Boric, Dusan

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cardiff U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 8, 2009
Project Title: 
Boric, Dr. Dusan, U. of Cardiff, Cardiff, United Kingdom - To aid research and writing on 'Whirlpools' Harvesters: Adaptations and Transformations of Mesolithic Foragers in the Danube Gorges' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. DUSAN BORIC, University of Cardiff, Cardiff, United Kingdom, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in October 2009, to aid research and writing on 'Whirlpools' Harvesters: Adaptations and Transformations of Mesolithic Foragers in the Danube Gorges.' This book project will be published by the Oxford University Press. The funding made possible the updating and synthesizing of various strands of archaeological evidence now available from the Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in the Danube Gorges of the north-central Balkans. This case study presents the best data for the understanding of Early Holocene adaptations of forager societies of temperate southeast Europe and provides an unprecedented example for the reconstruction of Mesolithic-Neolithic transformations in the whole of Old World Prehistory. Combining re-analyses of old collections and excavation archives, recent archaeometric analyses and evidence from new excavations, the author pieces together a complex picture of diachronic changes affecting these small-scale societies in this particular region of the Balkans over several millennia (c. 13,000-5500 BC). While of immediate relevance for Mesolithic and Neolithic studies in Europe, this research has a cross-cultural perspective in shedding light on the nature and mechanisms of culture changes in forager communities worldwide. It is intended that the resulting book will be published in 2012.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Biehl, Joao Guilherme

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Princeton U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 21, 2002
Project Title: 
Biehl, Dr. Joao, Princeton U., Princeton, NJ - To aid research and writing on 'Pharmaceutical Governance: The Development of the Brazilian AIDS Model' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. JOAO BIEHL, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in November 2002 to aid research and writing on 'Pharmaceutical Governance: The Development of the Brazilian AIDS Model.' Brazil has, against all odds, invented a public way of treating AIDS. In 1996, it became the first developing country to adopt an official policy that universalized access to life-saving drugs. Both AIDS mortality and the use of hospital services have subsequently fallen by 70 percent, and the Brazilian policy is now hailed as a model for stemming the AIDS crisis in the developing world. The book 'Will to Live: AIDS Drugs and Local Economies of Salvation' documents how this life-saving policy came into existence amidst entrenched inequality. It explores Brazil's inventive combination of activist forces, the interests of a reforming state, transnational organizations, and the pharmaceutical industry. The book draws from research carried out over the last ten years among people working in state, corporate, scientific, and nongovernmental institutions, and also from longitudinal research among marginalized AIDS patients and grassroots care services. Overall, 'Will to Live' illuminates a shift that the Brazilian AIDS policy represents: from a crumbling welfare state to an activist state; from international and public health understood as prevention and clinical care to access to medication; and from political to biological rights as a new form of pharmaceutical citizenship takes form.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Kuan, Teresa

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Whittier Colllege
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 6, 2011
Project Title: 
Kuan, Dr. Teresa, Whittier College, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research and writing on 'Adjusting the Bonds of Love: Chinese Governmentalities and Lived Experience in Post-Mao China' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. TERESA KUAN, Whittier College, Los Angeles, California, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2011 to aid research and writing on 'Adjusting the Bonds of Love: Chinese Governmentalities and Lived Experience in Post-Mao China.' China's economic strategy for building a knowledge economy depends on the art of subject-making. The education reform known as 'education for quality' is emblematic of this art in its aim to cultivate high 'quality' individuals who possess a spirit for innovation. This movement is broad, and it includes the dissemination of expert advice to ordinary parents. 'Adjusting the Bonds of Love' is a dissertation-to-book project that examines the intersection between popular advice and the lived experience of raising a child amongst urban, middle-class families. It explores the tension between the regulatory power of expert advice on the one hand, and the challenges posed by uneven economic development on the other. The lived experience of this tension amongst ordinary parents, and the practical strategies they develop in the face of uncertainty, reveal how global transformations articulate with the most intimate of human experiences. 'Adjusting the Bonds of Love' is an exploration into the nature of moral agency, experienced and expressed in the management of life contingencies. In the contemporary Chinese context, moral agency involves something the author calls the 'art of disposition': the art of discerning the nature of situations, and of determining where action is either possible or required. The book project offers this concept as a way of more radically connecting the scale of the political with the scale of the everyday, by demonstrating a mutual correspondence between different modalities of power - between governmentality on the one hand, and the 'native's' concern with worldly efficacy on the other.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Hill, Sarah

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Western Michigan U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 13, 2004
Project Title: 
Hill, Dr. Sarah, Western Michigan U., Kalamazoo, MI - To aid research and writing on 'Matter In and Out of Place at the U.S.- Mexico Border' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. SARAH HILL, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in May 2004 to aid research and writing on 'Matter In and Out of Place at the U.S.-Mexico Border.' This fellowship aided publication of research that explores the relationship between wastes and resources, production and disposal, and pollution and social boundaries. These publications show how immigrants get blamed for border pollution, how an early 20th century U.S.-Mexico boundary dispute characterized border garbage disposal, and why Michigan thinks Toronto's trash is dirtier than its own. During the tenure of the fellowship (June 2004-May 2005), the grantee made significant progress on several publications that explore empirically and theoretically the relations between waste and resources, production and destruction, and pollution and boundaries.The ethnohistorical context of this project draws from long-term research at the U.S.-Mexico border (since 1992). In addition, the grantee's more recent residence (since 2002) near the U.S.-Canadian border (in Kalamazoo, Michigan), has expanded comparative analysis in this venture, thanks to an on-going dispute at this international boundary over the importation of Canadian municipal solid waste to a Detroit-area landfill.

Publication Credits:

Hill, Sarah. 2005. The Chamizal Tipping Point? El Paso’s Garbage in 1910. Passwords, the Quarterly Journal of the El Paso County Historical Society 50(3):142-149.

Hill, Sarah. 2005. The Trouble with Toronto’s Trash. Rhizone, Newsletter of the Environmental Studies Association of Canada 15(1):12-13.

Hill, Sarah. 2006. Purity and Danger on the U.S.-Mexico Border, 1990-1994. South Atlantic Quarterly 105(4):777-800.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Smith, Tanya M.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2013
Project Title: 
Smith Dr. Tanya, Harvard U., Cambridge, MA - To aid research and writing on 'The Evolution of Human Life History' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary abstract: For over 150 years, scientists have puzzled over remains of our fossil ancestors, classifying them in varying degrees of 'human-like' or 'ape-like.' Teeth are common in fossil assemblages, and they preserve precise records of daily growth and age at death, remaining unchanged for millions of years. Importantly, tooth formation is used to reconstruct the scheduling of growth and development (life history) in fossils. My research will: 1) reassess the relationship between first molar eruption and life history while controlling for evolutionary relationships; 2) longitudinally document tooth eruption and life history in living wild chimpanzees; and 3) assess the evolution of human development through a cutting-edge study of early hominin juveniles. This project will critically examine fundamental theories about the predictive value of molar eruption ages, directly test the association between tooth eruption and life history within our closest living relative, and yield the most comprehensive developmental assessment of hominins predating Neanderthals. Four research articles will be published, followed by a review article that integrates these findings and articulates a vision for the future of hominin life history reconstruction. Understanding the evolution of growth and development is crucial for understanding unique human attributes such as long childhoods and extended post-reproductive periods.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Londono Sulkin, Carlos D.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Regina, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 3, 2005
Project Title: 
Londono-Sulkin, Dr. Carlos D., U. of Regina, Regina, Canada - To aid research and writing on 'Moral Selfhood and the Achievement of Social Life among Muinane People, Colombia' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. CARLOS D. LONDONO-SULKIN, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, was awarded a Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship in January 2005 to fund the production of a monograph describing the ongoing achievement of social life of Muinane and other People of the Center (Colombian Amazon), and how this life was shaped by their morally evaluative understandings of themselves and of their interactions. The monograph portrays their social organization and cosmology, how individuals talked about these matters, and particularly how they articulated their decisions and moral evaluations of their own and others' subjectivities and actions, often in the very terms with which they talked about mythical origins, clans and lineages, and interspecies relations. The monograph emphasizes the point that selfhood and social life are products of individuals' interactions, and hence insists on describing particular instances of dialogue and other symbolic deployments. It also discusses the matter of key debates in current Amazonianist scholarship, concerning cosmological perspectivism and the place of alterity in Amazonian sociality. The monograph features chapters on moral selfhood; perspectivism, the human and the inhuman; key person-constituting substances such as tobacco, coca, manioc, cool herbs and hot chilies; virtue and social organization; knowledge and agency; and quotidian and occasional predatory transformations.

Publication Credit:

Londono Sulkin, Carlos David. 2010. People of No Substance: Imposture and the Contingency of Morality in the Colombian Amazon. In Ordinary Ethics: Anthropology, Language and Action. Michael Lambek ed. New York: Fordham University Press. 273-291.

Londono Sulkin, Carlos D. 2008. Instrumental Speeches, Morality, and Masculine Agency among Muinane People (Colombian Amazon). Tipiti, The Journal of the Society of the Anthropology of Lowland South America 1-2(4):199-222

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$30,242

Milne, Sarah

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 2, 2014
Project Title: 
Milne, Dr. Sarah, Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid research and writing on 'Saving Nature? The Politics and Practice of Internatinal Conservation in Cambodia' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary abstract: This project examines contemporary global efforts to 'save nature', as seen in the ideas and practices of big conservation organisations. It is important to study these organisations through a critical anthropological lens, because they now have significant influence over how natural resources are managed globally, and an ability to shape fundamentally the relationships between people and nature across the planet. Often their actions take place in tropical developing countries, where biodiversity is most abundant and threatened, and where human needs compete with the demands of conservation projects. The result is a complex, transnational and highly political realm of work; about which little in known. In addition, as environmental problems escalate, many conservation groups are increasingly turning to 'the market' as a tool for saving nature: this neoliberal strategy, with the potential to commodify nature, has unknown effects in practice. My research sheds light upon the nexus of all these issues. I conducted a ten-year study of a major US-based conservation group (2002-2012) and its attempts to implement a market-based conservation project in the remote Cardamom Mountains of Cambodia. Through a multi-sited 'insider ethnography', I reveal how policy ideas were created and implemented across scales; and how unintended consequences emerged when these 'global' ideas were transformed by the local Cambodian context, often in dangerous or damaging ways. Observing project dynamics closely, I saw the conservation organisation's inability/unwillingness to address the gaps between theory and practice. Rather, it focused on the image of success only; highlighting the grave consequences of 'corporate conservation' for people and nature.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$33,340

Wernke, Steven A.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 8, 2005
Project Title: 
Wernke, Dr. Steven A., U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC - To aid 'Andean Interfaces: An Archaeo-History of Community, State, and Landscape in the Peruvian Highlands' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

STEVEN A WERNKE, Vanderbilt University, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2006 to support research and writing on 'Andean Interfaces: An Archaeo-History of Community, State, and Landscape in the Peruvian Highlands'. The book (under contract, University Press of Florida) integrates archaeological and ethnohistorical research to produce a local-scale view of the negotiation and transformation of community and land-use organization during terminal prehispanic and early colonial times in the Colca Valley of southern Peru. It traces the development of the regionally important Collagua ethnic polity and explores how local Inka provincial administrative centers grafted onto local communities, how such provincial outposts were transformed into missionary outposts during early colonial times, and how a subsequent viceroyalty-wide resettlement program in the 1570s built upon and transformed local conceptions and features of community and landscape. Through Geographical Information System-based analysis of a series of Spanish colonial administrative surveys in the Colca Valley, Andean Interfaces presents a detailed reconstruction of early colonial land tenure patterns, which are used to interpret pre- and post-Hispanic patterns of settlement, political organization, and land use. The fellowship also supported the publication of journal articles for American Anthropologist, the International Journal of Historical Archaeology, and two edited volume chapters. Two further journal articles near completion were initiated with the support of this fellowship.

Publication Credit:

Wernke, Steven A. 2007. Negotiating Community and Landscape In the Peruvian Andes: A Transconquest View. American Anthropologist 109(1):130-152.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$15,600

Shaw, Susan Judith

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 29, 2007
Project Title: 
Shaw, Dr. Susan Judith, U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid research and writing on 'Identity, Community and the Governmentality of Primary Health Care in the U.S.' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. SUSAN J. SHAW, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in October 2007 to aid research and writing on 'Identity, Community and the Governmentality of Primary Health Care in the U.S.' As local governments and organizations assume more and more responsibility for ensuring the public health, identity politics play an increasing yet largely unexamined role in public and policy attitudes towards local problems. Governing How We Care: Contesting Community and Defining Difference in U.S. Public Health Programs analyzes local struggles over community health as a window onto the diverse meanings of governance, citizenship, and identity formation. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted between 1998-2004 in urban Thornton, Massachusetts, this book places community health -- a critically understudied area -- at the center of analyses of contemporary transformations in governing. The work opens to analysis those bodies of knowledge and collective decisions about how best to ensure the community health and welfare, rather than taking them as givens. A series of case studies -- including a community health outreach program for women on welfare; online developments in culturally appropriate health care; and community struggles over HIV prevention programs for injection drug users -- highlight the new concepts of community and forms of identity being constructed and administered in local and broader struggles over health. This book will attract readers in anthropology (especially medical anthropology and the anthropology of policy), poverty studies, ethnic studies, public health, and government, with its synthesis and novel application of current modes of theorizing to new domains of social life and practice.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$40,000

West, Paige

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rutgers U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2001
Project Title: 
West, Dr. Cathrine P., Rutgers U., New Brunswick, NJ - To aid research and writing on 'Conservation and Development at Crater Mountain' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

Publication Credit:

West, Paige. 2003. Knowing the Fight: The Politics of Conservation in Papua New Guinea. Anthropology in Action 10(2):38-45.

West, Paige. 2004. Translation, Value, and Spac