Paris, Elizabeth H.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
St. Lawrence U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 4, 2014
Project Title: 
Paris, Dr. Elizabeth, St. Lawrence U., Canton, NY; & Lopez Bravo, Dr. Roberto, U. de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas, Mexico - To aid collaborative research on "Households And Communities In Small Polity Networks: Inter-Polity Interaction In Highland Chiapas"

Preliminary abstract: This project will investigate changing patterns of socioeconomic interaction and integration between two neighboring polity centers in the Jovel Valley of highland Chiapas from the Late Classic period (AD 700-900) to Early Postclassic period (AD 900-1250). Our research will explore the degree to which the residents of these sites exchanged goods and information across polity boundaries and the ways the polities may have been interdependent and integrated through socioeconomic networks.

Grant Year: 
2014

Hale, Charles R.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, Austin, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 4, 2014
Project Title: 
Hale, Dr. Charles, U. of Texas, Austin, TX; and Velasquez Nimatuj, Dr. Irma, Independent scholar, Guatemala - To aid collaborative research on "When Rights Ring Hollow: Racism and Anti-racist Horizons in the Americas"

Preliminary abstract: This proposal supports two research teams (in Guatemala and Brazil) that form part of a six-country study of indigenous and afro-descendant peoples, as they confront challenges rooted in ongoing social inequality, racial discrimination and limits to participation in their respective national political systems.  The research emerges from three year's work with organizations in all six countries, which belong to a hemispheric network of "observatories on racism."  Periodic meetings of this network yielded a central empirical observation: throughout the region,

Grant Year: 
2014

Bruner, Emiliano

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National Research Center on Human Evolution (CENIEH)
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 4, 2014
Project Title: 
Bruner, Dr. Emiliano, National Research Center for Human Evolution, Burgos, Spain; and Veleminsky, Dr. Petr, National Museum, Prague, Czech Republic - To aid collaborative research on "Cranial Anatomy, Anthropology, and Vascular System"

Preliminary abstract: The skull has four main vascular systems, largely involved in brain and endocranial blood management. Two of them run directly within or above the bone layers, and their imprints are visible on cranial remains: the middle meningeal vessels and the diploic system. These traits can be used to study vascular biology in situations in which vessels are no more available: archaeology, paleontology, and forensic anthropology. Many of these traits may have also medical importance, being associated with brain oxygenation and thermoregulation.

Grant Year: 
2014

Biesele, Marguerite A.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, Austin, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 17, 2002
Project Title: 
Biesele, Marguerite A., U. of Texas, Austin, TX; and Dr. Wilfred Haacke, U. of Namibia, Windhoek, Namibia - To aid collaboration on: Voices of the Ju/'Hoan and Other San: The Anthropological Value of Texts from Endangered Languages
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$29,996

Di Fiore, Anthony Francis

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 10, 2005
Project Title: 
Di Fiore, Dr. Anthony, New York U., New York, NY; and Dr. Eduardo Fernandez-Duque, Formosa, Argentina - To aid collaborative research on comparative socioecology of monogamous neotropical primates in the Ecuadorian Amazon and the Argentinian Chaco
Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$30,000

Harris, John William Kendal

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rutgers U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Harris, Dr. John William Kendal, Rutgers U., New Brunswick, NJ; and Mbua, Dr. Emma N., National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya - To aid collaborative research on 'International Collaborative Paleoanthropological Research Project (lcpr), Ileret, Kenya'
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$29,750

Klarich, Elizabeth A.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 22, 2008
Project Title: 
Klarich, Dr. Elizabeth A., Cotsen Inst (UCLA), Santa Monica, CA; and Flores Blanco, Luis A., Puno, Peru - To aid collaborative research on 'Evaluating Early Urbanism at Pukara, Peru'

Preliminary abstract: Funding is requested to support a collaborative archaeological research project in the Lake Titicaca Basin of Peru that includes (1) a field project at the site of Pukara, Department of Puno, and (2) a training component for Peruvian undergraduate students focused on local site museum development. First, the field project consists of two months of mapping and excavations within two major areas at the site--the central district and the site periphery--to evaluate models for why and how Pukara developed into the first regional center in the northern Lake Titicaca Basin during the Late Formative Period (500 BC- AD 400). The mapping and excavations will be co-directed by the ICRG co-applicants, Elizabeth Klarich and Luis Angel Flores Blanco, Andean archaeologists with distinct perspectives based on their regional field experience, academic training, and specific research interests. After the conclusion of the field project, recovered materials will be inventoried, analyzed, and curated. The co-applicants will work jointly in all stages of the field project, including publication of findings in both Spanish and English. Secondly, the proposed training component provides an opportunity for four undergraduate students to develop a permanent exhibit documenting prehistoric and modern pottery production within the Museo LĂ­tico Pukara.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$34,655

Prendergast, Mary Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
St. Louis U. in Madrid
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 3, 2011
Project Title: 
Prendergast, Dr. Mary E., St. Louis U. in Madrid, Madrid, Spain; and Mabulla, Dr. Audax, U .of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - To aid collaborative research on 'Archaeological Investigation of a 'Moving Frontier' of Early Herding in Northern Tanzania'

Preliminary Abstract: This project aims to understand the spread of herding and impacts on foragers in eastern Africa ca. 3000 years ago. Sites with so-called 'Pastoral Neolithic' ceramics, often associated with remains of livestock in Kenya, are found in an area stretching from the Serengeti to the Rift Valley in northern Tanzania. This poorly documented area is usually thought to mark the southern 'boundary' of early pastoralism. The existence and implications of this boundary have not been questioned, and it might be more appropriately thought of as a 'frontier' that may shift, dissolve or solidify depending on the nature of forager-food producer relationships. Thus sites in this area are ideal testing grounds for anthropological theories regarding such contact. We explore the 'moving frontier' of herding through systematic surveys and test excavations in the Manyara and Engaruka basins of the Rift Valley. We aim to: understand how land use varied according to subsistence strategy; refine the local chronology for early herding; examine claims for contact among Rift Valley populations; and elucidate the relationship, if any, between material culture and subsistence. The team includes specialists from Tanzania, Europe and the US who will train Tanzanian students in field methods and materials analyses.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$34,985

Tunstall, Elizabeth D.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Swinburne U. of Technology
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 23, 2014
Project Title: 
Tunstall, Dr. Elizabeth, Swineburne U. of Tech, Melbourne, Australia; & Hang Dr. Hai, China Central Academy of Fine Arts - To aid research on 'Living Blue: Design Anthropology & the Designer's Role in the Shifting Meanings of Indigo in India & China'

Preliminary abstract: This international collaborative research grant proposal outlines a multi-sited project to study the role of designers in the shifting cultural meanings of indigo dyes in contemporary China and India. In the project, four international research partners will conduct two field study trips and two Design Anthropology workshops with students. During each field study trip, the partners will spend four weeks at indigo dyeing and weaving field sites in Uravakonda, Andhra Pradesh and Damadka, Kutch, Gujarat, India (October-November 2014) and in Nantong, Jiangsu Province, China (September-October 2015). Framed by the emerging discipline of Design Anthropology (e.g. how design translates values into experience with which people can directly respond), the purpose of the field research is to evaluate the use of Design Anthropology approaches in India and China. Specifically, the project explores the experiences of those who produce and use indigo dyes, as affected by designers, in order to determine the gap between the values expressed and the people's contemporary lived experiences. The project seeks to use this knowledge to define India and China specific Design Anthropologies.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$34,823

Tuross, Noreen Catherine

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 8, 2010
Project Title: 
Tuross, Dr. Noreen, Harvard U., Cambridge, MA; and Robles Garcia, Dr. Nelly, Instituto Nacional de Anthropologia a Historia, Oaxaca, Mexico- To aid collaborative research on 'The Rock Art between Yagul and Mitla'

Preliminary abstract: Between the monument sites of Mitla and Yagul in Oaxaca some the earliest evidence for human existence in the Americas is preserved. This rugged, elevated terrain has been in use by humans throughout the Holocene for a variety of purposes: habitational, subsistence, economic and artistic. The area is currently nominated by Mexico as a World Heritage Area. This project will provide a focused, detailed technical analysis of the rock art pictographs and petroglyphs in the Valley Oaxaca between the monument sites of Yagul and Mitla. Survey of the area over the past several years by INAH personnel has documented hundreds of rock art locations. Several issues surrounding these human symbols have arisen, and this project will focus on several important aspects of the rock art in the caves of Oaxaca. First, the antiquity of the painted and incised elements is unknown. Guesses range from the Prehispanic Postclassic to the Archaic. Second, the materials used to produce the images are unknown. These two issues are intertwined and the identification of datable materials will inform the production question and direct the investigations into antiquity of the images. There is reason to be optimistic about our ability to date these renderings. The most likely pigment used in the production of the pictographs is the organic and datable dye, cochineal. The project wi