Wu, Ifan

Approve Date
Grant Year
2014

Preliminary abstract: Qigong, an ancient Chinese healing practice, has become increasingly popular among the female Chinese minority in Malaysia. Grounded on the belief that cosmic energy is polluted and stagnant and therefore 'blocks' one's physical energy, qigong heals by allowing practitioners to clear 'blockage,' a diagnosis that covers everything from a stiff neck to frustrations with the pursuit of personal success.

Wroblewski, Michael

Approve Date
Grant Year
2008

MICHAEL WROBLEWSKI, then a student at University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, received funding in April 2008 to aid research on 'Subject Shifting and Style Sampling: The Creation and Sanctioning of Voice in Amazonian Ecuador,' supervised by Dr. Jane H. Hill. Increased interethnic contact, language revitalization and standardization projects have introduced controversial new forms of expression for indigenous Kichwas living and working in the urbanizing Amazonian region of Tena, Ecuador.

Wright, Arielle Justine Oliver

Approve Date
Grant Year
2014

Preliminary abstract: Botswana has been profoundly affected by the HIV epidemic over the past two decades. In response to the overwhelming demand for care, Botswana introduced the Community Home Based Care (CHBC) program in 1998, which trained local volunteers to assist families with the care of HIV patients at home. My preliminary research suggests that the program contributes to re-negotiations of responsibility for the sick between kin, community and government agencies.

Wren, Brandi Tennille

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Grant Year
2008

BRANDI TENNILLE WREN, then a student at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, was awarded funding in May 2008, to aid research on 'Behavioral Ecology of Primate-Parasite Interactions,' supervised by Dr. Melissa Jane Remis. The goal of this research is to better understand how primate social behavior and ecology influence parasite transmission. This study used behavioral observations and parasitological analyses of fecal samples from 3 groups of wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) at Loskop Dam Nature Reserve, South Africa.

Wouters, Jelle Joseph Pieter

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Grant Year
2012

JELLE J.P. WOUTERS, then a graduate student at North-Eastern Hill University, Meghalaya, India, was awarded a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'Exploring State and Nonstate Approaches to Socio-Economic Development in Nagaland,' supervised by Dr. Tanka B. Subba. This ethnographic research focused on the Chakhesang and Chang Naga communities in the hilly and tribal state of Nagaland in northeast India.

Worthington, Nancy Hayden

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Grant Year
2011

NANCY H. WORTHINGTON, then a student at Barnard College, New York, New York, received a grant in April 2011 to aid research on ''Healing Hearts and Training Minds in Honduras': Pediatric Heart Surgery Missions and Globally Circulating Biotechnologies,' supervised by Dr. Lesley Sharp. In poor countries, children with heart defects either go untreated, which can result in an early death, or are transferred overseas for surgical intervention. Now these children are treated in country by traveling cardiovascular teams.

Wool, Zoe Hamilton

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Grant Year
2007

ZOE H. WOOL, then a student at University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, received a grant in May 2007 to aid research on 'In Search of the War on Terror: An Ethnography of Soldiers Lives and Public Discourses,' supervised by Dr. Todd Sanders. This project explores embodied experiences and discursive constructions of the U.S.-led War on Terror through ethnographic research with injured soldiers and their families at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

Woodard, Lauren

Approve Date
Grant Year
2016

Preliminary abstract: While recent scholarship on migration has highlighted how governments have sought to restrict population movement, this project examines the politics of migration from another vantage point, drawing on the anthropology of policy and development. Through Russia's Resettlement of Compatriots Program, state officials seek to attract, rather than repel, immigrants by expanding citizenship to include those who broadly identify themselves as aligned with the country's interests.

Wood, Summer Jayne

Approve Date
Grant Year
2011

SUMMER J. WOOD, then a student at New York University, New York, New York, received a grant in October 2011 to aid research on 'Counting Children, Making Children Count: Birth Registration, Health and Human Rights in Tanzania,' supervised by Dr. Sally E. Merry. Birth registration is a basic human right. However, in Tanzania today only 16 percent of children have birth certificates, despite birth registration laws dating back nearly a century. Why are rates of birth registration so low in Tanzania?

Wood, Brian Madison

Approve Date
Grant Year
2006

BRIAN M. WOOD, then a student at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Male Food Production, Transfers, and Household Provisioning among Hadza Hunter-Gatherers,' supervised by Dr. Frank Marlowe. This research among Hadza hunter-gatherers of northern Tanzania indicates that, contrary to earlier reports using less comprehensive and precise data, men distribute the foods they acquire in ways that differentially benefit their own households.