Reuter, Thomas Anton

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Monash U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 23, 2009
Project Title: 
Reuter, Dr. Thomas A., Monash U., Clayton, Victoria, Australia - To aid WCAA conference on 'Opportunities and Challenges: Toward an Agenda for World Anthropology,' 2009, Kunming, China, in collaboration with Dr. Gustavo Ribeiro

'Opportunities and Challenges for International Cooperation and Participation in Anthropology: Toward an Agenda for World Anthropology'
July 27-31, 2009, Kunming, China
Organizers: Thomas A. Reuter (Monash University) and Gustavo Ribeiro (Universidade de Brasilia)

This symposium was an open forum at which cooperative efforts to facilitate international communication and collaboration among anthropologists and anthropological associations were discussed. Representatives of all WCAA member associations present at the 2009 IUAES World Congress (July 27-31, Kunming, China) were invited to contribute to the
meeting, together with key representatives of the IUAES. The discussion focused on the different roles of the WCAA, IUAES, regional and national associations, asking what each can accomplish and how they can support one another?s endeavors. Individual presentations focused on specific tasks within the overall goal of advancing cooperation and participation within the discipline globally. The discussion explored how such important tasks may be accomplished through existing institutional resources and collaborations. Each representative at the meeting was asked to report back to their governing board and membership on the forum?s ideas and proposals for collaboration. A joint publication of the
presentations is in progress.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Ammerman, Albert J.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Colgate U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 17, 2011
Project Title: 
Ammerman, Dr. Albert J., Colgate U., Hamilton, NY - To aid workshop on 'Island Archaeology and the Origins of Seafaring in the Eastern Mediterranean,' 2013, Reggio Calabria, Italy

'Island Archaeology and the Origins of Seafaring in the Eastern Mediterranean'
October 19-21, 2012, Reggio Calabria, Italy
Organizer: Dr. Albert J. Ammerman (Colgate U.)

The meeting constituted a new and rapidly emerging field of study in anthropology and archaeology, and brought together leading specialists to share recent findings, discuss new ideas, and move towards a new synthesis. Papers were presented on such topics as, 'Klimonas and its Contribution to the Study of Early Seafaring,' 'The Aegean Mesolithic: Material Culture Chronology, and Networks of Contact,' and 'Early Neolithic Settlements in Croatia and the Situation in the Adriatic Sea.' The workshop was truly international in character, including participants from the United States, France, Greece, Israel, Poland, Portugal, Turkey, and the United Kingdom, and accomplished its goal of gathering scholars from diverse perspectives and academic backgrounds. A highlight for participants was an afternoon of sailing on the Strait of Messina. A video of the experience can be found on the conference website, 'The First Argonauts,' http://seafaring.colgate.edu, along with images and information about research in this new field. Plans are in place to publish the proceedings in a double volume of the journal Eurasian Prehistory.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Tarlow, Sarah Alexandra

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Leicester, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Tarlow, Dr. Sarah, U. of Leicester, Leicester, UK - To aid conference of 'Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA),' 2013, Leicester, in collaboration with Dr. Zoe Crossland

'46th Annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology'
January 9-12, 2013, U. Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
Organizers: Dr. Sarah Tarlow (U. Leicester) and Dr. Zoe Crossland (Columbia U.)

The conference theme-'Globalization, Immigration, Transformation'-emphasized global connections past and present, aiming to include scholars who would not ordinarily attend the meetings in order to explore these issues. Funding enabled six archaeologists from different parts of Africa to take advantage of the conference's location in the UK and to participate in the conference in different roles. A special session on 'History, Archaeology, and Memory Work in African Contexts' was also constituted to bring together scholars working in Africa to discuss current research on the topic and to advertise perspectives from African historical archaeology to other participants in the conference.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,500

Edwards, Terra

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 3, 2010
Project Title: 
Edwards, Terra, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'Language, Embodiment, and Sociality in a Tactile Life-world: Communication Practices in Everyday Life among Deaf-Blind People in Seattle, Washington,' supervised by Dr. William F. Hanks

TERRA EDWARDS, then a student at the University of California, Berkeley, California, was awarded funding in May 2010, to aid research on 'Language, Embodiment, and Sociality in a Tactile Life-World: Communication Practices in Everyday Life among Deaf-Blind People in Seattle, Washington,' supervised by Dr. William F. Hanks. This project investigates language and communication practices in a community in Seattle, Washington, whose members are born deaf and, due to a genetic condition, lose their vision slowly. Most members grew up using visual American Sign Language (ASL). Upon moving to Seattle, they transition to a tactile mode of reception of ASL. Until recently, this transition was treated as a compensatory strategy. Thus, a single interaction often occurred in two different modalities: a sighted or partially sighted person would use visual reception, while their blind interlocutor used tactile reception. Despite this variation, it remained normative to organize access to the immediate environment along visual lines. Therefore, the more a person moved away from visual practices and orientations, the more reliant on interpreters they became. Then, in 2007, a 'pro-tactile' social movement took hold, calling for the cultivation of tactile dispositions regardless of sensory capacity. Once everyone-blind, sighted, and partially sighted- 'went tactile,' relations between linguistic forms and the social and physical environment were reconfigured and new grammatical sub-systems began to emerge. Ongoing research aims to understand how linguistic forms derived from visual ASL are calibrated to the contours of this emergent tactile world, yielding an emergent, tactile language.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$13,933

Yang, Jie

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Toronto, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
September 3, 2003
Project Title: 
Yang, Jie, Beijing Language & Culture U., Beijing, China - To aid training in anthropology at U. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, supervised by Dr. Hy Van Luong
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Gjording, Karin Jane

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
Gjording, Karin Jane, San Francisco, CA - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Chris Gjording for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$8,704

Chiarelli, Brunetto A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Int'l Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 2, 2003
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Florence, Italy (through Executive Secretary, IUAES) - To aid 15th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, 2003, Florence
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Leopold, Robert S.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 13, 2010
Project Title: 
Leopold, Robert S., National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Marvin Harris - Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Rodriguez, Juan Luis

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Southern Illinois U., Carbondale
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rodriguez, Juan Luis, Southern Illinois U., Carbondale, IL - To aid research on 'Rhetorical Strategies and Gift Circulation in the Politics of The Orinoco Delta, Venezuela,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan David Hill

JUAN LUIS RODRIGUEZ, then a student at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Rhetorical Strategies and Gift Circulation in the Politics of the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan D. Hill. This study analyses political discursive strategies and gift circulation in the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela. This is a semiotic and discourse-centered study on how the Warao indigenous population interacts with political representatives from the Venezuelan government. This study is based on a yearlong fieldwork focusing on political speeches and observing how political gifts are circulated. Research focused on public political events in which politicians, governmental representatives, and communal council's members perform public political discourses. During this year, the grantee followed the constitutional referendum of December 2007 and the organization of the 2008 regional election in the Orinoco Delta, as well as the development of the Morichito communal council in the Lower Delta. This helped in evaluating how gift circulation and political discourse intersect as semiotic strategies. The purpose of this research is to further advance the discourse-centered approaches to cultures developed in South America by addressing the ways in which discursive sign vehicles interact with other semiotic forms, especially political gifts. This type of analysis is central to understand recent political processes occurring among the Warao, as well as the general political climate of Venezuela since 1998 (the rising of President Hugo Chavez Frias).

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$23,900

Baker, Brenda Jane

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 31, 2011
Project Title: 
Baker, Dr. Brenda, Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ - To aid workshop on 'Disruptions as a Cause and Consequence of Migration in Human History,' 2012, Saguaro Lake Ranch, Mesa, AZ, in collaboration with Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda

'Disruptions as a Cause and Consequence of Migration in Human History'
May 3-5, 2011, Saguaro Lake Ranch, Mesa, Arizona
Organizers: Dr. Brenda Baker & Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda (Arizona State U.)

Migration has been integral to the development of human societies since the emergence of our species and has continuously reshaped the economic, ethnic, and political dynamics of various societies over time, yet little dialogue has occurred between scholars examining contemporary and past migrations. This workshop was intended to stimulate an intellectual exchange among sociocultural anthropologists, archaeologists, bioarchaeologists, and others who study migration to analyze the extent to which environmental and social disruptions have been a cause of migration over time and whether these migratory flows have in turn led to disruptive consequences for the societies that receive them. Another goal was to help develop an understanding of common processes operating in past and present migrations. An initial conceptual framework developed by a collaborative group of faculty from Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change was circulated to workshop participants to help guide articulation with common themes and stimulate discussion. Presentations and lively discussions were geared toward developing our understanding of the relationship between disruptions and population displacements from prehistory to the present. This workshop has resulted in the submission of revised papers for publication in an edited volume.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$10,000
Syndicate content