Tribhuvan University

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Tribhuvan U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 2, 2009
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal - Institutional Development Grant

Through a collaboration with Cornell University, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tribhuvan University aims to bring improve the theoretical and methodological training of Ph.D students and upgrade the credentials of current faculty who do not hold a Ph.D. The IDG grant will be used to upgrade the current curriculum, provide modest support for research, intensify international exposure and exchange and build up the library and electronic resources. Currently in Nepal, the research agenda in anthropology is frequently determined by NGOs and development agencies where many of the students and faculty gain their experience. The IDG will allow more freedom for the department itself to determine its academic concerns. A primary aim is to significantly improve the theoretical and methodological capacity of the anthropology department as apposed to applied/development anthropology, thereby allowing the department to be competitive and contribute internationally.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Ember, Carol R.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Yale U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 31, 2009
Project Title: 
Ember, Dr. Carol R., Human Relations Area Files, Inc., New Haven, CT - To aid workshop on digital preservation of primary anthropological data, co-sponsored with the National Science Foundation, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Zimman, Lal

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Colorado, Boulder, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 13, 2010
Project Title: 
Zimman, Lal, U. of Colorado, Boulder, CO - To aid research on 'Talking like a Man: Identity, Socialization, Biology, and the Gendered Voice among Female-to-Male Transsexuals,' supervised by Dr. Kira Hall

LAL ZIMMAN, then a student at University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, received a grant in October 2010 to aid research on 'Talking like a Man: Identity, Socialization, Biology, and the Gendered Voice among Female-to-Male Transsexuals,' supervised by Dr. Kira Hall. As a window into the relationship between gender and the voice, this study combines methods from linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics to analyze the changing voices of female-to-male transgender people. Fifteen trans men and others on the female-to-male identity spectrum were recorded in a variety of contexts during their first 1-2 years of hormone therapy. Testosterone, which is one of the most popular medical interventions among trans men, can spur dramatic changes in the larynx along with other so-called 'secondary' sex characteristics. By tracking changes in pitch as well as speaking style, this study underscores the intertwined nature of embodiment, socialization, and identity work, which may or may not be aligned in predictable ways. Trans men, who were raised in a female gender role but do not see themselves as women, clearly represent atypical combinations of physiology, early life socialization, and self-defined gender identity. With the marked biological changes that testosterone brings about, these trans speakers also demonstrate the diversity of speaking styles that can be perceived as male-sounding. Ultimately this study shed lights on the inextricable relationship between the body and social practice while simultaneously problematizing the notion that voices can be unproblematically categorized as 'female' or 'male.'

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$19,950

Goldin, Liliana R.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Florida International U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2009
Project Title: 
Goldin, Dr. Liliana, Florida International U., Miami, FL - To aid '70th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology,' 2010, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

'70th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology'
March 24-28, 2010, Merida, Mexico
Organizers: Liliana R. Goldin (Florida International University)

Support from Wenner-Gren was instrumental in funding two panels composed of eleven Latin American scholars from Guatemala and Argentina. The first panel, entitled 'Human Development, Poverty and Inequality in Guatemala,' was composed of members of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). The second panel, entitled 'Transnational
Transformations, Local Responses: Argentine Anthropology Facing Globalization,' was composed of anthropologists from CONICET (Argentinean Scientific Research Council) as well as the University of Misiones and SUNY Binghamton. Both panels highlighted the excellence in research conducted by Latin American colleagues and showcased the sophisticated ways in which anthropologists engage problem-solving in what according to some measures constitute the margins of the world economy. The conference theme invited the exploration of the effects of globalization on the peoples with whom applied social scientists work resulting in higher levels of exclusion of vulnerability. As a result of the need for increased collaboration in interdisciplinary and transnational teams, the conference encouraged the discussion on the innovative theories and methods employed to make sense out of such complicated and interrelated problems.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,000

Johnson, Amber L

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Truman State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 27, 2012
Project Title: 
Johnson, Amber, Kirksville, MO - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Lewis Binford for archival deposit with the Pickler Memorial Library, Truman State U., Kirksville, MO - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Maranda, Pierre

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Laval, Quebec, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 11, 2010
Project Title: 
Maranda, Dr. Pierre, Universite Laval, Quebec, Canada - To aid preparation of the unpublished research materials of Dr. Elli Kongas Maranda for archival deposit with the Musee de la Civilisation, Quebec, Canada
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$14,835

Rosa, Jonathan Daniel

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Rosa, Jonathan Daniel, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation?s Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

JONATHAN DANIEL ROSA, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Learning to Hear a Nation's Limits: Language Ideologies and Ethnoracial Subjectivity in U.S. High Schools,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. This grant supported twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork carried out between 2008-2009 within a newly created Chicago public high school whose student body was more than 90 percent Mexican and Puerto Rican. Observational, interview, and linguistic data include ongoing observations of more than 90 students, teachers, and administrators in the field site, as well as 40 in-depth interviews with students, teachers, and administrators. These data track: 1) the school's efforts toward transforming students; 2) students' shifting ideas about ethnoracial categories; and 3) the social sites in which distinctions between 'Mexicans' and 'Puerto Ricans' were undermined by emergent 'Latino' sensibilities. This research shows how processes of ethnoracial category making take shape as dialectic counterparts in relation to which language and literacy were understood and practiced in this field site. In particular, the linguistic findings reveal: 1) the profound redefinition of bilingualism as disability and 'languagelessness;' 2) students' strategies for escaping linguistic stigmatization; and 3) the semiotic operations that reduced students' expansive symbolic repertoires to criminality. This analysis of language and ethnoracial identity suggests the broader potential for people to look like a language and sound like a race across cultural contexts.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$18,960

Bangali, Lamissa

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National School for Administration
Status: 
Lapsed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
June 18, 2002
Project Title: 
Bangali, Lamissa, ENAM, Burkina Faso - To cover air fare to Burkina Faso and cost of shipping books and personal belongings- P-FDG
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$5,000

Mireshghi, Elham

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Irvine, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2011
Project Title: 
U. of California, Irvine, CA, Mireshghi, Elham, PI - To aid research on 'Regulating the Kidney Market: An Ethnographic Investigation of the 'Iranian Model' for Paid Unrelated Kidney Donation,' supervised by Dr. Michael Montoya

ELHAM MIRESHGHI, then a student at University of California, Irvine, California, received funding in April 2011 to aid research on 'Regulating the Kidney Market: An Ethnographic Investigation of the 'Iranian Model' for Paid Unrelated Kidney Donation,' supervised by Dr. Michael Montoya. This research investigates the 'Iranian Model for Paid Non-related Kidney Donation,' the world's only religiously sanctioned and bureaucratically routinized policy for kidney sales. This project is about how despite broad moral uncertainty the policy has been developed and made to endure for over fifteen years. The results build on ethnographic research in hospitals and the Kidney Patient Foundation (KPF) that developed and implements the policy, as well as a diachronic analysis of the making of the policy, including interviews of kidney donors and patients, policy-makers, patient advocates, bureaucrats, urologists - and Shi'a jurists that have decreed permissive fatwas on organ sales. The first phase of this project consisted of extensive observation and interviewing at the KPF. By following the bureaucratic dynamics, the managerial tactics, and the movement (and stasis) of knowledge within the organization, it reveals the everyday processes that help kidney selling endure, despite the policy's conflict with the moral sensibilities of the many people involved. Furthermore, by ethnographically documenting encounters between kidney sellers, recipients, and staff, it reveals the ways in which each of these actors constructs an evolving fragmented ethics on kidney selling.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$10,595

Enfield, Nicholas James

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Max Planck Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant