Silverman, Sydel

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 29, 2011
Project Title: 
Silverman, Dr. Sydel, Irvington, NY - to aid preparation of personal research and professional materials for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Floyd, Simeon Isaac

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Max Planck Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 17, 2011
Project Title: 
Floyd, Dr. Simeon I., Max Planck Inst., Nijmegen, Netherlands - To aid workshop on 'The Grammar of Knowledge Asymmetries: 'Conjunct/Disjunct' Alignment from a Cross-Linguistic Perspective,' 2011, Boulder, CO, in collaboration with Dr. Lila San Roque

Preliminary abstract: Knowledge is negotiated in speech according to specific norms of interaction and grammar. 'Conjunct/Disjunct' (C/D) alignment systems are an under-studied grammatical expression of such negotiations. Verbs are marked as 'conjunct' in first person statements or in second person questions, and as 'disjunct' in other situations, picking out the participant with the highest epistemic authority. C/D systems have been described for languages of the Himalayas, the Caucasus, Andean South America and Highlands New Guinea, but have not yet been well-studied in cross-linguistic perspective. C/D systems are relevant for theories of social cognition: the morphology reflects the exchangeability of viewpoint with others, a topic that is currently being taken up as 'intersubjectivity' in linguistic and evolutionary anthropology, as well as in interaction studies. This workshop will bring together for the first time specialists working in four geographic areas where C/D alignment is attested to form a scholarly community, address conceptual and terminological divides between specific regional traditions and build towards a cross-linguistically viable framework for further work. A focus on C/D forms in interaction will highlight their relevance for social behavior more broadly, allowing this emerging area of linguistic typology to contribute to research on the social organization of intersubjective knowledge.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$14,700

University of Latvia

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Latvia, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 3, 2014
Project Title: 
To support development of a joint doctoral program in anthropology at University of Latvia, Riga Stradins University (Latvia), University of Tallinn (Estonia) and Vytautus Magnus University (Lithuania) - Institutional Development Grant

Preliminary abstract: The aim of the Institutional Development Project is to support development of a regional doctoral program in social and cultural anthropology in the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. The project will bring together four universities, three of which have already entered into a collaborative framework for the implementation of tertiary level education through establishment of the Baltic Graduate School in 2008. The project will support the establishment of a separate doctoral program in anthropology within the framework of the Baltic Graduate School and thus will also contribute to strengthening the discipline of anthropology in the Baltics. More specifically, the project will stupport staff training through a partnership arrangement with the University of Manchester, aid student mobility (including for research training purposes), organization of an international lecture series and thematic and methodological seminars and summer schools, as well as through building up the textual and technical resource base in anthropology in the Baltics. This will strengthen the steps already taken in the region to make anthropology a valued discipline, academically and publicly, within this area poised for potential growth.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Harris, John William Kendal

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rutgers U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Harris, Dr. John William Kendal, Rutgers U., New Brunswick, NJ; and Mbua, Dr. Emma N., National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya - To aid collaborative research on 'International Collaborative Paleoanthropological Research Project (lcpr), Ileret, Kenya'
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$29,750

Kealiinohomoku, Joann W.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
February 11, 2013
Project Title: 
Kealiinohomoku, Joann W., Flagstaff, AZ - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the Cross-Cultural Dance Resources Collection at Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$14,667

Maranda, Pierre

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Laval, Quebec, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 11, 2010
Project Title: 
Maranda, Dr. Pierre, Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada - To aid preparation of the unpublished research materials of Dr. Elli Kongas Maranda for archival deposit with the Musee de la Civilisation, Quebec, Canada
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$14,835

Quincey, Jennifer Anne

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Quincey, Jennifer Anne, Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid research on 'Welsh Language Revitalization: Normative Signals and Adult Linguistic Socialization,' supervised by Dr. John Richard Bowen

JENNIFER QUINCEY, a student at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, received funding in April 2006 to support research on 'Welsh Language Revitalization: Normative Signals and Adult Linguistic Socialization', supervised by Dr. John Bowen. A surge in interest in Welsh language education has followed the recent, dramatic reversal in the status of the Welsh language. This research centers on a contested, emergent variety of Welsh unique to Welsh for Adults (WfA) classrooms. Designed to be linguistically and ideologically 'neutral', this variety's existence has exposed and created conflicting conceptions of linguistic legitimacy at a critical juncture in the project of Welsh language revitalization. Based on participant observation in advanced WfA classes and in a WfA teacher-training course, this research focused on the ways in which adult learners construct unique definitions of legitimacy; the process by which prospective WfA teachers, a key source of normative signals that adult learners encounter, are trained to transmit this language variety; and the effects of learners' language behavior on the wider Welsh language community, ranging from the level of individual interaction to the emergence of an alternative model of citizenship and belonging in post-devolution Britain.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$17,840

Brown, Clayton D.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pittsburgh, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 31, 2006
Project Title: 
Brown, Clayton D., U. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA - To aid oral-history interviews with eight Chinese ethnologists and archaeologists on 'Defining the Self.'
Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$4,915

Slotta, James

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Slotta, James, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Dialect, Register, & the Big-Man: Social Organization of Sporadic Linguistic Innovations in Yupno, Papua New Guinea,' supervised by Dr. Michael Silverstein

JAMES SLOTTA, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, was awarded a grant in May 2007 to aid research on 'Dialect, Register, & the Big-Man: Social Organization of Sporadic Linguistic Innovations in Yupno, Papua New Guinea,' supervised by Dr. Michael Silverstein. The research has resulted in the detailed documentation of five dialects of the previously undocumented Yopno language (Papua New Guinea). In addition to documenting the relatively stable features of the phonology and grammar, dozens of hours of recordings of natural speech were transcribed to provide access to the more variable and evanescent qualities of Yopno speech, as well as to provide an indication of the textual and social emplacement of Yopno language material in various Yopno communities. The research highlights the far-reaching ways that social, cultural, and textual factors structure Yopno grammar and phonology, as well as the diversity of Yopno dialects. All Yopno speakers have some familiarity with several of the many dialects of the language and use words from other dialects in interactions to construct and maintain ties of relatedness to relatives outside of their patrilineal clans who live in other dialect areas. The tension between patrilineal relatedness as a basis for clan formation and cognatic relatedness as a basis for village and larger units of social organization and exchange gets played out interactionally through the use of linguistic variants. The organization of such multi-dialectalism is an important factor in constructing an adequate description of Yopno phonology.

Publication Credit:

Slotta, James. 2014. Revelations of the World: Transnationalism and the Politics of Perception in Papua New Guinea. American Anthropologist 116(3):626-642.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$10,860