Wiley, Katherine Ann

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Grant Year
2010

KATHERINE ANN WILEY, then a student at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, was awarded funding in May 2010, to aid research on 'From Slavery to Success: Gendered Economic Strategies in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania,' supervised by Dr. Beth Anne Buggenhagen. This project examined women's market work and economic activities including their participation in exchange circuits in Kankossa, a town in southern Mauritania.

Wilbur, Alicia K.

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Grant Year
2003

ALICIA K. WILBUR, then a student at University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was awarded a grant in June 2003 to aid research on 'Genetics of Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Native South Americans,' supervised by Dr. Anne C. Stone. Tuberculosis is a significant health problem for the majority of the world's populations. Evidence indicates that host genetics play an important role in determining susceptibility to tuberculosis, and research in various populations worldwide indicates that multiple loci are usually involved, and that these loci differ by population.

Wikberg, Eva Carolina

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Grant Year
2010

EVA C. WIKBERG, then a student at the University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, received funding in May 2010 to aid research on 'Facultative Female Dispersal in Female Colobus vellerosus and Other Primates,' supervised by Dr. Pascale Sicotte. An increasing body of evidence suggests that there is significant within-population variation in dispersal, both in human and non-human primate societies. The aim of this study is to investigate dispersal in a population of black-and-white colobus (Colobus vellerosus) residing at Boabeng-Fiema, Ghana.

Wienia, Martijn

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Grant Year
2005

MARTIJN WIENIA, while a student at Leiden University, the Netherlands, was awarded a grant in January 2006 to aid research on 'Ritual and the Construction of Konkomba Autochthony in Northern Ghana,' supervised by Prof. Dr. Peter Pels. Political liberalization often brings along a violent obsession with belonging. In Sub-Saharan Africa, this often correlates with the tension between democratization and 'traditional' authority.

Widmer, Alexandra E.

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Grant Year
2003

ALEXANDRA WIDMER, while a student at York University in Toronto, Canada, received funding in March 2003 to aid research on the constitution of health and subjectivity in Vanuatu, under the supervision of Dr. Margaret Rodman. Widmer looked at changing articulations of the nature of Vanuatu people (ni-Vanuatu) in biomedical, Christian, colonial, development, and kastom discourses regarding health, beginning in the 1850s.

Widger, Thomas

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Grant Year
2005

THOMAS WIDGER, then a student at London School of Economics, London, England, was awarded a grant in January 2005 to aid research on 'The Youth Suicide Epidemic in Sri Lanka: Causes, Meanings, Prevention Strategies,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan Parry. Suicide in Sri Lanka has been a major health and social problem for the past four decades. The research project examined the social and psychological causes, cultural meanings, and formal and informal preventions strategies of suicidal behaviour amongst the Sinhalese of a small town on the northwest coast of the island.

Whitten, Margarete Jean

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2014

Preliminary abstract: The Affordable Care Act is predicted to spur a decentralization of hospitals in the United States, stimulating the growth of localized community health centers and services to accommodate 32 million formerly uninsured people. In the absence of universal health care, how is the responsibility to care for vulnerable populations directed and organized? How has the connection between structural inequality and suffering in vulnerable populations been elided and reconstrued as incidental, blameless and random?

Whitt, Clayton Abel

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Grant Year
2013

CLAYTON A. WHITT, then a graduate student at University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, was granted funds in April 2013 to aid research on 'Climate Change and Spatial Transformations in the Bolivian Highlands,' supervised by Dr. Gaston R. Gordillo. This project employed ethnographic methods to explore the day-to-day, on-the-ground experience of climate change in a Quechua-speaking sheep-, dairy-, and quinoa-producing community in the western highlands of Bolivia, located at 12,000 feet of elevation.

Whitehouse, Bruce

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Grant Year
2004

BRUCE WHITEHOUSE, then a student at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, received funding in September 2004 to aid research on 'Transnationalism among Sahelian Migrants in Brazzaville, Congo,' supervised by Dr. Daniel J. Smith. This project examined the causes and consequences of the migration flow between the contemporary states of Mali, in West Africa, and the city of Brazzaville in Congo, Central Africa. The study considered this migration stream both in contemporary and historical contexts, and situated it as one component of a multilocal and transnational social space.