Strand, Thea Randina

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Strand, Thea Randina, U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid 'Varieties in Dialogue: A Historical and Ethnographic Study of Dialect Use and Shift in Rural Norway,' supervised by Dr. Jane H. Hill

THEA R. STRAND, then a student at University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Varieties in Dialogue: A Historical and Ethnographic Study of Dialect Use and Shift in Rural Norway,' supervised by Dr. Jane H. Hill. This research investigates the relationships between dialect use, language ideologies, and rural identities in the rural Norwegian valley of Valdres, as well as the direction of contemporary local dialect shift relative to the competing written norms of Bokmål and Nynorsk. During ethnographic fieldwork in 2007-2008, recordings of dialect use were collected from metalinguistic interviews, casual conversations, theater performances, and national media appearances by dialect speakers. Based on these recordings, as well as participant observation, this study combines an analysis of dominant discourses and ideologies of language with the close linguistic analysis of accent and grammatical forms associated with the Valdres dialect. Additionally, a long-term historical perspective is incorporated in order to explore the ways in which the 150-year history of language planning and struggle in Norway has contributed to the development of the contemporary linguistic situation. While previous research in Valdres has indicated long-term change in the direction of normative, regional urban speech, a central finding of this study is that dialect change today appears to be multi-directional -- both toward standard, urban Norwegian, and, simultaneously, toward new, markedly rural forms. The latter kind of change is clearly supported by local ideologies that have recently revalued rural culture, identity, and language.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$6,335

Enfield, Nicholas James

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Max Planck Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Enfield, Dr. Nicholas James, Max Planck Institute, Nijmegen, The Netherlands - To aid workshop on 'Dynamics of Human Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia,' 2009, Siem Reap, Cambodia, in collaboration with Dr. Joyce Carol White

'Dynamics of Human Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia'
January 7-10, 2009, Siem Reap, Cambodia
Organizers: Nicholas Enfield (Max Planck Instittute, Nijmegen) and Joyce White (University of Pennsylvania Museum)

This four-field meeting brought together an international group of linguists, social/cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, and physical/biological anthropologists, to address the following question: What is the nature of human diversity in mainland Southeast Asia, and how did it come to be this way? The focus of discussions was restricted spatially to
mainland Southeast Asia (centrally, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and the Malay Peninsula) and temporally to the Holocene (the last 11,000 years). Drawing upon exciting new developments in all sub-fields of anthropology in this area, scholars from different disciplines came together to update one another on the states of their respective arts, as well
as to identify new syntheses and new agendas for interdisciplinary research. Issues of homeland of ethnolinguistic groups, and of timing of migrations (especially of the Asian groups of peninsular Malaysia and Thailand, and more generally the Austroasiatic language family), were illuminated by considering different kinds of evidence from the most recent
research in historical linguistics, archaeology, and especially the latest results from bioarchaeology and genetics. None of the biggest questions were definitively solved, but the meeting succeeded in bringing all participants further along in the search for solutions, as well as forging some new scholarly relationships with the potential for future interdisciplinary collaborations.

Publication credit:

Enfield, N.J. 2011. Linguistic Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia. In Dynamics of Human Diversity: The Case of Mainland Southeast Asia. Pacific Linguistics. School of Culture, History and Language. College of Asia and the Pacific. The Australian National University: Canberra.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Wintle, Pamela

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 21, 2007
Project Title: 
Wintle, Dr. Pamela, Human Studies Film Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Dr. John Marshall -- Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Green, Elizabeth Mara

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2009
Project Title: 
Green, Elizabeth Mara, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'Everyday Signs: Deaf Sociality and Communicative Practices in Rural Nepal,' supervised by Dr. William F. Hanks

ELIZABETH MARA GREEN, then a student at the University of California, Berkeley, California, was awarded funding in May 2009, to aid research on 'Everyday Signs: Deaf Sociality and Communicative Practices in Rural Nepal,' supervised by Dr. William F. Hanks. An estimated 5,000-15,000 deaf people in Nepal are Nepali Sign Language (NSL) users and participants in an urban-centered, national deaf community. In contrast, the majority of deaf Nepalis -- some 190,000 according to one frequently quoted figure -- never learn, or even encounter, NSL. Without access to a shared language, these deaf people, along with their hearing interlocutors, develop localized gestural systems to communicate. The researcher conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Kathmandu, the capital, and Maunabudhuk, a village in the east, with local signers. The findings suggest that local sign is both like and unlike communication that occurs when using a standard language; while both rely on conventions, the former has a much smaller and less stable repertoire, such that it is characterized not only by successes but also by frequent misunderstandings and a very tightly-bound relationship to social and interactional context. The dissertation will explore more fully how deaf local signers and their hearing family members, neighbors, and friends draw on shared personal experiences, tacit social knowledge, and the material landscape to produce meaningful signs and meaningful lives.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$4,069

Kaplan, Flora S.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
August 25, 2014
Project Title: 
Kaplan, Dr. Flora E., New York, NY - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Lott, Dylan Thomas

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
January 7, 2015
Project Title: 
Lott, Dylan Thomas, U. Illinois, Chicago, IL - To aid preparation of the Waud Kracke collection for archival deposit with archives at the U. Illinois at Chicago, Indiana U., and the Museu do Indio in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$14,997

Rankin, Carolyn Ann

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
February 10, 2015
Project Title: 
Rankin, Carolyn, Lawrence, KS - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Robert Rankin for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Berlin, Overton Brent

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 22, 2011
Project Title: 
Berlin, Dr. Overton Brent, U. of Georgia, Athens, GA - To aid preparation of the personal research collections of Brent and Elois Ann Berlin for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Sussman, Robert Wald

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Sussman, Dr. Robert Wald, Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid workshop on 'Man The Hunted: The Evolution and Nature of Human Sociality, Cooperation, and Altruism,' 2009, Washington U., in collaboration with Dr. C. Robert Cloninger

'Man the Hunted: Sociality, Altruism, and Well-Being'
March 12-14, 2009, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
Organizers: Robert Sussman (Washington University) and C. Robert Cloninger (Washington University, School of Medicine)

All diurnal primates live in social groups. This is widely recognized as a predator protection mechanism. The more eyes and ears to detect predators and animals to mob them, the better the group is protected. Early humans traditionally have been thought of as hunters. However, because of their small size, dentition, lack of hunting tools, and a number of other
factors, it is more likely that the earliest humans, like most other primates, were prey species rather than predators. Social scientists, pyschologists, and biologists are learning that there is more to cooperation in group-living animals than an investment in one’s own nepotistic patch of DNA. Research in a diversity of scientific disciplines is revealing that there are many biological and behavioral mechanisms that humans and nonhuman primates use to reinforce pro-social or cooperative behavior. Sociality, cooperation, inter-individual dependency, and mutual protection are all part of the toolkit of social-living prey. In this symposium, participants explored this hypothesis and many of the mechanisms nonhuman primates and humans may have evolved as protection against predators, including cooperation, sociality, and altruism. Further, they explored how behavioral, hormonal, and neuro-psychiatric mechanisms related to our evolution as a prey species might be affecting modern human behavior.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$12,100

Engelbrecht, Beate S.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Gottingen, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 23, 2001
Project Title: 
Engelbrecht, Dr. Beate, Institute for Scientific Research, Goettingen, Germany - To aid conference on origins of visual anthropology: putting the past together, 2000, IWF- Institute for Scientific Film, in collaboration with Dr. Rolf Husmann
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$15,000