Greenberg, James B.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 8, 2003
Project Title: 
Greenberg, Dr. James B., U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology Oral History Project
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$9,381

Kaplan, Flora S.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
August 25, 2014
Project Title: 
Kaplan, Dr. Flora E., New York, NY - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Lott, Dylan Thomas

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
January 7, 2015
Project Title: 
Lott, Dylan Thomas, U. Illinois, Chicago, IL - To aid preparation of the Waud Kracke collection for archival deposit with archives at the U. Illinois at Chicago, Indiana U., and the Museu do Indio in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$14,997

Rankin, Carolyn Ann

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
February 10, 2015
Project Title: 
Rankin, Carolyn, Lawrence, KS - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Robert Rankin for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Bird, Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
South Florida, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 9, 2006
Project Title: 
Bird, Dr. Elizabeth, U. of South Florida, Tampa, FL - To aid conference of SfAA on 'Global Insecurities, Global Solutions, and Applied Anthropology,' 2007, Tampa

'Collaborative Solutions to Global Insecurities: Challenges, Opportunities, and Potential'
March 27 - April 1, 2007, Downtown Hyatt Hotel, Tampa, Florida
Organizer: Dr. Elizabeth Bird (University of South Florida)

The grant supported a special session at the meetings of the Society for Applied Anthropology. The panel focused on three ongoing international partnerships between research teams at the University of South Florida and collaborators in three countries - Honduras, Lesotho, and Ecuador. Each collaboration involves work on a pressing global issue - land use and cultural heritage; HIV/AIDS intervention; and the social impact of natural disasters. The session focused not on results but on the process of effectively building such partnerships, with participants sharing ideas and strategies with audience members. As well as the lessons learned from the discussion at the event, all three teams agreed that the session acted as a catalyst to park ideas, and has had a significant role in taking all three to another level of effective collaboration, with several major grant proposals resulting.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Sutton, Constance R.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 9, 2001
Project Title: 
Sutton, Dr. Constance, New York U., New York, NY - To aid preparation of organizational materials of the International Women's Anthropology Conference and the New York Women's Anthropology Conference for archival deposit with New York University
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$3,000

Engelke, Christopher Robert

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 14, 2010
Project Title: 
Engelke, Christopher Robert, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'The Design and Use of Augmentative Alternative Communications Technologies,' supervised by Dr. Paul V. Kroskrity

CHRISTOPHER ENGELKE, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, received funding in October 2010 to aid research on 'The Design and Use of Augmentative: Alternative Communications Technologies,' supervised by Dr. Paul V. Kroskrity. Current figures suggest that over 2 million Americans have a disability that compromises their speech intelligibility, requiring them to use a special form of assistive technology called augmentative alternative communications (AAC) devices in order to literally and figuratively have 'a voice.' This study examines the phenomena of embodiment, empathy, and intersubjectivity that manifest around the design and use of these augmentative communications devices by examining the ways in which individuals' embodied and ideological familiarities with the world are revealed in their engagements with these specialized communications technologies. By investigating the ways that able-bodied designers approach the task of developing AAC technologies, this study uncovers relationships between one's physical abilities, normative prescriptions for action, and the forms and limits of understanding others whose bodily abilities may be radically different from one's own. Moreover, by examining the ways that AAC users take up the features of their devices in everyday interactions, this study reveals the unique ways in which this technology is incorporated into bodily understandings of the 'self' and its location in the world.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$22,045

Woolard, Kathryn Ann

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Diego, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 20, 2006
Project Title: 
Woolard, Dr. Kathryn Ann, U. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA - To aid 'A Longitudinal Study of Language Ideology, Policy, and Practices in Bilingual Barcelona'

DR. KATHRYN A. WOOLARD, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, received a grant in October 2006 to aid research on 'A Longitudinal Study of Language Ideology, Policy, and Practices in Bilingual Barcelona.' Language ideology and practice in Barcelona, Spain, were examined in comparison to research in 1979-80 and 1987. Sociolinguistic changes were assessed along three dimensions of the relation between Catalan and Castilian. First, changing linguistic practices across the life span, which were tracked through follow-up interviews of informants from 20 years earlier, revealed striking increases in use of Catalan by native Castilian speakers. Second, changes in adolescent cohorts' responses to Catalan-medium education, which were followed through a re-examination of a secondary school first studied in 1987 show the ability to use Catalan has increase, as has the claiming and ascription of Catalan identity. However, uses and perceptions of Catalan have narrowed. (While Catalan retains its high status, its youth solidarity value has diminished.) And third, changes in the public status of Catalan in relation to Castilian, as reflected in mass media and political campaigns, indicate public discourses about language policy are shifting from a foundation in an ideology of authenticity to one of anonymity that stresses universalism and cosmopolitanism. This shift responds to both increasingly strident anti-Catalan rhetoric and rapid demographic change, and it was evidenced in the campaign that resulted in the election of a non-native president of Catalonia

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Hall, Jennifer Lee

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Hall, Jennifer Lee, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Building Bridges: Language Ideology and Passerelle Literacy Education in Morocco,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine

JENNIFER L. HALL, then a student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'Building Bridges: Language Ideology and Passerelle Literacy Education in Morocco,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine. This dissertation research looks at mother tongue adult literacy education in Morocco through a case study of a new methodology called 'passerelle.' The grantee tested the hypothesis that passerelle -- by promoting Standard Arabic script as an ideologically neutral instrument for representing mother tongue languages -- presents an ideological conflict for learners and educators who may hold differing ideas as to the appropriateness of portraying traditionally oral languages in written form using Arabic script. Twelve months of comparative research was conducted on the ideologies of learners and educators in passerelle classrooms, in both urban and rural settings. The grantee observed that passerelle literacy educators tended to avoid utilizing mother tongue literacy activities in the classroom and instead relied on normative methods of Standard Arabic literacy teaching. They restricted the use of mother tongues languages in the classroom to oral activities and the use of Standard Arabic to writing activities, thus indicating that passerelle methodology did indeed present an ideological conflict. In contrast, most adult literacy learners did not express a similar ideological conflict and embraced opportunities to write in dialectical Arabic. This is partially due to the fact that many did not hold any preconceived notions about distinctions between oral and written Arabic.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,663

Kattan, Shlomy

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Kattan, Shlomy, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid 'Language Socialization and Language Ideologies among Israeli Emissaries: A Global Ethnography of Transnationalism,' supervised by Dr. Sahara Patricia Baquedano-Lopez

SHLOMY KATTAN, then a student at University of California, Berkeley, California, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Language Socialization and Language ideologies among Israeli Emissaries: A Global Ethnography of Transnationalism,' supervised by Dr. Sahara Patricia Baquedano-Lopez. This multi-sited ethnography examines language socialization, linguistic ideologies, and identity practices amongst families of Israeli emissaries and their young children, following their transition from Israel, through their residence in New York, and until their return to Israel after two years. During the first funded year of research, observations, interviews, and audio