Paris, Elizabeth H.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
St. Lawrence U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 4, 2014
Project Title: 
Paris, Dr. Elizabeth, St. Lawrence U., Canton, NY; & Lopez Bravo, Dr. Roberto, U. de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas, Mexico - To aid collaborative research on "Households And Communities In Small Polity Networks: Inter-Polity Interaction In Highland Chiapas"

Preliminary abstract: This project will investigate changing patterns of socioeconomic interaction and integration between two neighboring polity centers in the Jovel Valley of highland Chiapas from the Late Classic period (AD 700-900) to Early Postclassic period (AD 900-1250). Our research will explore the degree to which the residents of these sites exchanged goods and information across polity boundaries and the ways the polities may have been interdependent and integrated through socioeconomic networks.

Grant Year: 
2014

Hale, Charles R.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, Austin, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 4, 2014
Project Title: 
Hale, Dr. Charles, U. of Texas, Austin, TX; and Velasquez Nimatuj, Dr. Irma, Independent scholar, Guatemala - To aid collaborative research on "When Rights Ring Hollow: Racism and Anti-racist Horizons in the Americas"

Preliminary abstract: This proposal supports two research teams (in Guatemala and Brazil) that form part of a six-country study of indigenous and afro-descendant peoples, as they confront challenges rooted in ongoing social inequality, racial discrimination and limits to participation in their respective national political systems.  The research emerges from three year's work with organizations in all six countries, which belong to a hemispheric network of "observatories on racism."  Periodic meetings of this network yielded a central empirical observation: throughout the region,

Grant Year: 
2014

Bruner, Emiliano

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National Research Center on Human Evolution (CENIEH)
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
November 4, 2014
Project Title: 
Bruner, Dr. Emiliano, National Research Center for Human Evolution, Burgos, Spain; and Veleminsky, Dr. Petr, National Museum, Prague, Czech Republic - To aid collaborative research on "Cranial Anatomy, Anthropology, and Vascular System"

Preliminary abstract: The skull has four main vascular systems, largely involved in brain and endocranial blood management. Two of them run directly within or above the bone layers, and their imprints are visible on cranial remains: the middle meningeal vessels and the diploic system. These traits can be used to study vascular biology in situations in which vessels are no more available: archaeology, paleontology, and forensic anthropology. Many of these traits may have also medical importance, being associated with brain oxygenation and thermoregulation.

Grant Year: 
2014

Smith, Adam Thomas

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 15, 2003
Project Title: 
Smith, Dr. Adam T., U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL; and Dr. Ruben S.Badalyan, Armenian Academy of Sciences, Yerevan, Rep. of Armenia - To aid collaboration on political institutions and social complexity in Late Bronze Age Caucasia
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$28,795

Arzhantseva, Irina Arkadevna

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 10, 2011
Project Title: 
Arzhantseva, Dr. Irina A., Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Moscow, Russia; and Karamanova, Dr. Minsara S., U. of Kyzylorda, Kazakhstan; - To aid research on 'The Origins Of Early Medieval Towns In North-Western Kazakhstan: The Case Of Dzhankent'

Preliminary abstract: This project aims to test hypotheses and provisional ideas about the origins of early medieval towns east of the Aral Sea by a program of archaeological fieldwork at Dzhankent (Kazakhstan). Key questions include the date of the earliest layers of the town, its lay-out, and the structure of its population. These questions will be tackled by targeted excavation within the town, non-destructive prospection of the entire town area and its immediate surroundings, and the excavation of barrows in the vicinity. The results are to be interpreted within the theoretical framework of Central Asian and Western European debates about urban origins and functions in early medieval state formation; these are so far unconnected debates for which this project would provide a first point of contact. The project will be conducted by a team of archaeologists from Kazakh, Russian, British and German institutions with complementary expertise and experience. Location, project design, and a training element involving undergraduate and Ph.D. students are also intended to support the development and institutional foundation of archaeology in western Kazakhstan.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$33,965

Conklin, Beth A.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Vanderbilt U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 27, 2001
Project Title: 
Conklin, Dr. Beth A, Vanderbilt U., Nashville, TN; and Vilaca, Dr. Aparecida, Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - To aid collaborative research on places and bodies as sites of identity among the Wari' of western Brazil
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$30,000

Garcea, Elena Antonella

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cassino, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 18, 2006
Project Title: 
Garcea, Dr. Elena, U. di Cassino, Cassino, Italy; and Dr. Abdulaye Maga, IRSH/UAM, Niamey, Niger - To aid collaborative research on Early and Middle Holocene adaptations across the Sahara-Sahel border

Publication Credit:

Garcea, Elena A.A (ed.) 2013. Gobero: The No-Return Frontier Archaeology and Landscape at the Saharo-Sahelian Borderland. Africa Magna Verlag: Frankfurt, Germany

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$30,000

Keitumetse, Susan Osireditse

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Botswana, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
May 27, 2011
Project Title: 
Keitumetse, Dr. Susan, U. of Botswana, Maun, Botswana; and Crossland, Dr. Zoe, Columbia U. NY, NY - To aid collaborative research on 'Historical Archaeology Of 'Marginal Landscapes' Of East-Central Botswana: Between Kgalagadi Desert & Limpopo Dry Valleys'

Preliminary abstract:
This project looks at archaeological material from the sparsely populated ecotone between the Kalahari desert and the rich subsidiary valleys of the Limpopo river ('marginal spaces'), in order to explore the social and political upheavals of the latter half of the 19th century in Botswana. This was a period characterized by Tswana polities' migrations into present-day Botswana who came across other Tswana and San communities such as Tswana of Bakgalagadi origin in Shoshong town later occupied by BaNgwato polity who had contact with them. Most archaeological work has been directed either towards earlier sites or the royal towns of BaNgwato of the 19th century. Little environmental and social research work has been carried out on what is generally considered as marginal zones, where other communities may have thrived. We propose to carry out surface survey and excavation in a cattle post near Mosolotshane area, along the dry Bonwapitse stream of the Limpopo River Basin (LRB), in order to better understand the changing patterns of landscape inhabitation and social stratification during migration byTswana communities. We will shift focus away from the hilltop settlements (Toutswe) and nucleated towns (e.g. Shoshong, Palatswe, etc), that have been the object of most anthropological research.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$35,000

Nelson, Sarah M.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Denver, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 14, 2001
Project Title: 
Nelson, Dr. Sarah M, U. of Denver, Denver, CO; and Guo, Dashun, Liaoning Province Archaeological Research Instit., Shenyang, China - To aid international collaboration on the archaeological survey of Niuheliang

DR. SARAH M. NELSON, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, and PROF. GUO DASHUN, Liaoning Province Archaeological Research Institute, Shenyang, China, received a renewal of their International Collaborative Research Grant in December 2001 to aid an archaeological survey of Niuheliang site, Liaoning, China. Work at the site of Niuheliang in May and June 2002 centered on an electromagnetic survey (similar to ground-penetrating radar [GPR], but using magnetic fields instead of radar). This non-intrusive technique was used to help understand the raised area with rock walls or edges called the 'Platform' by the Chinese archeologists. This area is on a gentle slope above the 'Nushenmiao' the Goddess Temple, and is important because it must have been related to the ritual activities that are implied by the other discoveries here. An instrument called a GEM was used to produce four different readings for each point on the grid. Analysis of each plot indicated several likely features. The clearest are a large rectangular area which was identified directly north of the Goddess Temple, and a linear feature which may be a road or path, which trends north-northeast through the upper section. The visible rock alignments show up clearly in the grids, but do not mask other features. These anomalies will be probed in consultation with the Chinese crew from the Liaoning Province Archaeological Research Institute.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Smith, Lindsay Adams

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New Mexico, Albuquerque, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 23, 2014
Project Title: 
Smith, Dr. Lindsay, U. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; and Garcia Deister, Dr. Vivette, U. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City - To aid collaborative research on 'Migrant DNA: The Science Of Disappearance And Death Across The Mexican Borderlands'

Preliminary abstract: Forensic DNA is an ever-growing scientific and political regime in spaces of violence, dispossession, and death. This Project, working in the Mexican borderlands, from Guatemala to the United States, will examine the emergence and consolidation of forensic genetics at the intersection of state-based and grass-roots responses to migration and migrant death. Focusing on scientists, we seek to elucidate the knowledge practices that shape death and identification, particularly the way that genetics has emerged as a contested paradigm for making sense of the crisis of migration and human rights. Drawing on the anthropology of science, critical forensic anthropology, and migrant studies, this study explores the epistemology of forensic genetics in this border region. We seek to elucidate the role of genetics within a new politics of life and death, one where the dead body, made legible through the molecular gaze becomes a contested space for narrating the suffering of violence. This ethnography of forensic science in Mexico adds a new dimension to the theorization of the border, bringing critical attention to the role of forensic science as a knowledge-making borderland straddling justice and research, humanitarian identification and state obfuscation, and the consolidation and contestation of Mexican state power. By focusing on migrant DNA an integral component of the production of violence, justice, and belonging in the global economy, we propose a new methodology for a multi-disciplinary anthropology of science that moves out of the laboratory to better understand the epistemologies and violences of truth-making in the borderlands.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$34,820