Kideckel, David A.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Central Connecticut State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Kideckel, Dr. D., Central CT St. U., New Britain, CT; and Mihailescu, Dr. Vintila, Nat'l School for Political & Admin. Studies, Bucuresti, Romania - To aid collaborative research on 'Citizenship & Changing Political Identity In Two Globalizing Societies'
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$34,950

Pavlov, Pavel

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Institute of Language, Literature, and History
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 25, 2004
Project Title: 
Pavlov, Dr. Pavel, Institute of Language, Literature & History, Syktyvkar, Russia; and Roebroeks, Dr. Wil, U. Leiden, The Netherlands - To aid collaborative research on the colonization of the northern world
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$29,600

Smith, Lindsay Adams

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New Mexico, Albuquerque, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 23, 2014
Project Title: 
Smith, Dr. Lindsay, U. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; and Garcia Deister, Dr. Vivette, U. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City - To aid collaborative research on 'Migrant DNA: The Science Of Disappearance And Death Across The Mexican Borderlands'

Preliminary abstract: Forensic DNA is an ever-growing scientific and political regime in spaces of violence, dispossession, and death. This Project, working in the Mexican borderlands, from Guatemala to the United States, will examine the emergence and consolidation of forensic genetics at the intersection of state-based and grass-roots responses to migration and migrant death. Focusing on scientists, we seek to elucidate the knowledge practices that shape death and identification, particularly the way that genetics has emerged as a contested paradigm for making sense of the crisis of migration and human rights. Drawing on the anthropology of science, critical forensic anthropology, and migrant studies, this study explores the epistemology of forensic genetics in this border region. We seek to elucidate the role of genetics within a new politics of life and death, one where the dead body, made legible through the molecular gaze becomes a contested space for narrating the suffering of violence. This ethnography of forensic science in Mexico adds a new dimension to the theorization of the border, bringing critical attention to the role of forensic science as a knowledge-making borderland straddling justice and research, humanitarian identification and state obfuscation, and the consolidation and contestation of Mexican state power. By focusing on migrant DNA an integral component of the production of violence, justice, and belonging in the global economy, we propose a new methodology for a multi-disciplinary anthropology of science that moves out of the laboratory to better understand the epistemologies and violences of truth-making in the borderlands.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$34,820

Blumenschine, Robert John

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rutgers U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2006
Project Title: 
Blumenschine, Dr. Robert J., Rutgers U., New Brunswick, NJ; and Maso, Dr. Fidelis T., Open U., Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - To aid collaborative research on 'Oldowan Hominin Land Use in the Post-Volcanic Lowermost Bed II Eastern Olduvai Basin, Tanzania'

Publication credit:

Blumenschine, Robert J., Ian G. Stanistreet, Jackson K. Njau, et al. 2012. Environments and Hominin Activities across the FLK Peninsula during Zinjanthropus Times (1.84 Ma), Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. Journal of Human Evolution 63(2)364-383.

Blumenschine, Robert J., Fidelis T. Masao, Harald Stollhofen, Ian G. Stanistreet, et al. 2012. Landscape Distribution of Oldowan Stone Artifact Assemblages across the Fault Compartments of the Eastern Olduvai Lake Basin during Early Lowermost Bed II Times. Journal of Human Evolution 63(2):384-394.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$29,993

Di Fiore, Anthony Francis

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 10, 2005
Project Title: 
Di Fiore, Dr. Anthony, New York U., New York, NY; and Dr. Eduardo Fernandez-Duque, Formosa, Argentina - To aid collaborative research on comparative socioecology of monogamous neotropical primates in the Ecuadorian Amazon and the Argentinian Chaco
Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$30,000

Harb, Mona

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
American U. of Beirut
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 19, 2007
Project Title: 
Harb, Mona, American U. of Beirut, Lebanon and Deeb, Lara, U. of CA, Irvine- To aid collaborative research on 'Faith and Fun: Pious Entertainment in Shi'i South Beirut'
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$32,350

Klarich, Elizabeth A.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 22, 2008
Project Title: 
Klarich, Dr. Elizabeth A., Cotsen Inst (UCLA), Santa Monica, CA; and Flores Blanco, Luis A., Puno, Peru - To aid collaborative research on 'Evaluating Early Urbanism at Pukara, Peru'

Preliminary abstract: Funding is requested to support a collaborative archaeological research project in the Lake Titicaca Basin of Peru that includes (1) a field project at the site of Pukara, Department of Puno, and (2) a training component for Peruvian undergraduate students focused on local site museum development. First, the field project consists of two months of mapping and excavations within two major areas at the site--the central district and the site periphery--to evaluate models for why and how Pukara developed into the first regional center in the northern Lake Titicaca Basin during the Late Formative Period (500 BC- AD 400). The mapping and excavations will be co-directed by the ICRG co-applicants, Elizabeth Klarich and Luis Angel Flores Blanco, Andean archaeologists with distinct perspectives based on their regional field experience, academic training, and specific research interests. After the conclusion of the field project, recovered materials will be inventoried, analyzed, and curated. The co-applicants will work jointly in all stages of the field project, including publication of findings in both Spanish and English. Secondly, the proposed training component provides an opportunity for four undergraduate students to develop a permanent exhibit documenting prehistoric and modern pottery production within the Museo LĂ­tico Pukara.

Publication Credit:

Klarich, Elizabeth. 2014. Crafting, Community, and Collaboration: Reflections on the Ethnographic Sala Project at the Pukara Lithic Museum, Peru. Museum Anthropology 37(2):118-132

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$34,655

Pavlov, Pavel

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Institute of Language, Literature, and History
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 28, 2002
Project Title: 
Pavlov, Dr. Pavel, Institute of Language, Literature & History, Syktyvkar, Russia; and Roebroeks, Dr. Wil, U. Leiden, The Netherlands - To aid collaborative research on the colonization of the northern world
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$30,000

Taylor, Tonya N.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 3, 2009
Project Title: 
Taylor, Dr. Tonya, Columbia U., New York, NY; & Chibanda, Dr. Dickson, U. of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe - To aid collaborative research on 'Cultural Conceptions of Depression Among Traditional Healers and People Living with HIV/AIDS in Harare, Zimbabwe'

Preliminary abstract: Zimbabwe has one of the most severe AIDS epidemics in the world, with an estimated 1 out of 7 people living with HIV. Since the late 1990s, the country's epidemic has been exacerbated by an acute politic-economic crisis that has also heightened levels of depression. Given that depressed patients seek treatment for traditional healers more than primary care facilities, it is important to understand how cultural beliefs about depression: impact the way individuals respond to symptoms; inform individual decisions to seek care; and affect the manner in which people present their problems. Building on previous research, this proposed study seeks to explore how HIV+ patients and traditional healers in Zimbabwe conceptualize depressive symptoms and how these understandings influence subsequent treatment-seeking behavior and healing processes. Specifically, we will: 1) examine the ways that culture affects the clinical reality of depression, which include subjective experiences, idioms of distress, diagnoses, treatments, and outcomes; and 2) explore how differences in depression with HIV affect engagement with and adherence to HIV care. An understanding of how cultural beliefs of depression impact subjective meanings of experience and subsequent treatment-seeking behaviors may provide insight into how to improve psychosocial support for people with HIV in Zimbabwe.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$26,517

Blumenschine, Robert John

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rutgers U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Blumenschine, Dr. Robert J., Rutgers U., New Brunswick, NJ; and Masao, Dr. Fidelis T., U. of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - To aid collaborative research on 'Predation Risk And Oldowan Hominin Land Use At Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania'

Publication credit:

Blumenschine, Robert J., Ian G. Stanistreet, Jackson K. Njau, et al. 2012. Environments and Hominin Activities across the FLK Peninsula during Zinjanthropus Times (1.84 Ma), Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. Journal of Human Evolution 63(2)364-383.

Blumenschine, Robert J., Fidelis T. Masao, Harald Stollhofen, Ian G. Stanistreet, et al. 2012. Landscape Distribution of Oldowan Stone Artifact Assemblages across the Fault Compartments of the Eastern Olduvai Lake Basin during Early Lowermost Bed II Times. Journal of Human Evolution 63(2):384-394.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$34,980