Kulick, Don

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Kulick, Dr. Don, New York U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'The Dying Language that Didn't Die: 20 Years Later in Gapun, PNG'

DR. DON KULICK, New York University, New York, New York, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'The Dying Language that Didn't Die: 20 Years Later in Gapun, PNG'. Research followed up original research conducted in the late 1980s studying a small Papua New Guinean village called Gapun and of the isolate vernacular language, Taiap, that is spoken only there. Eight months of fieldwork in 2009 revealed that Taiap is still spoken in Gapun, but it is dying. The total population of fluent and semi-fluent speakers is about 60. Villagers in their early 20s and younger continue to understand the language, and can even produce it when asked to by a visiting anthropologist. But they do not use Taiap in any context. Fieldwork has resulted in enough material to analyze the dynamics of the language death in the village, and to write a dictionary and grammar of Taiap. Research also focused on how the young people who can speak some Taiap produce versions of the vernacular that are regularized, simplified, and etiolated. This material will allow analysis that charts the grammatical disintegration of a Papuan language. A further study of how women who were children in the 1980s socialize their children to use language will be able to address the question of whether or not language socialization patterns endure across generations.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Merlan, Francesca C.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 2, 2012
Project Title: 
Merlan, Dr. Francesca C., Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Marie Reay for archival deposit with the Archives of the Australian National University - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Addis Ababa University

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Addis Ababa U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 22, 2012
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - Institutional Development Grant

The Department of Social Anthropology at Addis Ababa University launched a Ph.D program in 2010 on its own. In collaboration with anthropology departments in Europe, US, and Japan, the Department now intends to improve the theoretical and methodological training of Ph.D. students. The IDG grant will be used to intensify international exposure and exchange; improve the quality of anthropological training by bringing in experienced guest lectuerers and disseration co-advisors and examiners; upgrade the current curriculum in consultation with partner institutions; provide modest support for student field research; and build up the library and electronic resources. Ethiopia has a great need for highly trained anthropologists in academic and non-academic positions and the IDG will help the Department to train future generations to fill these positions. It will also help promote anthropology as an academic discipline in Ethiopia, where it is little known. By training local anthropologists who will do their fieldwork in their own country, we also wish to achieve a greater transparency in the dissemination of results among the researched communities and thus achieve a greater engagement.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Rosa, Jonathan Daniel

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rosa, Jonathan Daniel, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation’s Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

JONATHAN DANIEL ROSA, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation's Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. This grant supported twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork carried out between 2008-2009 within a newly created Chicago public high school whose student body was more than 90 percent Mexican and Puerto Rican. Observational, interview, and linguistic data include ongoing observations of more than 90 students, teachers, and administrators in the field site, as well as 40 in-depth interviews with students, teachers, and administrators. These data track: 1) the school's efforts toward transforming students; 2) students' shifting ideas about ethnoracial categories; and 3) the social sites in which distinctions between 'Mexicans' and 'Puerto Ricans' were undermined by emergent 'Latino' sensibilities. This research shows how processes of ethnoracial category making take shape as dialectic counterparts in relation to which language and literacy were understood and practiced in this field site. In particular, the linguistic findings reveal: 1) the profound redefinition of bilingualism as disability and 'languagelessness;' 2) students' strategies for escaping linguistic stigmatization; and 3) the semiotic operations that reduced students' expansive symbolic repertoires to criminality. This analysis of language and ethnoracial identity suggests the broader potential for people to look like a language and sound like a race across cultural contexts.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,960

Danda, Ajit Kumar

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Indian Anthropological Society
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 1, 2010
Project Title: 
Danda, Dr. Ajith, Indian Anthropological Society, Kolkata, India - To aid Golden Jubilee conference of IAS on 'Locating Alternative Voices of Anthropology,' 2011, Kolkata, in collaboration with Dr. Rajat Kanti Das

Preliminary abstract: The International Symposium proposed to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of the Indian Anthropological Society will have the following dual objectives :1) To eveluate the contributions of anthropologists : Euro-American, Afro-Asian, and Latin American in the light of dualism : Western vs. non-Western, that pervades the field of anthropology. 2) To evaluate the contributions of intellectuals, social thinkers, and literary figures toward anthropology in the Indian contexts. The Western view of anthropology, as a political and colonial discourse, has been countered by anthropologists from Asia, Africa, and Latin America in a way that may be understood as being based upon a rhetoric of equality reflected in the establishment of self-identity. It has discovered a voice to defend the rights of indigenes, tribes, and ethnic groups who were so long considered as products of a process of exclusion (Lindquist : 1966, Hulme : 1986,Todavor : 1987, Said : 1978, Mason : 1990, Thomas 1991, Danda : 1995, de-Certeau :1997). Though the American and European imagery of 'otherness' has been questened time and again, the Western discourses and practices are still regarded as guidelines for others to follow. Isn't it possible to look at anything but a product of the Western discourses and practices? This is the major issue to be debated in the proposed symposium.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Sussman, Robert Wald

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Sussman, Dr. Robert Wald, Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid workshop on 'Man The Hunted: The Evolution and Nature of Human Sociality, Cooperation, and Altruism,' 2009, Washington U., in collaboration with Dr. C. Robert Cloninger

'Man the Hunted: Sociality, Altruism, and Well-Being'
March 12-14, 2009, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
Organizers: Robert Sussman (Washington University) and C. Robert Cloninger (Washington University, School of Medicine)

All diurnal primates live in social groups. This is widely recognized as a predator protection mechanism. The more eyes and ears to detect predators and animals to mob them, the better the group is protected. Early humans traditionally have been thought of as hunters. However, because of their small size, dentition, lack of hunting tools, and a number of other
factors, it is more likely that the earliest humans, like most other primates, were prey species rather than predators. Social scientists, pyschologists, and biologists are learning that there is more to cooperation in group-living animals than an investment in one’s own nepotistic patch of DNA. Research in a diversity of scientific disciplines is revealing that there are many biological and behavioral mechanisms that humans and nonhuman primates use to reinforce pro-social or cooperative behavior. Sociality, cooperation, inter-individual dependency, and mutual protection are all part of the toolkit of social-living prey. In this symposium, participants explored this hypothesis and many of the mechanisms nonhuman primates and humans may have evolved as protection against predators, including cooperation, sociality, and altruism. Further, they explored how behavioral, hormonal, and neuro-psychiatric mechanisms related to our evolution as a prey species might be affecting modern human behavior.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$12,100

Garrison Arensberg, Vivian E.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 2, 2011
Project Title: 
Garrison Arensberg, Dr. Vivian, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Conrad Arensberg for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Wintle, Pamela

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 25, 2009
Project Title: 
Wintle, Dr. Pamela, Human Studies Film Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Dr. Jorge Preloran -- Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Scie

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 19, 2010
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Manchester, UK (through IUAES org. John Gledhill) - To aid '17th Congress of the IUAES: Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds,' 2013, Manchester

'Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds: The 17th Congress of the International Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences'
August 5-10, 2013, Manchester University, Manchester, United Kingdom
Organizer: Dr. John Gledhill (Manchester U.)

This truly global congress brought together 1260 anthropologists from sixty-five countries to present 1283 papers in 211 parallel session panels, which successfully promoted dialogue between scholars from different countries and across sub-field boundaries. This networking will be consolidated in the future through the system of IUAES commissions that was reinvigorated at the event. The use of thematic tracks for the parallel sessions worked well in producing innovative and focused panels, the Museum Anthropology track involved international conversations that included countries such as China, and the Visual Anthropology program included several imaginative complements to the normal film-screenings and panel presentations. Wenner-Gren's central role in the promotion of world anthropology and the IUAES was entertainingly presented in Leslie Aiello's inaugural keynote address. Lourdes Arizpe and Howard Morphy gave additional keynotes sponsored by ASA and RAI respectively. Three plenaries consisted of debates between four key speakers, with additional audience participation, another well-received innovation that sharpened the presentation of issues and ensured global diversity amongst the plenary speakers. The final plenary was a panel discussion on World Anthropologies. This and two other panels were sponsored by WCAA. Edited videos of the plenary sessions are now available on YouTube, and various print publications are also in preparation.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Laderman, Michael

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant