Zlolniski, Christian

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Grant Year
2008

DR. CHRISTIAN ZLOLNISKI, University of Texas, Arlington, Texas, received funding in April 2008 to conduct research in the San Quintin Valley in Baja California, Mexico. His study examines how the growth of the export-oriented fresh-produce industry has affected the employment opportunities and labor migration patterns of indigenous farm laborers who come from southern Mexico. He conducted participant observation and household interviews with Mixtec, Triqui, and Zapotec workers and families.

Zipkin, Andrew Michael

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Grant Year
2016

Preliminary abstract: Communicating information and identity with symbols is an essential attribute of our species. Humans have used ochre pigments for symbolic expression for hundreds of thousands of years. However, rock art and other practices involving iron-based pigments are understudied in the modern era. Research on this rapidly vanishing form of cultural heritage is thus critical to understanding the origins of symbolism. This project bridges archaeology, ethnography, and geochemistry to investigate ochre use in Stone Age and present day Kenya.

Zhao, Jianhua

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Grant Year
2011

DR. JIANHUA ZHAO, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentuckey, was awarded funding in April 2011 to aid resaerch on 'Making China's Second Generation Family Business Owners.' This research is an ethnographic study of the processes through which second generation family business owners are constituted in China. It investigates the formation of a particular group of capitalist subjects in the political-economic context of contemporary China.

Zeder, Melinda A.

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Grant Year
2012

DR. MELINDA ZEDER, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, was awarded funding in October 2012 to aid research on 'First Steps toward Animal Domestication in the Taurus/Zagros Arc.' Combined archaeological and genetic information have confirmed that at least three of the four major Near Eastern livestock species-sheep, goats, and pigs-had been domesticated in this region by 10,500 years.

Yanagisako, Sylvia Junko

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Grant Year
2006

DR. SYLVIA YANAGISAKO, Stanford University, Stanford, California, was awarded a grant in April 2006 to aid research on 'Made in Translation: Italian Family Firms in China.' Ethnographic research on Italian family firms pursuing transnational business ventures in textile and clothing production in China shows that their transnational business projects are incited and shaped by kinship sentiments and commitments. Commitments to family firm continuity and intergenerational succession spur projects of transnational investment, expansion, and diversification and shape management strategies.

Yan, Yunxiang

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Grant Year
2002

DR. YUNXIANG YAN, of the University of California in Los Angeles, California, received funding in May 2002 to aid research on McDonald's restaurants in Beijing, China. Through an ethnographic account of the consumption of McDonald's food and associated cultural symbols, Yan examined local transformations of Americana and the sociocultural effects of global capitalism in Beijing, engaging in current anthropological debates over transnationalism and cultural globalization. Fieldwork was carried out between September 2003 and February 2004 in Beijing and Shanghai.

Wright, Patricia C.

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Grant Year
2001

DR. PATRICIA C. WRIGHT, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York, was awarded funding in January 2001 to aid research on 'The Effects of Old Age on the Behavior of Sifakas in Madagascar Rain Forests.' The goal of this project was to assess the effects of aging on various morphological, demographic, and behavioral aspects of the sifaka, Propithecus diadema edwardsi.

Wright, Lori Ellen

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Grant Year
2001

DR. LORI E. WRIGHT, of Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, was awarded a grant in May 2001 to aid research on dietary inequality at the ancient Maya city of Tikal, Guatemala. Wright tested the hypothesis that the diets of both children and adults at Tikal were more strictly partitioned among social groups during the Late Classic period than during the Early Classic period. This was accomplished through stable isotopic analysis of tooth enamel and bone samples from human skeletons. Dietary signatures were compared with mortuary indicators of social status.

Woolard, Kathryn Ann

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Grant Year
2006

DR. KATHRYN A. WOOLARD, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, received a grant in October 2006 to aid research on 'A Longitudinal Study of Language Ideology, Policy, and Practices in Bilingual Barcelona.' Language ideology and practice in Barcelona, Spain, were examined in comparison to research in 1979-80 and 1987. Sociolinguistic changes were assessed along three dimensions of the relation between Catalan and Castilian.