Rosa, Jonathan Daniel

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rosa, Jonathan Daniel, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation’s Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

JONATHAN DANIEL ROSA, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation's Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. This grant supported twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork carried out between 2008-2009 within a newly created Chicago public high school whose student body was more than 90 percent Mexican and Puerto Rican. Observational, interview, and linguistic data include ongoing observations of more than 90 students, teachers, and administrators in the field site, as well as 40 in-depth interviews with students, teachers, and administrators. These data track: 1) the school's efforts toward transforming students; 2) students' shifting ideas about ethnoracial categories; and 3) the social sites in which distinctions between 'Mexicans' and 'Puerto Ricans' were undermined by emergent 'Latino' sensibilities. This research shows how processes of ethnoracial category making take shape as dialectic counterparts in relation to which language and literacy were understood and practiced in this field site. In particular, the linguistic findings reveal: 1) the profound redefinition of bilingualism as disability and 'languagelessness;' 2) students' strategies for escaping linguistic stigmatization; and 3) the semiotic operations that reduced students' expansive symbolic repertoires to criminality. This analysis of language and ethnoracial identity suggests the broader potential for people to look like a language and sound like a race across cultural contexts.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,960

Gibson, Roger

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 25, 2008
Project Title: 
Gibson, Roger, Middletown, MD - To aid preparation of the papers and research materials of Dr. Gordon D. Gibson for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Goldin, Liliana R.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Florida International U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2009
Project Title: 
Goldin, Dr. Liliana, Florida International U., Miami, FL - To aid '70th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology,' 2010, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

'70th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology'
March 24-28, 2010, Merida, Mexico
Organizers: Liliana R. Goldin (Florida International University)

Support from Wenner-Gren was instrumental in funding two panels composed of eleven Latin American scholars from Guatemala and Argentina. The first panel, entitled 'Human Development, Poverty and Inequality in Guatemala,' was composed of members of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). The second panel, entitled 'Transnational
Transformations, Local Responses: Argentine Anthropology Facing Globalization,' was composed of anthropologists from CONICET (Argentinean Scientific Research Council) as well as the University of Misiones and SUNY Binghamton. Both panels highlighted the excellence in research conducted by Latin American colleagues and showcased the sophisticated ways in which anthropologists engage problem-solving in what according to some measures constitute the margins of the world economy. The conference theme invited the exploration of the effects of globalization on the peoples with whom applied social scientists work resulting in higher levels of exclusion of vulnerability. As a result of the need for increased collaboration in interdisciplinary and transnational teams, the conference encouraged the discussion on the innovative theories and methods employed to make sense out of such complicated and interrelated problems.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,000

Engelke, Christopher Robert

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 14, 2010
Project Title: 
Engelke, Christopher Robert, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'The Design and Use of Augmentative Alternative Communications Technologies,' supervised by Dr. Paul V. Kroskrity

CHRISTOPHER ENGELKE, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, received funding in October 2010 to aid research on 'The Design and Use of Augmentative: Alternative Communications Technologies,' supervised by Dr. Paul V. Kroskrity. Current figures suggest that over 2 million Americans have a disability that compromises their speech intelligibility, requiring them to use a special form of assistive technology called augmentative alternative communications (AAC) devices in order to literally and figuratively have 'a voice.' This study examines the phenomena of embodiment, empathy, and intersubjectivity that manifest around the design and use of these augmentative communications devices by examining the ways in which individuals' embodied and ideological familiarities with the world are revealed in their engagements with these specialized communications technologies. By investigating the ways that able-bodied designers approach the task of developing AAC technologies, this study uncovers relationships between one's physical abilities, normative prescriptions for action, and the forms and limits of understanding others whose bodily abilities may be radically different from one's own. Moreover, by examining the ways that AAC users take up the features of their devices in everyday interactions, this study reveals the unique ways in which this technology is incorporated into bodily understandings of the 'self' and its location in the world.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$22,045

Chiarelli, Brunetto A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Int'l Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 12, 2001
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Florence, Italy (through Executive Secretary, IUAES) - To aid 15th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, 2003, Florence
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Barham, Lawrence S.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Liverpool, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
Barham, Dr. Lawrence, U. of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK -To aid 10th CHaGS conference on 'Resilience and Vulnerability in Hunter-Gatherer Research,' 2013, U. of Liverpool, in collaboration with Dr. Thomas Widlok

'10th Meeting of the Conference of Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHaGS)'
June 25-28, 2013, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Organizers: Lawrence Barham (U. Liverpool) and Thomas Widlok (Radboud U.)

Two hundred delegates from 25 countries took part in this long-awaited revival of the CHaGS tradition of interdisciplinary gatherings. The theme of 'Resilience and Vulnerability' provided the focus for discussing the status of contemporary hunter-gatherers and the future of hunter-gatherer research. Since the last meeting in 2002, the field of applied indigenous studies has continued to expand for which hunter-gatherer case studies remain invaluable. A new generation of evolutionary anthropologists has also emerged with innovative comparative approaches based on hunter-gatherer data. These differing approaches were brought together in the plenary sessions, which began each day. Highlights included lively debate on the role of warfare and violence in human evolution and the largest gathering of researchers on Dravidian-speaking hunter-gatherers. The conference concluded with a panel of young researchers representing a spectrum of interests, discussing their hopes for the future of hunter-gatherer studies. The legacy the Liverpool meeting has been the establishment of the International Society of Hunter-Gatherer Research (ISHGR) with CHaGS 11 to be held in Vienna in 2015.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Callan, Hilary Margaret West

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Royal Anthropological Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 16, 2004
Project Title: 
Royal Anthropological Institute, London, England - To aid preparation and organization of the RAI's historical materials for archival access
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Adair, Mary J.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Kansas, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
September 22, 2014
Project Title: 
Adair, Dr. Mary, U. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS - To aid preparation of the research materials of Dr. Robert Squier for archival deposit with the Biodiversity Institute at the U. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$14,521

Rodriguez, Juan Luis

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Southern Illinois U., Carbondale
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rodriguez, Juan Luis, Southern Illinois U., Carbondale, IL - To aid research on 'Rhetorical Strategies and Gift Circulation in the Politics of The Orinoco Delta, Venezuela,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan David Hill

JUAN LUIS RODRIGUEZ, then a student at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Rhetorical Strategies and Gift Circulation in the Politics of the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan D. Hill. This study analyses political discursive strategies and gift circulation in the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela. This is a semiotic and discourse-centered study on how the Warao indigenous population interacts with political representatives from the Venezuelan government. This study is based on a yearlong fieldwork focusing on political speeches and observing how political gifts are circulated. Research focused on public political events in which politicians, governmental representatives, and communal council's members perform public political discourses. During this year, the grantee followed the constitutional referendum of December 2007 and the organization of the 2008 regional election in the Orinoco Delta, as well as the development of the Morichito communal council in the Lower Delta. This helped in evaluating how gift circulation and political discourse intersect as semiotic strategies. The purpose of this research is to further advance the discourse-centered approaches to cultures developed in South America by addressing the ways in which discursive sign vehicles interact with other semiotic forms, especially political gifts. This type of analysis is central to understand recent political processes occurring among the Warao, as well as the general political climate of Venezuela since 1998 (the rising of President Hugo Chavez Frias).

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$23,900

White, Frances Joy

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oregon, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 9, 2008
Project Title: 
White, Dr. Frances J., U. of Oregon, Eugene, OR - To aid workshop on 'Human Warfare: An Integrative Anthropological Prospective,' 2008, U. of Oregon, in collaboration with Dr. Douglas Kennett

'Human Warfare: An Integrative Anthropological Perspective'
October 16-18, 2008, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon
Organizers: Frances J. White and Douglas Kennett, University of Oregon

This meeting addressed the need for an integrated model of the ancestral conditions that led to the emergence of warfare and/or to adaptations that evolved in response to those pressures. To this end, the conference brought together scholars from diverse anthropological sub-disciplines (e.g. primatology, paleo-anthropology, archaeology, behavioral ecology, ethnography) and related disciplines (e.g. political science, psychology, economics, evolutionary biology) whose work has significantly advanced knowledge on this topic but who would not otherwise have occasion to meet. The conference resulted in a book proposal, which has been enthusiastically received by Oxford University Press and will soon be sent out for review. This volume will constitute the first comprehensive evolutionary treatment of the ecological, social, and psychological processes involved in warfare.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$5,000
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