Ruby, Jay

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 31, 2010
Project Title: 
Ruby, Dr. Jay, Temple U., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - To aid preparation of the Jay Ruby Visual Anthropology Papers for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, Maryland
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$5,500

Brown, Clayton D.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pittsburgh, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 31, 2006
Project Title: 
Brown, Clayton D., U. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA - To aid oral-history interviews with eight Chinese ethnologists and archaeologists on 'Defining the Self.'
Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$4,915

Tribhuvan University

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Tribhuvan U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 2, 2009
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal - Institutional Development Grant

Through a collaboration with Cornell University, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tribhuvan University aims to bring improve the theoretical and methodological training of Ph.D students and upgrade the credentials of current faculty who do not hold a Ph.D. The IDG grant will be used to upgrade the current curriculum, provide modest support for research, intensify international exposure and exchange and build up the library and electronic resources. Currently in Nepal, the research agenda in anthropology is frequently determined by NGOs and development agencies where many of the students and faculty gain their experience. The IDG will allow more freedom for the department itself to determine its academic concerns. A primary aim is to significantly improve the theoretical and methodological capacity of the anthropology department as apposed to applied/development anthropology, thereby allowing the department to be competitive and contribute internationally.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Friedlander, Eva

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
May 14, 2013
Project Title: 
Friedlander, Dr. Eva, New York, NY - To aid preparation of the personal papers and research materials of Dr. Owen Lynch for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Zimman, Lal

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Colorado, Boulder, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 13, 2010
Project Title: 
Zimman, Lal, U. of Colorado, Boulder, CO - To aid research on 'Talking like a Man: Identity, Socialization, Biology, and the Gendered Voice among Female-to-Male Transsexuals,' supervised by Dr. Kira Hall

LAL ZIMMAN, then a student at University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, received a grant in October 2010 to aid research on 'Talking like a Man: Identity, Socialization, Biology, and the Gendered Voice among Female-to-Male Transsexuals,' supervised by Dr. Kira Hall. As a window into the relationship between gender and the voice, this study combines methods from linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics to analyze the changing voices of female-to-male transgender people. Fifteen trans men and others on the female-to-male identity spectrum were recorded in a variety of contexts during their first 1-2 years of hormone therapy. Testosterone, which is one of the most popular medical interventions among trans men, can spur dramatic changes in the larynx along with other so-called 'secondary' sex characteristics. By tracking changes in pitch as well as speaking style, this study underscores the intertwined nature of embodiment, socialization, and identity work, which may or may not be aligned in predictable ways. Trans men, who were raised in a female gender role but do not see themselves as women, clearly represent atypical combinations of physiology, early life socialization, and self-defined gender identity. With the marked biological changes that testosterone brings about, these trans speakers also demonstrate the diversity of speaking styles that can be perceived as male-sounding. Ultimately this study shed lights on the inextricable relationship between the body and social practice while simultaneously problematizing the notion that voices can be unproblematically categorized as 'female' or 'male.'

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$19,950

Hewlett, Christopher Erik

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
St. Andrews, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 21, 2015
Project Title: 
Hewlett, Dr. Christopher E., Charlottesville, VA - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Joanna Overing for archival deposit with the University Library at the University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$6,930

Kramer, Elise Ann

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2010
Project Title: 
Kramer, Elise Ann, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Mutual Minorityhood: The Rhetoric of Victimhood in the American Free Speech/Political Correctness Debate,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal

ELISE A. KRAMER, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, was awarded funding in May 2010 to aid research on 'Mutual Minorityhood: The Rhetoric of Victimhood in the American Free Speech/Political Correctness Debate,' supervised by Dr. Susan Gal. It is a curious feature of contemporary American political debates that they tend to shade into arguments about censorship and freedom of speech. Moreover, these arguments often fit into a well-trod metapragmatic cycle: 'You're censoring me!' 'No, I'm not, and by saying I'm censoring you, you're censoring me.' Freedom of speech is simultaneously everywhere and nowhere. The dissertation attempts to make sense of this apparent paradox by arguing that seemingly specific and localized arguments about censorship and silencing are actually one of the central organizing tools for a wide range of folk ideologies about power, language, representation, identity, and the shape of the social landscape. The project is based on nine months of ethnographic fieldwork at a state American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) affiliate in the Bible Belt, supplemented by interviews with high-level staff at various political nonprofits in Washington, DC. Through the analysis of the language that these activists used in political and apolitical interactions, the dissertation unpacks the extraordinarily complex notion of 'censorship' in the modern multicultural state and demonstrates that its stakes are not only far-reaching but central to American political life.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$18,820

McShane, Patrice McCrann

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2010
Project Title: 
McShane, Patrice McCrann, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Ethnic Insult as Conflict Prevention in Burkina Faso,' supervised by Dr. Judith T. Irvine

Preliminary abstract: In this dissertation project, I will explore cultural beliefs about dakire, the exchange of ethnic insults in Burkina Faso. Dakire is highly theorized by Burkinabè people, who attribute many societal boons to it: the facilitation of candor in a deferential society; the minimization of inter-ethnic power differential; the catharsis of ethnic tension. Many Burkinabè people believe that dakire is key to the smooth functioning of society, and that it serves to prevent violence between ethnic groups. For these reasons, dakire is a point of local pride and salience. I suggest that ethnic jokers ideologically and semiotically reify concepts of 'ethnicity' and 'nation,' through interactional, linguistic practice. I will examine how different political movements have influenced modern beliefs about dakire. Although dakire has existed in Burkina since pre-colonial times, I hypothesize that its heightened salience is a new phenomenon. Dakire, in its modern conception, serves to unite ethnic groups into a network delineated by national boundaries, making it an attractive nation-building tool for the Burkinabè state. I also explore how dakire is motivated by an iconic relationship to kinship-based joking. This metaphorical extension of familial behavioral norms onto inter-ethnic behavioral norms reinforces the 'naturalness' of modern ethnic categories and inter-ethnic affiliation.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$17,570

Salazar, Noel B.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Royal Anthropological Institute
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
January 28, 2015
Project Title: 
Salazar, Dr. Noel B., U. of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium - To prepare the complete correspondence and papers of the EASA Executive Committee for archival deposit with the Royal Anthropological Institute - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$17,500

Carandell, Miquel

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Institut Catala de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolucion Social (IPHES)
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
February 2, 2015
Project Title: 
Carandell Baruzzi, Miquel, Barcelona, Spain - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Josep Gibert i Clos for archival deposit with the Institut Catrala de Paleontologia, Barcelona, Spain
Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$14,620