Lindstrom, Lamont

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Tulsa, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 3, 2010
Project Title: 
Lindstrom, Dr. Lamont, U. o f Tulsa, Tulsa, OK - To aid research on 'Resilient Lives: Postcolonial Personhood in Vanuatu'

DR. LAMONT LINDSTROM, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma, was awarded funding in May 2010 to aid research on 'Resilient Lives: Postcolonial Personhood in Vanuatu.' Significant rural-urban migration has characterized the postcolonial Melanesian states including Vanuatu. Over the past 30 years, most people who once lived in Samaria village (Tanna island) have moved to squatter settlements that ring Port Vila, Vanuatu's capital town. Life history interviews (in SE Tanna Nife/Kwamera language) with thirteen migrants now living in Port Vila's Blacksands and Ohlen neighborhoods, and also with seven villagers remaining back on Tanna, were digitally recorded during July-September 2010. These life histories of island friends first encountered in 1978, now being analyzed, inform developing anthropological theory of Melanesian personhood -- notably that the traditional person was 'dividual' and 'partible'-- especially as local notions of persons have transformed in response to postcolonial life experience. They also document peoples' participation in urban migration, wage-labor, mobile telephony and other new media, religious organization, urban leadership and dispute settlement, and other aspects of urban life and how this participation shapes developing Melanesian sociability and culture.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$7,851

Hatfield, Donald John Williard

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Berklee College of Music
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Hatfield, Dr. Donald John Willard, Berklee College of Music, Boston, MA - To aid research on 'Far Ocean Fishing and Ironies of Indigenous Placemaking in Coastal Taiwan'

Preliminary abstract: In the late 1970s and early 1980s groups of Taiwanese indigenous men enlisted in the island country's far ocean fishing fleet. The work, although dangerous, was lucrative; and the three to five year stints brought the men, mostly of the coastal 'Amis group, to ports of call in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and East Africa. Accidental cosmopolitans whose ventures financed competitive house building in their home villages, these men form a cultural cohort whose experiences contrast with and at times unsettle dominant narratives of indigeneity. For far ocean fishermen, houses brought together personal desires to achieve greater control in relation to their wives' families, notions of development and modernity promoted by the government, consumption of new cultural products, and commitments to their home places. How did these different motivations cohere? And how did the cosmopolitan orientation of these men and their families connect with the emergence, during the same period, of an indigenous rights movement? By looking at houses, music, and other materials in which far ocean fishermen and their communities have commemorated the trade, this project examines relationships between contrasting ways of being indigenous, adding to our understanding of place and personhood.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$4,750

VanValkenburgh, Nathaniel Parker

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2012
Project Title: 
VanValkenburgh, Dr. Nathaniel Parker, Harvard U., Cambridge, MA - To aid research on 'Reducción and Policía: Spanish Colonial Forced Resettlement and Daily Praxis at Carrizales (Zaña Valley, Peru)'

DR. NATHANIEL VanVALKENBURGH, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, was awarded funding in April 2012 to aid research on 'Reducción and Policía: Spanish Colonial Forced Resettlement and Daily Praxis at Carrizales (Zaña Valley, Peru)'. During this course of research, the grantee and collaborators examined the impacts of the Spanish colonial reducción movement on the daily lives of indigenous populations in Peru's lower Zaña valley. 'Reducción' was a wholesale attempt to refashion indigenous subjects by forcibly resettling them into gridded -­ planned towns and reassembling extended native households into nuclear family units. Through excavations at the sites of Carrizales (a reducción abandoned a few years after its foundation in 1572 CE) and Conjunto 125 (an adjacent late prehispanic site), the team household spatial organization and foodways, with the goal of understanding how reduccion's grand aims were articulated and contested within quotidian spaces. Following an excavation field season in 2012, laboratory research in 2013 concentrated on the analysis of zooarchaeological and archaeobotanical remains. Architectural comparisons revealed broad similarities in the organization of domestic space before and after reducción, even as settlement took on a radically different shape. Analysis of malacological and vertebrate assemblages demonstrated a drastic drop in marine species diversity between late prehispanic and early colonial times and a reorientation towards less time -­ intensive fishing and mollusk -­ gathering strategies. Across the same time period, terrestrial species presence and diversity increased markedly, and the residents of Carrizales intensified their production of products that tribute records indicate they owed their encomendero. Based on these results, the grantee and collaborators have secured additional funding and will continue to expand their results in future field sessions.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$24,750

Diel, Lori Boornazian

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas Christian U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Diel, Dr. Lori Boornazian, Texas Christian U., Fort Worth, TX - To aid research on 'Manuscrito del Aperreamiento / Manuscript of a Dogging: Negotiating Power in Early Colonial Cholula'

DR. LORI B. DIEL, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Manuscrito del Aperreamiento/Manuscript of a Dogging: Negotiating Power in Early Colonial Cholula.' The Manuscrito del Aperreamiento (Manuscript of a Dogging), from mid-sixteenth century Mexico, shows an indigenous priest of Cholula being killed by a dog controlled by a Spaniard. Research was undertaken at the Archivo General de Indias, Seville, and the Bibliothèque National de France, Paris, to establish this painting's context of creation and use. Research focused on Cristobal de Tapia's claim that the Cholula encomienda was unfairly taken from his father. Witness testimony against Cristobal correlated with the Manuscrito. Witnesses stated that Hernán Cortés took Cholula away from Andrés de Tapia because of his poor treatment of his indigenous charges, specifically he ordered the dog attack of some indigenous nobles of Cholula and the hangings of others. The Manuscrito was not submitted as evidence in this court case and was likely maintained by Cholula because of its documentary and commemorative value. An examination of the original painting revealed its high value and suggests that it was copied from an earlier original. Though the Manuscrito's meaning appears simple on the surface, it was much more complex, acting as both memorial and legal record of the killing of these religious and political leaders of Cholula and evidence against the Spaniards responsible.

Publication Credit:

Diel, Lori. Boomazian 2011. Manuscrito del Aperramiento (Manuscript of the Dogging): A 'Dogging' and Its Implications for Early Colonial Cholula. Ethnohistory 58(4):585-611.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$9,256

Semaw, Sileshi

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Stone Age Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 20, 2009
Project Title: 
Semaw, Dr. Sileshi, Stone Age Institute, Gosport, IN - To aid the 'Gona Palaeoanthropological Research Project'

DR. SILESHI SEMAW, Stone Age Institute, Gosport, Indiana, was awarded funding in November 2009, to aid the 'Gona Palaeoanthropological Research Project.' The Gona Palaeoanthropological Research Project, Afar, Ethiopia, is known for yielding a large number of stone artifacts and associated fragmentary fossil bones dated to 2.6 Ma, which are the oldest well documented archaeological materials in the world. In part funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Gona archaeology team continued fieldwork in 2010 and discovered stone artifacts with extraordinary information from newly opened excavations at the site of OGS-7 (in the Ounda Gona South area). The newly excavated stone artifacts include the first hammerstone to ever be found with the earliest archaeological materials dated to 2.6 Ma, more than a dozen cores (some radially-worked), a pick-like core, a large number of débitage (including whole flakes and angular fragments) and associated fragmentary fossil bones. The stone artifacts were recovered within fine-grained sediments and their condition was very fresh. Further, the Gona archaeology team conducted extended systematic surveys in the older deposits dated between 2.6-3.0 Ma to document the presence of any stones/bones modified as a result of hominid activities. The team collected several fossil fauna, but no modified stones/bones were encountered in these deposits. Based on the abundance of archaeological sites documented at 2.6 Ma at Gona and the superior knapping skills shown on the techniques of the manufacture of these artifacts, it is possible that the beginnings of the use of flaked stones may go back further in time, probably as early as 2.9 Ma. The last fossil evidence for Australopithecus afarensis is dated to 2.9 Ma, and it is likely that a new hominid species that evolved after the demise of A. afarensis could have begun manipulating stones, eventually discovering sharp cutting tools from stones probably used for activities related to animal butchery. Recently the Dikika Project (located south of the Gona study area) announced 3.4 Ma fossil bones that the team claims to have been intentionally modified by A. afarensis. However, this claim cannot be scientifically substantiated because it was based on two surface collected bones with no geological context, and with no evidence of a single stone artifact to back it up. In addition, the cutmark evidence from Dikika was challenged, and a number of experts in taphonomy believe that the modifications exhibited on the bones represent evidence that is typical of trampling. Therefore, currently Gona is the only site that has yielded scientifically proven stone artifacts and fossil bones that are the oldest documented in the world.

Publication credit:

Simpson, S.W., L. Kleinsasser, J. Guade, N.E. Levin, W.C. McIntosh, N. Dunbar, S. Semaw, M.J. Rogers. 2015. Late Miocene Hominin Teetch from the Gona Paleoanthropological Research Project Area,
Afar, Ethiopia. Journal of Human Evolution 81:68-82

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Blokland, Talja V.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Amsterdam, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 4, 2001
Project Title: 
Blokland, Dr. Talja, U. of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands - To aid research on 'Does the Urban Gentry Help? A Comparative Study of Daily Life in 'Mixed' Neighborhoods'

DR. TALJA BLOKLAND, of the University of Amsterdam in Amsterdam, Netherlands, received an award in December 2001 to aid ethnographic research on the effects of gentrification on daily life in 'mixed' neighborhoods in urban Amsterdam. Conducted between January 2002 and November 2004, the project was focused on the question, How do residents in a low-income housing project experience the gentrification of immediately adjacent parts of their neighborhood? Data collection consisted of recording life histories, which revealed the confluence of personal life, neighborhood characteristics, changes in the urban environment, and the construction of race and class through symbolic geographies of place. Blokland found that class and race were constructed through everyday life histories and in turn affected people's retrospective constructions of neighborhood histories. Ethnographic thick description showed how project residents and gentrifiers overcame barriers of race and class in their attempts to get things done for the neighborhood but also how, in the very practices in which people worked together, social distances of race and class were constructed, reinforced, and rarely challenged. Blokland also demonstrated how residents' development of strong social identifications was limited, both inside and outside the housing project. Inside the project, distrust and especially the ambivalence of mistrust characterized everyday interactions, whereas outside the projects, especially in interactions with representatives of institutions, both parties discursively constructed social distances.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$19,500

Panagopoulou, Eleni

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Ephory of Paleoanthropology-Speleology
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2006
Project Title: 
Panagopoulou, Dr. Eleni, Ephoreia Palaeoanthropology-Speleology, Athens, Greece - To aid research on 'Late Pleistocene of the Mani Peninsula, Southern Greece: Paleoanthropological Investigation'

DR. ELENI PANAGOPOULOU, Ephoreia Palaeoanthropology-Speleology, Athens, Greece, was awarded a grant in April 2006 to aid research on 'Late Pleistocene of the Mani Peninsula, Southern Greece: Paleoanthropological Investigation.' Although Greece is located at a geographic crossroads, its palaeoanthropological record has remained little explored due to the lack of systematic research. Excavations at the recently discovered cave complex of Lakonis in southern Greece have provided crucial evidence to the Neanderthal-Modem debate and the palaeoanthropology of the Eastern Mediterranean. The site preserves an extensive record of human use from ca. 120-20000 years ago and Neanderthal fossil material dated to 43 ka, a time period during which Neanderthals and Modems coexisted and probably interacted in parts of Europe. Excavation and multidisciplinary research at the site since 1999 have concentrated on establishing the length and nature of occupation of the cave complex, examining the site's role in its local and regional contexts, and discovering other Pleistocene sites in the area. Several lines of evidence indicate that Lakonis has functioned as a multiple activity site visited regularly during most of the Late Pleistocene. Furthermore, as suggested by other palaeo lithic findspots discovered in the context of the project, the peninsula where the site is located probably functioned as a refuge area in colder intervals of the last glaciation. Excavations in 2006 have focused on elucidating issues of stratigraphy and site formation processes, enriching the fossil and archaeological sample of the Middle-Upper Palaeo lithic transitional layers and on exploring the relationship between discrete occupational episodes and environmental fluctuations. It was also discovered that the cave complex includes several collapsed formations with cultural material perhaps earlier than 120,000 years ago.

Publication Credits:

Panagopoulou, Eleni. 2008 Brief Communication: Dental Development and Enamel Thickness in the Lakonis Neanderthal Molar. American Journal of Physical Anthropology.138:112-118.

Harvati, Katerina, Eleni Panagopoulou, and Curtis Runnels. 2009. The Paleoanthropology of Greece. Evolutionary Anthropology 18(4):131-143.

Smith, T.M., K. Harvati, A.J. Olejniczak, D.J. Reid, J.-J. Hublin, and E. Panagopoulou. 2009. Brief Communication: Dental Development and Enamel Thickness in the Lakonis Neanderthal Molar. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 138(1):112-118.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$24,900

Lyons, Diane Elaine

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Calgary, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 12, 2011
Project Title: 
Lyons, Dr. Diane Elaine, U. of Calgary, Calgary, Canada - To aid research on 'The Yeha Pottery Project'

DR. DIANE E. LYONS, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, was awarded a grant in October 2011 to aid research on 'The Yeha Pottery Project.' Material signatures of marginalized identities of female market potters living near Yeha in central Tigray, northern highland Ethiopia. were investigated. The study builds upon a previous study of market potters in eastern Tigray and provides a regional comparison. In Tigray and other societies across sub-Saharan Africa, different types of artisans are marginalized. The antiquity of these practices is unknown, but such practices are implicated in the construction of social complexity. Ethnoarchaeological field research determined the Yeha area potters' technological style, which is a material identity for each potter community. Comparison of the two studies shows that Tigray's central and eastern potters produce similar pottery types, but they use distinct technological styles. INAA analysis of pottery samples demonstrates distinct chemical signatures for the pottery from the two regions. Technological styles and INAA analyses can be used to track the history and interaction of these potter communities in the ancient past. Both regions express some spatial marginalization of potter communities, and in both contexts potters experience verbal insults, greater poverty than their farmer neighbors, and sometimes violence in clay mining extraction. When potters are compared with more stigmatized blacksmiths, a landscape of socially meaningful places associated with these stigmatizing practices emerges.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Hewamanne, Sandya Kalyani

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
American Institute of Sri Lanka
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2005
Project Title: 
Hewamanne, Dr. Sandya, American Institute of Sri Lankan Studies, Colombo, Sri Lanka - To aid research on ''Wither Free Trade Zone Identities?: How Former Factory Workers Negotiate 'New Lives' in Sri Lankan Villages'

DR. SANDYA HEWAMANNE, American Institute of Sri Lankan Studies, Colombo, Sri Lanka, was awarded a grant in May 2005 to aid research on 'Wither Free Trade Zone (FTZ) Identities? How Former Factory Workers Negotiate 'New Lives' in Sri Lankan Villages.' Research was conducted from July 2005 to April 2006 to study how former FTZ workers negotiate their lives once back in their villages with the new sense of self and feminist and political consciousness they acquired within the FTZ. Data was obtained by visiting former workers' village homes and collecting narratives of their lives as prospective brides, new wives and mothers in these villages and interviewing their relatives, in-laws and neighbors. The data provided the basis for further research on the practices of transnational feminist networks to see whether there is space for former workers to engage in feminist political activities on their own terms. Overall, the research demonstrated that while they are forced to linguistically and performatively suppress the new selves created in the FTZ, the same oppositional consciousness and new knowledges helped former workers to network with urban contacts and participate in the social and political spaces of their villages. In short, the research evidenced that FTZ employment is not just a transitional phase for village women but a meaningful interlude that has a long-term impact on the way they negotiate power relations. Results were disseminated through several peer-reviewed journal articles and a chapter in a book.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$23,600

Waweru, Veronica Njoki

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Stony Brook, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 13, 2009
Project Title: 
Waweru, Dr. Veronica Njoki, Stony Brook U., Stony Brook, NY - To aid research on 'Chronology of Holocene Innovations and Inventions in West Turkana, Kenya'

DR. VERONICA N. WAWERU, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, was awarded a grant in October 2009 to aid research on 'Chronology of Holocene Innovations and Inventions in West Turkana, Kenya.' Chronology data from this research provide better resolution for dates of innovations in West Turkana between 8.2ka and 0.87ka. The Holocene marks the introduction of domestic fauna in a region that until ~5ka relied on a hunting/gathering/fishing subsistence base. A combination of Thermoluminescence (TL) and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) methods were used to refine the timeline for innovations at different paleo-habitats in West Turkana. The study confirms existing dates for the large fishing village of Lothagam and also yields older dates for the Later Holocene lacustrine sites of Lopoy and Napedet than previously known. Aggregate data from the Holocene in the Turkana Basin is uninformative about whether local hunter/fishers adopted pastoralism or if demic movements brought the new socio-economic package of domesticate fauna and pillar-building. Chronology data from this research and that of other scientists in the last 40 years point to the existence of a mixed strategy involving hunting, fishing, and use of small domestic stock up to the very late Holocene. Niche partitioning may explain the existence of multiple economic strategies where different social groups pursued varied subsistence strategies while maintaining exchange relations involving ceramics and domestic stock. Future research will seek to answer this question.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$16,360
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