Merlan, Francesca C.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 2, 2012
Project Title: 
Merlan, Dr. Francesca C., Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Marie Reay for archival deposit with the Archives of the Australian National University - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Addis Ababa University

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Addis Ababa U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 22, 2012
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia - Institutional Development Grant

The Department of Social Anthropology at Addis Ababa University launched a Ph.D program in 2010 on its own. In collaboration with anthropology departments in Europe, US, and Japan, the Department now intends to improve the theoretical and methodological training of Ph.D. students. The IDG grant will be used to intensify international exposure and exchange; improve the quality of anthropological training by bringing in experienced guest lectuerers and disseration co-advisors and examiners; upgrade the current curriculum in consultation with partner institutions; provide modest support for student field research; and build up the library and electronic resources. Ethiopia has a great need for highly trained anthropologists in academic and non-academic positions and the IDG will help the Department to train future generations to fill these positions. It will also help promote anthropology as an academic discipline in Ethiopia, where it is little known. By training local anthropologists who will do their fieldwork in their own country, we also wish to achieve a greater transparency in the dissemination of results among the researched communities and thus achieve a greater engagement.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Rosa, Jonathan Daniel

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rosa, Jonathan Daniel, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation’s Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

JONATHAN DANIEL ROSA, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation's Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. This grant supported twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork carried out between 2008-2009 within a newly created Chicago public high school whose student body was more than 90 percent Mexican and Puerto Rican. Observational, interview, and linguistic data include ongoing observations of more than 90 students, teachers, and administrators in the field site, as well as 40 in-depth interviews with students, teachers, and administrators. These data track: 1) the school's efforts toward transforming students; 2) students' shifting ideas about ethnoracial categories; and 3) the social sites in which distinctions between 'Mexicans' and 'Puerto Ricans' were undermined by emergent 'Latino' sensibilities. This research shows how processes of ethnoracial category making take shape as dialectic counterparts in relation to which language and literacy were understood and practiced in this field site. In particular, the linguistic findings reveal: 1) the profound redefinition of bilingualism as disability and 'languagelessness;' 2) students' strategies for escaping linguistic stigmatization; and 3) the semiotic operations that reduced students' expansive symbolic repertoires to criminality. This analysis of language and ethnoracial identity suggests the broader potential for people to look like a language and sound like a race across cultural contexts.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,960

Danda, Ajit Kumar

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Indian Anthropological Society
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 1, 2010
Project Title: 
Danda, Dr. Ajith, Indian Anthropological Society, Kolkata, India - To aid Golden Jubilee conference of IAS on 'Locating Alternative Voices of Anthropology,' 2011, Kolkata, in collaboration with Dr. Rajat Kanti Das

Preliminary abstract: The International Symposium proposed to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of the Indian Anthropological Society will have the following dual objectives :1) To eveluate the contributions of anthropologists : Euro-American, Afro-Asian, and Latin American in the light of dualism : Western vs. non-Western, that pervades the field of anthropology. 2) To evaluate the contributions of intellectuals, social thinkers, and literary figures toward anthropology in the Indian contexts. The Western view of anthropology, as a political and colonial discourse, has been countered by anthropologists from Asia, Africa, and Latin America in a way that may be understood as being based upon a rhetoric of equality reflected in the establishment of self-identity. It has discovered a voice to defend the rights of indigenes, tribes, and ethnic groups who were so long considered as products of a process of exclusion (Lindquist : 1966, Hulme : 1986,Todavor : 1987, Said : 1978, Mason : 1990, Thomas 1991, Danda : 1995, de-Certeau :1997). Though the American and European imagery of 'otherness' has been questened time and again, the Western discourses and practices are still regarded as guidelines for others to follow. Isn't it possible to look at anything but a product of the Western discourses and practices? This is the major issue to be debated in the proposed symposium.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Sussman, Robert Wald

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Sussman, Dr. Robert Wald, Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid workshop on 'Man The Hunted: The Evolution and Nature of Human Sociality, Cooperation, and Altruism,' 2009, Washington U., in collaboration with Dr. C. Robert Cloninger

'Man the Hunted: Sociality, Altruism, and Well-Being'
March 12-14, 2009, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
Organizers: Robert Sussman (Washington University) and C. Robert Cloninger (Washington University, School of Medicine)

All diurnal primates live in social groups. This is widely recognized as a predator protection mechanism. The more eyes and ears to detect predators and animals to mob them, the better the group is protected. Early humans traditionally have been thought of as hunters. However, because of their small size, dentition, lack of hunting tools, and a number of other
factors, it is more likely that the earliest humans, like most other primates, were prey species rather than predators. Social scientists, pyschologists, and biologists are learning that there is more to cooperation in group-living animals than an investment in one’s own nepotistic patch of DNA. Research in a diversity of scientific disciplines is revealing that there are many biological and behavioral mechanisms that humans and nonhuman primates use to reinforce pro-social or cooperative behavior. Sociality, cooperation, inter-individual dependency, and mutual protection are all part of the toolkit of social-living prey. In this symposium, participants explored this hypothesis and many of the mechanisms nonhuman primates and humans may have evolved as protection against predators, including cooperation, sociality, and altruism. Further, they explored how behavioral, hormonal, and neuro-psychiatric mechanisms related to our evolution as a prey species might be affecting modern human behavior.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$12,100

Garrison Arensberg, Vivian E.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 2, 2011
Project Title: 
Garrison Arensberg, Dr. Vivian, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Conrad Arensberg for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Wintle, Pamela

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 25, 2009
Project Title: 
Wintle, Dr. Pamela, Human Studies Film Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Dr. Jorge Preloran -- Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Hsiao, Chi-hua

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 12, 2011
Project Title: 
Hsiao, Chi-hua, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'Subtitle Groups as Cultural Translators in China,' supervised by Dr. Elinor Ochs

CHI-HUA HSIAO, then a student at University of California, Los Angeles, California, received funding in October 2011 to aid research on 'Subtitle Groups as Cultural Translators in China,' supervised by Dr. Elinor Ochs. This dissertation project examines the phenomenon of cultural translation in the context of an underground network of Internet-based amateur translators in China. Informal volunteer subtitle groups emerged in the mid-1990s and began catering to the younger generation's thirst for U.S. media popular culture. These translators add Chinese-language subtitles to programs, post the shows online for free downloads, and provide a network for online interactions. The subtitling activity reflects the younger Chinese generation's articulation of new morality discourses and their challenges to the state-party monopoly of information. The younger generation attempts to establish its own moral justifications as a form of resistance to the regime surveillance and in adherence to individual life-enriching practices. This study explores how Chinese volunteer subtitlers construct representations of U.S. television programs and films and how these representations relate to the globalization of sociocultural ideologies. It offers insights into how the collaborative volunteer efforts of subtitle groups acting as cultural brokers represent a new paradigm of morality among Chinese youth and young adults of the virtual community and how such initiatives influence the younger generation's perceptions of foreign popular culture as part of the larger globalized flow of information.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$4,160

Laderman, Michael

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 11, 2012
Project Title: 
Laderman, Michael, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Carol Laderman for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$3,950

Minks, Amanda Gail

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 7, 2002
Project Title: 
Minks, Amanda, Columbia U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'Expressive Practices and Identity Formation among Miskitu Children,' supervised by Dr. Aaron A. Fox

AMANDA MINKS, while a student at Columbia University, New York, New York, received funding in June 2002 to aid research on 'Expressive Practices and Identity Formation among Miskitu Children,' supervised by Dr. Aaron A. Fox. In the past thirty years, Miskitu Indians have migrated in increasing numbers from mainland Nicaragua to Com Island, off the Caribbean coast. This migration has transformed the social and political landscape of the island, which, since the nineteenth century, has been populated primarily by English-speaking Creole people. Also transformed are the expressive and socializing practices of Miskitu islanders. The aim of the research supported by Wenner-Gren was to document the repertoires of Miskitu children's expressive practices across a range of contexts, providing a lens on shifting processes of socialization among peers and across generations. The term expressive practices encompasses a range of interrelated communicative activities (musical, linguistic, and kinetic) approached from the perspectives of style, performance, and poetics. The imagination is key not only in terms of children's play activities, but also in terms of developing social imaginaries that construct ties among people across time and space. Children were observed in formal socializing contexts, such as the school and the church, as well as the informal contexts of home and outdoor play spaces. Audio recordings of children's interaction were transcribed in collaboration with Miskitu consultants, and interviews were conducted with adults dealing with topics such as migration histories, gender roles, socialization practices, religion, and labor. This research attempts to make connections between the large-scale political and economic forces that are radically changing Com Island's social structure, and the small-scale interactions in which children are socialized - and socialize one another - in a multilingual, culturally diverse environment.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$11,000
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