Milne, Sarah

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 2, 2014
Project Title: 
Milne, Dr. Sarah, Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid research and writing on 'Saving Nature? The Politics and Practice of Internatinal Conservation in Cambodia' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary abstract: This project examines contemporary global efforts to 'save nature', as seen in the ideas and practices of big conservation organisations. It is important to study these organisations through a critical anthropological lens, because they now have significant influence over how natural resources are managed globally, and an ability to shape fundamentally the relationships between people and nature across the planet. Often their actions take place in tropical developing countries, where biodiversity is most abundant and threatened, and where human needs compete with the demands of conservation projects. The result is a complex, transnational and highly political realm of work; about which little in known. In addition, as environmental problems escalate, many conservation groups are increasingly turning to 'the market' as a tool for saving nature: this neoliberal strategy, with the potential to commodify nature, has unknown effects in practice. My research sheds light upon the nexus of all these issues. I conducted a ten-year study of a major US-based conservation group (2002-2012) and its attempts to implement a market-based conservation project in the remote Cardamom Mountains of Cambodia. Through a multi-sited 'insider ethnography', I reveal how policy ideas were created and implemented across scales; and how unintended consequences emerged when these 'global' ideas were transformed by the local Cambodian context, often in dangerous or damaging ways. Observing project dynamics closely, I saw the conservation organisation's inability/unwillingness to address the gaps between theory and practice. Rather, it focused on the image of success only; highlighting the grave consequences of 'corporate conservation' for people and nature.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$33,340

Al-Mohammad, Hayder

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Southampton, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 5, 2012
Project Title: 
Al-Mohammad, Dr. Hayder, U. of Southampton, Southampton, UK - To aid research and writing on 'The Precariousness of Dwelling: Entangled Lives and Ethics In Post-Invasion Iraq' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary abstract: 'The Precariousness of Dwelling: Entangled Lives And Ethics In Post-Invasion Iraq' is a book project based on more than two years of fieldwork, conducted between 2005-2010, in the southern Iraqi city of Basra. The project explores how several decades of war, sanctions, intifadas, and military occupation, and now gang, militia and tribal battles, have ravaged the city of Basra and the lives of its inhabitants. Amongst such destruction, however, people have still to live their lives; it is in the pragmatics of living that I have sought to motivate an analysis which puts into question what forms of work and struggles go into dwelling. Relying on personal accounts and life-histories of several people I became close to in Basra, I try to bring to prominence some of the precariousness, but also the physicality, labour, and ethical work which goes into making a life liveable, a word inhabitable, in post-invasion Iraq. Contrary to much research which tends to think of life as something a priori, or given, in the contexts and people I have worked with one glimpses the sheer burden to maintain life and its reciprocal reliances. As I show throughout this project, the struggles of and for being cannot be located in persons separately, rather, the struggle of being is always a struggling-with, or a struggling-against, for those one cares for and looks after. Thus, crucial to this project is the attempt to think of ethics outside of an 'ethics of the self' to what I call an 'ethics of being-with': that is, how in Basra lives take in the lives of others and struggle and battle for those other lives -- particularly in moments and experiences of precariousness.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Potter, Ben Austin

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Alaska, Fairbanks, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 25, 2007
Project Title: 
Potter, Dr. Ben Austin, U. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK - To aid research and writing on 'Site Structure and Organization in Central Alaska: Archaeological Investigations at Gerstle River' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. BEN A. POTTER, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship to aid research and writing on 'Site Structure and Organization in Central Alaska: Archaeological Investigations at Gerstle River.' This work involved substantial modifications of a PhD dissertation as well as additional research on the topics of hunter-gatherer subsistence patterns in the Subarctic. Work on the manuscript went smoothly, and the final work was completed in May 2008. Significant new research included a model for understanding the use of space at this temporary foraging camp and a regional study focusing on how microblades were used within technological and food-getting systems and how these systems changed through time. Various book prospectuses were written and sent to prospective publishers, with the manuscript accepted by University of Utah Press. Additionally, aspects of this research and writing were presented at national and regional archaeology meetings, and two related peer-reviewed articles were published during this award period.

Publication Credit:

Potter, Ben. 2008. Exploratory Models of Intersite Variability in Mid to Late Holocene Central Alaska. Arctic 61(4):407-425.

Potter, Ben. 2008. Radiocarbon Chronology of Central Alaska: Technological Continuity and Economic Change. Radiocarbon 50 (2):181-204.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$30,000

Ciabarri, Luca

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Milano-Bicocca, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 6, 2011
Project Title: 
Ciabarri, Dr. Luca, U. of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy - To aid research and writing on 'Dubai Style: The Emergence of Somaliland and the Extraversion of Society: Towards an Ethnography of Commercial Routes' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. LUCA CIABARRI, University of Milano, Italy, received a Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship in April 2011 to aid research and writing on 'Dubai Style: The Emergence of Somaliland and the Extraversion of Society. Towards an Ethnography of Commercial Routes.' This study addresses the topic of social change in situations of prolonged violence, crisis, and transition. The emergence of Somaliland in the 1990s out of the Somali civil war is taken as specific case-study. Through the prism of the international trading networks and commercial activity, a prominent feature of Somaliland dynamics, the study depicts a post-conflict social landscape built up at the intersection of local political renewal, forced migration, readjustment of commercial relationships along the trading route connecting Dubai and Far East to Somaliland and Ethiopia, and a general process of internationalization of society. The pivotal role of Dubai in inspiring throughout the 1990s local models of development (a commercial state, a transit economy) is expressed in the metaphor of 'Dubai style' and shows the complex but precarious inclusion of Somaliland in the international economic system. Economic networks are here analyzed by looking at the link between economic realm and social and political processes. The study, in other words, sheds light on the transformation of economic capital into social and political capital and the articulation between the two domains. In addition, economic networks are analyzed in their relationship with territory, as specific forms of territorial integration and spatial arrangement: the commercial corridor and the commercial routes.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Shaw, Susan Judith

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 29, 2007
Project Title: 
Shaw, Dr. Susan Judith, U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid research and writing on 'Identity, Community and the Governmentality of Primary Health Care in the U.S.' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. SUSAN J. SHAW, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in October 2007 to aid research and writing on 'Identity, Community and the Governmentality of Primary Health Care in the U.S.' As local governments and organizations assume more and more responsibility for ensuring the public health, identity politics play an increasing yet largely unexamined role in public and policy attitudes towards local problems. Governing How We Care: Contesting Community and Defining Difference in U.S. Public Health Programs analyzes local struggles over community health as a window onto the diverse meanings of governance, citizenship, and identity formation. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted between 1998-2004 in urban Thornton, Massachusetts, this book places community health -- a critically understudied area -- at the center of analyses of contemporary transformations in governing. The work opens to analysis those bodies of knowledge and collective decisions about how best to ensure the community health and welfare, rather than taking them as givens. A series of case studies -- including a community health outreach program for women on welfare; online developments in culturally appropriate health care; and community struggles over HIV prevention programs for injection drug users -- highlight the new concepts of community and forms of identity being constructed and administered in local and broader struggles over health. This book will attract readers in anthropology (especially medical anthropology and the anthropology of policy), poverty studies, ethnic studies, public health, and government, with its synthesis and novel application of current modes of theorizing to new domains of social life and practice.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Feldman, Ilana

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 30, 2004
Project Title: 
Feldman, Dr. Ilana, Columbia U., New York, NY - To aid research and writing on 'Governing Gaza: Bureaucratic Service and the Work of Rule (1917-1967)' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. ILANA FELDMAN, Columbia University, New York, New York, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in July 2004 to aid research and writing on 'Governing Gaza: Bureaucratic Service and the Work of Rule (1917-1967),' forthcoming from Duke University Press in 2008. Governing Gaza is a study of the civil service in Gaza during the British Mandate (1917-1948) and the Egyptian Administration (1948-1967). Drawing on extensive ethnographic and archival research, this book pursues an anthropology of government in two interrelated senses. First, it explores the life and work of governing institutions, elucidating how regimes with tenuous, always uncertain, relationships to the place of governance were able to persist and also when and how this persistence failed. Secondly, and just as significantly, it examines how working in government shaped the people and place of Gaza. In exploring the details of service work, the book traces the practice of 'tactical government,' a self-consciously restricted mode of rule that made it possible for government to persist without claiming legitimacy, and in fact precisely by holding legitimacy in abeyance. Governing Gaza also explores how bureaucratic authority was produced in a context that lacked a stable authorizing framework. This investigation elucidates mechanisms of 'reiterative authority' that relied on the workings of bureaucracy itself - the networks of filing and the habitual practices of civil servants.

Publication Credit:

Feldman, Ilana. 2005. Everyday Government in Extraordinary Times: Persistence and Authority in Gaza?s Civil Service, 1917-1967. Comparative Studies in Society and History 47(4):863-891.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$27,067

Vidacs, Beata M.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, York College, City U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 20, 2005
Project Title: 
Vidacs, Dr. Beata M., City U. of New York, Jamaica, NY - To aid research and writing on 'Visions of a Better World: Football in the Cameroonian Social Imagination' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. BEATA M. VIDACS, City University of New York, New York, New York, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in July 2005, to aid writing and research on 'Visions of a Better World: Football in the Cameroonian Social Imagination.' The book focuses on the social and political significance of soccer in Cameroon in order to understand issues of national and ethnic identity formation, political culture in the postcolony and the meanings the sport holds for Cameroonians. Looking at soccer on different levels ? local, national and international ? it examines the interconnections of nationalism and ethnicity, how people view the government and their place in the larger world, as well as their relationship to France, the former colonizer. It places soccer in the postcolonial context of present day Cameroon, arguing that it provides both a model of and a model for Cameroonian society. On the one hand the sport reflects and reproduces the country?s historically conditioned social realities, and on the other, soccer serves to articulate a moral vision of a better world, where justice, equity and merit prevail. In this sense the sport is part of the Cameroonian social imaginary. The contradictions between the two lead in part to frustration, but in part the sport maintains its idealized status and thus incites hope.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Halperin, Christina Tsune

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Urbana, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 16, 2009
Project Title: 
Halperin, Dr. Christina Tsune, U. of Illinois, Urbana, IL - To aid research and writing on 'State and Household: Tracing Social and Political Relations through the Materiality of Classic Maya Figurines' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. CHRISTINA T. HALPERIN, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in April 2009 to aid research and writing on 'State and Household: Tracing Social and Political Relations through the Materiality of Classic Maya Figurines.' The fellowship was instrumental in the writing of the majority of the book, with the final manuscript is expected to be submitted to the University of Texas Press in the spring of 2011. The manuscript examines the complex, interconnected, and contentious relationship between state and households in ancient Maya society through the study of a poorly understood artifact class: ceramic figurines. The book reveals 'un-official' or popular forms of expression as well as the processes in which state claims and symbols were incorporated and embodied in localized contexts. In addition to the writing of the manuscript, the fellowship has allowed the grantee to write articles related to this research project for the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology (2010), a Society of Economic Anthropology edited volume (2011), and Revista Petén Itzá (2011).

Publication Credit:

Halperin, Christina T., and Antonia E. Foias. 2010. Pottery Politics: Late Classic Maya Palace Production at Motul de San José, Petén, Guatemala. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 29(3):392-411.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Karchmer, Eric Ivan

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 29, 2007
Project Title: 
Karchmer, Dr. Eric Ivan, Independent Scholar, Weston, MA - To aid research and writing on 'Orientalizing the Body: Postcolonial Transformations in Chinese Medicine' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

DR. ERIC I. KARCHMER, an independent scholar located in Weston, Massachusetts, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in October 2007 to aid research and writing on 'Orientalizing the Body: Postcolonial Transformations in Chinese Medicine.' Orientalizing the Body is an ethnography of the hybrid practices that doctors of Chinese medicine have adopted to suit the institutional demands of modern health care delivery in China. Medicine in contemporary China is shaped by postcolonial power asymmetries: doctors of Chinese medicine practice two types of medicine, Chinese medicine and Western medicine, while their Western medicine counterparts learn only one. Despite the social imperative for doctors of Chinese medicine to use both medical systems, they have not developed an overarching theory of integration. Instead they rely on a small set of 'Orientalist' comparisons that posit the two medical systems as mirror images of each other, especially with regards to efficacy, anatomy, and diagnosis. These seemingly innocuous comparisons operate as purifying claims that both marginalize the clinical scope of Chinese medicine to the chronic, the functional, and the hard-to-diagnose, while also enabling clinical innovation by facilitating its integration with Western medicine. The manuscript traces the historical emergence of these Orientalist formulations and their implications for contemporary practice, demonstrating that the dual processes of purification and hybridization, simultaneously constraining and expanding the horizons of clinical practice, have become the central organizing dynamic in the modern development of Chinese medicine.

Publication Credit:

Karchmer, Eric. 2010. Chinese Medicine in Action: On the Postcoloniality of Medical Practice in China. Medical Anthropology 29(3): 226-252.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Karkazis, Katrina A.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Stanford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 16, 2004
Project Title: 
Karkazis, Dr. Katrina A., Stanford U., Palo Alto, CA - To aid research and writing on 'The Intersex Debates: Clashes in Culture and Science' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. KATRINA A. KARKAZIS, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in January 2005 to aid research and writing on 'The Intersex Debates: Clashes in Cultue and Science.' The fellowship enabled the grantee to write full time from January 2005 to October 2005 towards completion of the manuscript. During this period, the grantee completed substantial revisions to the manuscript, which included a major reorganization of the material and a substantial cut of almost over one-third of the material. The grantee was not able to finalize the manuscript, but the revised manuscript has since been submitted to Duke University Press for final approval.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$29,130