Khlinovskaya Rockhill, Elena Vladimirovna

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cambridge, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 25, 2007
Project Title: 
Khlinovskaya Rockhill, Dr. Elena Vladimirovna, U. of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK - To aid research and writing on 'Lost to the State: Family Discontinuity, Social Orphanhood and Residential Care in the Russian Far East' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. ELENA KHLINOVSKAYA ROCKHILL, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in August 2007 to aid writing and research on 'Lost to the State: Family Discontinuity, Social Orphanhood and Residential Care Institutions in the Russian Far East.' The funding supported writing a book based on the grantee's doctoral research of social orphans, or children who have living family members but grow up in residential care institutions in post-Soviet Russia. The book examines the relationship between the family, the state and the child at the moment of a kinship breakdown, either real or imagined by the state. It demonstrates a skewed power balance based on the moral judgment of the parents. The author proposes a new way of understanding kinship through institutions and ideology with the state in a co-parenting and parenting role, which allows to negate the birth family and to provide the child with another family, that of the state and society. Through narratives of care-leavers the author reveals their views on 'social orphanhood.' The book also reflects on similarities between Soviet/post-Soviet child welfare practices, and those of some western democracies, and discusses the possible nature of these similarities.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Muehlmann, Shaylih Ryan

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
British Columbia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Muehlmann, Dr. Shaylih Ryan, U. of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada - To aid research and writing on 'When I Wear My Alligator Boots: Narcotrafficking In The US-Mexico Borderlands' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. SHAYLIH RYAN MUEHLMANN, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship to aid research and writing on 'When I Wear My Alligator Boots: Narcotrafficking in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands.' The specter of drug-related violence in northern Mexico has had a powerful media presence in the last few years, but the story of those who are most vulnerable to the violence of the drug trade, and most susceptible to the promise of its rewards, is seldom told. The book manuscript, 'When I Wear My Alligator Boots: Narco-Culture in the US-Mexico Borderlands,' analyzes the experiences of ordinary working class people in the borderlands who are recruited to work in the lowest echelons of the drug trade, as 'burreros' (mules) and 'narcotraficantes' (traffickers). These people do not live in the epicenters of drug-associated violence, such as the urban battlegrounds of Juarez and Tijuana, but in the far rural outskirts of such border cities. They live at the edges of 'the war on drugs,' where both the trade and violence and the hope it generates nonetheless permeate everyday life. The book explores a crucial tension at the heart of 'the war on drugs:' that despite the violence and suffering brought on by drug cartels, narco-trafficking represents one of the few promises of upward mobility for the rural poor in Mexico's north as well as a powerful source of cultural identification and local prestige.

Publication Credit:

Muehlmann, Shaylih. 2013. When I Wear My Alligator Boots: Narco-Culture in the USSMexico Borderlands. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Balikci, Anna

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Namgyal Institute of Tibetology
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 13, 2004
Project Title: 
Balikci, Dr. Anna, Namgyal Institute of Tibetology, Gangtok, India - To aid research and writing on 'Buddhism and Shamanism in Village Sikkim' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. ANNA BALIKCI, Namgyal Institute ofTibetology, Sikkim, India, received a Hunt Fellowship in January 2005 to aid research and writing on the relation between Buddhism and shamanism in a Bhutias (Lhopos) village of north Sikkim. She prepared a book titled Lamas, Shamans and Ancestors: Village Religion in Sikkim to be published by Brill Academic Publishers. The book is intended as a contribution to the anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayas and to the ongoing debate concerning the relation between Buddhism and shamanism. It examines the working associations between Buddhist lamas and shamans, taking into consideration the sacred history of the land as well as its more recent political and economic transformation. Their interactions are presented in terms of the contexts in which lamas and shamans meet, these being rituals of the sacred land and its resources; of the individual and household; of village and state. In contrast to the recent literature that suggests an opposition of both practices, this study reveals an unusual tolerance on the part of Sikkimese village lamas towards the shamans or bon practitioners who have remained entirely independent of the monastic establishment in terms of initiation, training and practice. This independence has allowed the rare survival of archaic bon rituals on the fringes of the Tibetan cultural area. Similarities with North Asian shamanism, particularly that of the Daur Mongols on whom the impact of Buddhism had also been minimal suggests that the practice of the Sikkimese-Lhopo shamans may be located on the very southern edge of the Siberian complex. A separate article was prepared on Lepcha shamanism. Much ritual and other exchanges have taken place between both ethnic groups over three centuries. This new material was presented at a seminar and ethnographic film festivals in Europe.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$19,300

Redmond, Anthony

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Sydney, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 22, 2003
Project Title: 
Redmond, Dr. Anthony, U. of Sydney, Sydney, Australia - To aid research and writing on 'The Implications of Ngarinyin Body Imagery for Understanding Kin-Based Personhood' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. ANTHONY REDMOND, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, was awarded a Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship in July 2003 to aid research on writing on 'The Implications of Ngarinyin Body Imagery for Understanding Kin-Based Personhood.' Additional fieldwork supplemented existing ethnographic data from five years of previous fieldwork with Ngarinyin people in the Northern Kimberley. Interviews with neighboring Gija people, with whom Ngarinyin people engage in exchange relationships, focused in detail the upon the local wurnan exchange system and the transmissions of works of local composers in the junba tradition. Comparisons were drawn out between these types of exchanges and the more mundane sharing of resources within the same inter-clan and inter- familial networks. The period spent discussing these issues with the neighbors of the Ngarinyin, in particular Gija people at Yulumbu, opened up new perspectives on this question while simultaneously observing the kinds of internal conflicts created over ownership of dreamt materials when a senior custodian of the songs has died. The literature component of the research was directed towards overcoming the more positivist positions current in Australian studies by drawing upon the rich legacy of Melanesianist studies of the person and the sociality of exchange. The research also sought to clarify how the social reproduction of the person draws sustenance from the realm of the dead while simultaneously asserting the agency of living persons.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$14,492

Darling, Eliza Jane

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 18, 2006
Project Title: 
Darling, Dr. Eliza Jane, Independent Scholar, Bristol, UK- To aid research and writing on 'The Sheltering Grove: The Gentrification of Adirondack Nature' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. ELIZA DARLING, Goldsmiths College, University of London, London, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Fellowship in October 2006 to aid research and writing on 'The Sheltering Grove: The Gentrification of Adirondack Nature.' This work contributes to the growing field of scholarship on rural gentrification, using the Adirondack Park in upstate New York as a case study. The study argues that the gentrification-induced displacement of the local working class in a central Adirondack community is symptomatic of a confluence of political economic and sociocultural circumstances that have turned the region into a factory for the production of a constellation of commodities whose value embodies the redemptive qualities of wilderness. The research draws together the literatures on urban social theory and rural studies to explore commonalities and dissonances across rural and urban iterations of gentrification and its attendant processes. The grantee posits rural gentrification as an outgrowth of the 'Arcadian regime of accumulation,' a specialized (and spatialized) aspect of flexible accumulation which has come to characterize post-productive rural landscapes whose economic strategies -- from ecotourism to second-home development -- are contingent upon the profitable production of experiences, identities and traditions related to broad cultural constructions of rural space, while manifesting in goods and services specific to particular rural places.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Smith, Tanya M.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2013
Project Title: 
Smith Dr. Tanya, Harvard U., Cambridge, MA - To aid research and writing on 'The Evolution of Human Life History' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary abstract: For over 150 years, scientists have puzzled over remains of our fossil ancestors, classifying them in varying degrees of 'human-like' or 'ape-like.' Teeth are common in fossil assemblages, and they preserve precise records of daily growth and age at death, remaining unchanged for millions of years. Importantly, tooth formation is used to reconstruct the scheduling of growth and development (life history) in fossils. My research will: 1) reassess the relationship between first molar eruption and life history while controlling for evolutionary relationships; 2) longitudinally document tooth eruption and life history in living wild chimpanzees; and 3) assess the evolution of human development through a cutting-edge study of early hominin juveniles. This project will critically examine fundamental theories about the predictive value of molar eruption ages, directly test the association between tooth eruption and life history within our closest living relative, and yield the most comprehensive developmental assessment of hominins predating Neanderthals. Four research articles will be published, followed by a review article that integrates these findings and articulates a vision for the future of hominin life history reconstruction. Understanding the evolution of growth and development is crucial for understanding unique human attributes such as long childhoods and extended post-reproductive periods.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Flora, Janne Karina

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cambridge, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 9, 2013
Project Title: 
Flora, Dr. Janne Karina, U. of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK - To aid research and writing on 'Relatedness, Loneliness and Longing in Greenland' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary abstract: Having been bestowed the names of recently deceased relatives, each person on the Island is a reincarnated or 'returned' person. Names are like souls that denote personhood and personal characteristics. And with the name, each returned person inherits the social roles and positions in their deceased namesakes' kinship networks, thus bridging the gap between life and death. Return however, necessitates feelings of absence, longing and loneliness. This project is based on extensive ethnographic research in a small village in northwest Greenland. It explores kinship and relatedness through the lens of loneliness and longing and asks: what does loneliness do to kinship? The project argues that loneliness is not merely a mirror-side, but rather an integral part of kinship and relatedness; one which Islanders frequently engage and manage in 'doing' kinship and rendering it meaningful.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$26,667

Wernke, Steven A.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 8, 2005
Project Title: 
Wernke, Dr. Steven A., U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC - To aid 'Andean Interfaces: An Archaeo-History of Community, State, and Landscape in the Peruvian Highlands' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

STEVEN A WERNKE, Vanderbilt University, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2006 to support research and writing on 'Andean Interfaces: An Archaeo-History of Community, State, and Landscape in the Peruvian Highlands'. The book (under contract, University Press of Florida) integrates archaeological and ethnohistorical research to produce a local-scale view of the negotiation and transformation of community and land-use organization during terminal prehispanic and early colonial times in the Colca Valley of southern Peru. It traces the development of the regionally important Collagua ethnic polity and explores how local Inka provincial administrative centers grafted onto local communities, how such provincial outposts were transformed into missionary outposts during early colonial times, and how a subsequent viceroyalty-wide resettlement program in the 1570s built upon and transformed local conceptions and features of community and landscape. Through Geographical Information System-based analysis of a series of Spanish colonial administrative surveys in the Colca Valley, Andean Interfaces presents a detailed reconstruction of early colonial land tenure patterns, which are used to interpret pre- and post-Hispanic patterns of settlement, political organization, and land use. The fellowship also supported the publication of journal articles for American Anthropologist, the International Journal of Historical Archaeology, and two edited volume chapters. Two further journal articles near completion were initiated with the support of this fellowship.

Publication Credit:

Wernke, Steven A. 2007. Negotiating Community and Landscape In the Peruvian Andes: A Transconquest View. American Anthropologist 109(1):130-152.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$15,600

Henfrey, Thomas W.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Kent, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 24, 2004
Project Title: 
Henfrey, Dr. Thomas W., U. of Kent, Canterbury, UK - To aid research and writing on 'Ethnoecology, Resource Use, Conservation, and Development in a Wapishana Community in Southern Guyana' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. THOMAS W. HENFREY, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in November 2004 to aid research and writing on 'Ethnoecology, Resource Use, Conservation, and Development in a Wapishana Community in Southern Guyana.' The role of traditional ecological knowledge in the engagement with conservation and development of Wapishana populations in Guyana was investigated using a holistic analytical framework. This framework was based upon an informative mutual critique of integral ecology, and holistic approaches within ecological anthropology, leading to a model more complex and detailed than the former, broader and more coherently organised than the latter. Its application to Wapishana subsistence practices identifies the employment by actors of a pluralistic cognitive perspective as the key factor in reconciling ecological and productive criteria. The same is true for intercultural interchanges: if dominated by a uniformly rationalistic perspective, as is typical in conservation and development, these will be intercultural frontiers at which cultural diversity is diminished, rather than intercultural edges at which it is enhanced. For conservation and development initiatives to be enhancing rather than destructive to cultural diversity requires that they be based upon pluralistic perspectives consistent with those identified as being characteristic of traditional knowledge systems.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$17,424

Kilshaw, Susie

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
College London, U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 29, 2007
Project Title: 
Kilshaw, Dr. Susie, U. College London, London, United Kingdom - To aid research and writing on 'Friendly Fire: An Anthropological Account of Gulf War Syndrome' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. SUSIE KILSHAW, University College London, London, United Kingdom, received a Hunt Fellowship in October 2007 to aid research and writing about the Gulf War Syndrome (GWS) community in the UK. She prepared a book that conveyed a new complexity to understanding this and other emerging illnesses. Impotent Warriors: Gulf War Syndrome, Masculinity and Vulnerability (Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2009) examines GWS as an illness of its time, revealing its similarity to other contested illnesses and they way it is shaped by wider cultural anxieties. However, the work also shows the illness to be an expression of distress that is unique to a particular group of people. By looking at the narratives that surround GWS, insight is gained into the social and cultural dimensions of the illness and in what ways this has influenced sufferers' understandings. GWS symptom reporting can be interpreted as a vehicle to draw attention to and a means to communicate concerns of the people it affects; issues such as trust, life within a dramatically changing military, gender roles, and toxicity. Revealing how an anthropological approach is necessary to better understanding the condition, the book challenges biomedicine's interpretation of GWS as a psychiatric and somatizing condition. Biomedicine has a rigid, limited view of illness and suffering that is unhelpful and obscures our understanding of illnesses such as GWS. Modernity and increasing individualism as well as the anxieties of (post)modernity are topics of great interest to anthropology and this book contributes to this ongoing discourse.

Publication Credit:

Kilshaw, Susie. 2009. Impotent Warriors: Gulf War Syndrome, Vulnerability and Masculinity.
Berghahn Press: New York, Oxford.

Kilshaw, Susie. 2009. Obligations to Veteran Informants: Contentious Research and Stakeholder Engagement. Anthropology News 50 (5):28-29.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$40,000