Kuan, Teresa

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Whittier Colllege
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 6, 2011
Project Title: 
Kuan, Dr. Teresa, Whittier College, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research and writing on 'Adjusting the Bonds of Love: Chinese Governmentalities and Lived Experience in Post-Mao China' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. TERESA KUAN, Whittier College, Los Angeles, California, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2011 to aid research and writing on 'Adjusting the Bonds of Love: Chinese Governmentalities and Lived Experience in Post-Mao China.' China's economic strategy for building a knowledge economy depends on the art of subject-making. The education reform known as 'education for quality' is emblematic of this art in its aim to cultivate high 'quality' individuals who possess a spirit for innovation. This movement is broad, and it includes the dissemination of expert advice to ordinary parents. 'Adjusting the Bonds of Love' is a dissertation-to-book project that examines the intersection between popular advice and the lived experience of raising a child amongst urban, middle-class families. It explores the tension between the regulatory power of expert advice on the one hand, and the challenges posed by uneven economic development on the other. The lived experience of this tension amongst ordinary parents, and the practical strategies they develop in the face of uncertainty, reveal how global transformations articulate with the most intimate of human experiences. 'Adjusting the Bonds of Love' is an exploration into the nature of moral agency, experienced and expressed in the management of life contingencies. In the contemporary Chinese context, moral agency involves something the author calls the 'art of disposition': the art of discerning the nature of situations, and of determining where action is either possible or required. The book project offers this concept as a way of more radically connecting the scale of the political with the scale of the everyday, by demonstrating a mutual correspondence between different modalities of power - between governmentality on the one hand, and the 'native's' concern with worldly efficacy on the other.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Newton-Fisher, Nicholas E.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Kent, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 2, 2005
Project Title: 
Newton-Fisher, Dr. Nicholas E., U. of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom - To aid research and writing on 'Sexual Coercion in Chimpanzees: Reproductive and Behavioural Strategies' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

NICHOLAS E. NEWTON-FISHER, University of Kent, Canterbury, England, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in August 1995 to support the analysis and writing on 'Sexual Coercion in Chimpanzees: Reproductive and Behavioural Strategies,' based upon research undertaken in the Budongo forest, Uganda. Violence by male chimpanzees towards females has been presented as a good model for understanding the evolutionary function of similar aggression in humans, as sexual coercion. During this study, the level of male-female aggression was quantified and the proposal that it functions as sexual coercion was investigated. From a dataset containing 1794 aggressive, and 821 sexual, interactions, it was found that females experienced regular and consistent male aggression that imposed time and opportunity costs. Males appeared to gain a mating benefit from aggression directed towards females, but this relationship was complicated by female counter-strategies, primarily 'refusing to be intimidated' and 'retaliation'. Females formed coalitions against male aggression in some circumstances, and appeared more gregarious than elsewhere; possibly as a consequence, male aggression seemed less severe than in other populations. In addition to pursuing this research, the fellowship supported further writing on aspects of chimpanzee behaviour, and the editing of a collective volume on the primates of western Uganda.

Publication credit:

Newton-Fisher, Nicholas, Melissa Thompson, Vernon Reynolds, Christophe Boesch, and Linda Vigilants. 2010. Paternity and Social Rank in Wild Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes) from the Budongo Forest, Uganda. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 142(3):417-428.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$30,233

Belharte, Stefanie Anja

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 29, 2007
Project Title: 
Belharte, Dr. Stefanie Anja, Independent Scholar, Canterbury, UK - To aid research and writing on 'Agroforestry and Agrocentrism: Tropical Land Use as a Test-Bed for Conventional Concepts of Human-Environment Relations' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. STEFANIE BELHARTE, Independent Scholar, Canterbury, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Fellowship in October 2007, to aid research and writing on 'Agroforestry and Agrocentrism: Tropical Land Use and a Test-Bed for Conventional Concepts of Human-Environment Relations.' The manuscript looks at the question 'Why cultivate?' from an ecological angle, focusing on tropical subsistence strategies, in particular in Southeast Asia and Oceania. A comparative literature review suggests that the strategies recognized as 'rainforest foraging,' 'sago subsistence', 'agroforestry,' and 'swiddening (shifting cultivation)' are all based on a sequence of vegetational disturbance and subsequent regrowth; that this sequence is variously manipulated through human labor in two dimensions: the degree of regrowth management (clearing, weeding, planting) and the length of the regrowth/cropping period (annual/perennial resources); and that the various expressions of these two dimensions in contemporary forms and their evolutionary antecedents represent the branches of an evolutionary tree. Supported by a case study from lowland New Guinea, it also indicates a trend towards increasing modification, substitution, and curtailment of the regrowth. An explanation for this trend may lie in the co-evolutionary relationships between resources and their human users. Dependent on resource characteristics, these relationships generate a variously forceful self-amplifying dynamic, which draws resource users towards cultivation, and can thus via the management of woody perennials arrive at contemporary swidden vegeculture.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Ross, Douglas Edward

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Simon Fraser U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 7, 2010
Project Title: 
Ross, Dr. Douglas Edward, Simon Fraser U., Burnaby, Canada - To aid research and writing on 'Material Life and Socio-Cultural Transformation among Asian Transmigrants In British Columbia' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. DOUGLAS E. ROSS, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in October 2010 to aid research and writing o 'Material Life and Socio-Cultural Transformation among Asian Transmigrants in British Columbia.' The book resulting from this writing project is based on doctoral research at Simon Fraser University, comprising a comparative archaeological study of everyday consumer habits and the construction of diasporic ethnic identities among two communities of Chinese and Japanese laborers at a turn-of-the-twentieth century salmon cannery in British Columbia. Focus is on how diasporic population movements and the relationships migrants maintain with both home and host societies shape aspects of their everyday lives, with particular emphasis on consumer habits and the formation of collective identities. This study develops a picture of cultural persistence and change that reflects the complexity of migrant experiences in the context of choices, constraints and socio-economic and political circumstances in China, Japan and Canada. Results demonstrate that migrant consumption patterns draw on traditions from the homeland, but are not straightforward reproductions of these things in a new setting; rather, they are influenced by a range of factors at the local, regional and international levels. Furthermore, diasporic identities are as much a product of the migration process itself and of these contextual factors as they are of homeland traditions and consumer goods play a significant role in their construction and maintenance.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Downey, Gregory J.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Macquarie U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2005
Project Title: 
Downey, Dr. Greg, Macquarie U., Ryde, Australia - To aid research and writing on 'Homo Athleticus: Comparative Sports and Human Physiological Diversity' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. GREG DOWNEY, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2006 to aid research and writing on 'The Athletic Animal: Sports and Human Potential.' The book uses a wide range of research on athletes from across many cultures - from Kenyan runners and Korean pearl divers, to no-holds-barred fighters in Brazil and Korean archers - to highlight how humans drive their own physiological and neurological development into distinctive configurations through training regimens, especially running, climbing, throwing, fighting, hitting, and other sports-related activities. Although athletes are extreme examples, they illustrate clearly how culture, patterns of behaviour, training, and body ideals have tangible effects on our bodies and brains. Based in dynamic systems theory and reappraisals of phenotypic plasticity, the book attempts to demonstrate a problem-driven synthesis of findings from both biological and cultural anthropology. Growing out of the research related to this book were also several articles, including one that explored how coaching in the Afro-Brazilian martial art and dance, capoeira, facilitates novices' acquisition of their own idiosyncratic movement techniques, and another on the relation of the 'mirror neuron' system in the human brain to imitative learning in skill acquisition.

Publication Credit:

Downey, Greg. 2008. Scaffolding Imitation in Capoeira: Physical Education and Enculturation in an Afro-Brazilian Art. American Anthropologist 110(2):204-213

Downey, Greg. 2010. 'Practice without Theory': A Neuroanthropological Perspective on Embodied Learning. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute (N.S.):S22-S40.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$36,253

Solis, Gabriel P.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Urbana, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 9, 2004
Project Title: 
Solis, Dr. Gabriel P., U. of Illinois, Urbana, IL - To aid research and writing on 'Playing with the Past: Thelonious Monk and the Performance of Jazz History' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. GABRIEL SOLIS, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in February 2004 to research and writing on 'Playing with the Past: Thelonious Monk and the Performance of Jazz History,' which resulted in the publication of 'Monk's Music: Thelonious Monk and Jazz History in the Making' (University of California Press, 2007). The book addresses significant aspects of the overlap and distinctions between history and cultural memory in the limited case of a musical tradition. Focusing on the ways the contemporary jazz scene deploys a historical imagination in musical performance and meta-musical discourse, this project demonstrates ways that jazz musicians actively maintain and contest their own history and memory in music. Questions about the general process of memorialization in jazz are addressed in this project through a situated close investigation of the contemporary jazz world's cultivation of the work of one influential 'ancestor' figure, Thelonious Monk. This was a particularly useful focus because Monk's work has been claimed as historical precedent and influence by essentially every jazz musician currently working. As such, the case usefully highlighted the ways that contemporary jazz musicians develop a bifurcated sense of themselves participating in both a unified and an internally riven musical and social practice. Ultimately, the contribution of this project is the documentation of ways that music functions as an exceptionally cogent social mode for crafting cultural memories.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Frink, Lisa

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Nevada, Las Vegas, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 13, 2004
Project Title: 
Frink, Dr. Lisa, U. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV - To aid research and writing on 'A Tale of Three Villages: Gender and the Processes of Colonization in Western Alaska' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

FRINK, DR. LISA, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, received a Hunt Fellowship in May 2004 to aid research and writing on 'A Tale of Three Villages: Gender and the Processes of Colonization in Western Alaska.' The publications funded by the Hunt Fellowship focus on the development of ideas and interpretation of data that investigate the stages, consequences, and mechanisms of cultural change instigated by colonialism in descendent coastal western Alaska. The research focuses on the interplay of social and economic change and the historically contingent relationships of people, materials, and space. Even though coastal Yup'ik Eskimo communities were relatively sheltered from regularized relations with Russian and later Anglo-American colonists until the early twentieth century, technologies, materials, and ideologies were entwined within the indigenous cultural system. This series of publications explores the complex relationships between precolonial practices, colonial imports, and the redefinition of social identity roles, relationships, and authority. Of note are the tensions that center on the subsistence and market sectors and how technologies and ideologies can aggravate precolonial cultural fissures already present, particularly among groups of women and men, young and old.

Publication Credit:

Frink, Lisa. 2006. Social Identity and the Yup’ik Eskimo Village Tunnel System in Precolonial and Colonial Western Coastal Alaska. Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association, 16:109-125.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$30,000

Yen, Yueh-Ping

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
London School of Economics
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 4, 2001
Project Title: 
Yen, Dr.Yueh-Ping, London School of Economics, London, United Kingdom - To aid research and writing on 'In Search of True Characters: An Anthropological Study of Chinese Calligraphy and Writing' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$14,970

Horton, Sarah Bronwen

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Colorado, Denver, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 14, 2010
Project Title: 
Horton, Dr. Sarah Bronwen, U. of Colorado, Denver, CO - To aid research and writing on 'Medical Entrepreneurs: Middle Class Americans in the Medical Borderlands' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. SARAH HORTON, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2010 to aid research and writing on 'Medical Entrepreneurs: Middle Class Americans in the Medical Borderlands.' Research examines the way that middle class Americans have increasingly adopted medical travel as a response to the neoliberal restructuring of the U.S. health care system. The project explores the way that the restructuring of the U.S. health care system has instilled a neoliberal spirit of medical entrepreneurialism towards health among middle class Americans, and proposes that medical travel is an expression of this spirit. The grantee has examined this through two manuscripts. One, 'Medical Entrepreneurs: Middle Class Americans in the Medical Borderlands,' examines middle class Americans' seeking of pharmaceuticals in Mexico as a response to their under- and un-insurance, and shows that middle class Americans increasingly self-diagnose and self-medicate as they internalize the neoliberal ethic of being an 'informed consumer.' A second manuscript, 'Medical Tourism and the Health Care 'Gray Market' in Baja California,' examines the contradictions of medical tourism as a development strategy through the lens of bariatric surgery. This study shows that even as economists tout medical tourism as a means of gainful economic development-and of diverting black market economic flows to legal channels-it has also led to an expansion of 'gray market,' or illicit, medical treatments.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Lee, AnRu

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California State U., Sacramento
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 7, 2002
Project Title: 
Lee, Dr. AnRu, California State U., Sacramento, CA - To aid research and writing on 'In the Name of Harmony and Prosperity: Labor and Gender Politics in Taiwan's Economic Restructuring' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. ANRU LEE, of California State University in Sacramento, California, received a Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship in June 2002 to aid research and writing on labor and gender politics in Taiwan's recent economy. Since the 1980s, Taiwan has grown into a global manufacturing powerhouse, a model of success that has inspired emulation throughout the developing world. Yet at the very peak of this expansion, Taiwan began to feel squeezed by changes both domestic and international. Lee's book, In the Name of Harmony and Prosperity: Labor and Gender Politics in Taiwan's Economic Restructuring, examines Taiwan's economic restructuring since the late 1980s. In it Lee discusses the latest phase of Taiwan's socioeconomic development-most importantly, the dialectical relationship between its export-oriented industrialization, changes in production processes, discourses on work ethics, and the subject formation of women workers-as it relates to conditions in the global economy. At the center of the study is the process by which labor-capital relations become fair and legitimate. The study contributes to the understanding of Asian capitalism and its role in the world economy.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000