of anthropology in Vietnam. Towards that objective, we want to pioneer to create a doctoral training program in social and cultural anthropology, which also includes the creation of a research-oriented academic environment, faculty and student training, and acquiring adequate learning resources to enhance the teaching and research capactiy of the department.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Friedlander, Eva

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
May 14, 2013
Project Title: 
Friedlander, Dr. Eva, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal papers and research materials of Dr. Owen Lynch for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Hittman, Michael

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Other
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
August 18, 2014
Project Title: 
Hittman, Dr. Michael, Brooklyn, NY - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with Special Collections, Univesity of Nevada Libraries, Reno, NV - Historical Archives Program

Other

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$3,000

Kratz, Corinne A.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 23, 2013
Project Title: 
Kratz, Dr. Corinne A., Tesuque, NM - To aid preparation of the personal research materials and professional papers of Dr. Ivan Karp, for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Nonaka, Angela Miyuki

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, Austin, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 7, 2010
Project Title: 
Nonaka, Dr. Angela M., U. of Texas, Austin, TX - To aid research and writing on ''It Takes a Village': Anthropological Analysis of Indigenous Sign Language Development and Decline in Thailand' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. ANGELA M. NONAKA, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship to aid research and writing on ''It Takes a Village:' Anthropological Analysis of Indigenous Sign Language Development and Decline in Thailand.' It Takes a Village is a 311-page manuscript that traces the life cycle of Ban Khor Sign Language. BKSL arose some 80 years ago in response to an unusually high incidence of hereditary deafness, and until recently was widely used in daily life by both hearing and deaf villagers, fostering participation and inclusion of the latter. This rare sociolinguistic ecology is undergoing dramatic changes, however, that threaten the continued vitality of BKSL, which is being supplanted by Thai Sign Language. Synthesizing more than a decade of continuous, holistic anthropological research, this study examines the causes and consequences of language emergence, maintenance, and shift. Ethnographically compelling on their own merits, the descriptive particulars of the Ban Khor case study have applied import for understanding the widespread endangerment of this rare sign language variety. This project also breaks new theoretical ground. By adopting a language socialization perspective that emphasizes interactional, use-based analysis of BKSL, this study counters key assumptions in formal linguistics about 'village' or 'indigenous' sign languages (and other lesser-known signing varieties), by demonstrating their full linguistic complexity and utility in situ, in the course of quotidian talk and interaction.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Smith, John Charles

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 3, 2005
Project Title: 
Smith, John Charles, St. Catherine's College, Oxford, United Kingdom - To aid Third Oxford-Kobe Linguistics Seminar: 'The Linguistics of Endangered Languages,' 2006, St. Catherine's College, in collaboration with Dr. Peter K. Austin

'The Linguistics of Endangered Languages'
April 2-6, 2006, Kobe Institute, Kobe, Japan
Organizers: Dr. John Charles Smith and Dr. Masayoshi Shibatani (Kobe Institute), and Dr. Peter K. Austin (St. Catherine's College - Oxford)

The Third Oxford-Kobe Linguistics Seminar brought together distinguished scholars from inside and outside Japan to present their research in the dedicated academic environment and so define the 'state of the art' in their discipline. The two previous Linguistics Seminars dealt with 'Language Change and Historical Linguistics' (2002) and 'The History and Structure of Japanese' (2004). The topic of 'The Linguistics of Endangered Languages' was chosen as the focus of the seminar because to elaborate on the point (often made, but less frequently demonstrated) that the loss of endangered languages means the loss of unique and unusual linguistic features that we would otherwise have no knowledge of, and that the extinction of languages inevitably results in a poorer linguistics and a poorer language and cultural heritage for the world as a whole. In addition to invited papers, a poster session was convened to highlight the work of junior scholars and graduate students in the field.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$9,000
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