Shapero, Joshua Aprile

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Shapero, Joshua Aprile, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Speaking Places: The Grammar of Space and the Sociality of Place among Central Quechua Speakers,' supervised by Dr. Bruce Mannheim

JOSHUA A. SHAPERO, then a graduate student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, was awarded a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'Speaking Places: The Grammar of Space and the Sociality of Place among Central Quechua Speakers,' supervised by Dr. Bruce Mannheim. This project examines patterns of spatial orientation in language and environmental practice in the Rio Negro watershed, in the north-central Peruvian Andes. The study integrated ethnographic, grammatical, and experimental methods to show how speakers of the endangered language, Ancash Quechua, engage their physical environment through language and practice, and how this is changing intergenerationally. Ancash Quechua speakers communicate spatial relations by means of allocentric Frames-of-Reference; in other words, systematically using place-names and local topography, as in 'Juan's house is toward Rio Sawan,' or 'the cup is on the uphill side of the table.' This habitual integration of environmental knowledge with the grammar serves as a mechanism mediating spatial orientation in language and cognition and the cultural patterns of environmental practice that constitute meaningful places, such as seasonal pasturing, the collection of medicinal herbs, and place-bound rituals of healing, divination, and sacrifice. The high grasslands called the puna or hallqa are central here. Pastoralism in this zone has persisted across successive periods of political fragmentation and violence in the last several millenia. This study shows that the persistence of complex patterns of practice such as hallqa pastoralism are not due simply to cultural, economic, or ecological determinants, but to a mutual relationship between environmental practice, language structure, and cognition.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$19,380

Huang, Yu

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Huang, Yu, U. of Washington, Seattle, WA - To aid research on 'Cultivating 'Science-Savvy' Citizens: Empowerment and Risk in Shrimp Aquaculture Development in China,' supervised by Dr. Ann Anagnost

YU HUANG, then a student at University of Washington, Seattle Washington, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'Cultivating 'Science-Savvy' Citizens: Empowerment and Risk in Shrimp Aquaculture Development in China,' supervised by Dr. Ann Anagnost. This research seeks to investigate how, in the context of China's economic reforms, aquaculture has become a site where the state engineers new forms of citizenship to fit the demands of the global economy, and how new forms of subjectivity around empowerment and risk emerge in tension with state projects. While slogans of 'scientific aquaculture' hailed farmers' pursuit of unprecedented high-yields in the 1990s, recently, the focus of science extension has shifted to the promotion of 'healthy aquaculture.' This research traces how scientific aquaculture was produced 'in action' as a result of friction between the state's neoliberal policies, scientists' social aspirations, and farmers' conceptualization of risks. Research sites include stationary sites such as a village dominated by small family farms and a large state-owned collective farm, as well as mobile sites such as science extension activities including fish veterinary training workshops and food safety inspection trips. In addition, the researcher rented a shrimp farm to conduct experimental shrimp farming. Evidence from this project will not only help facilitate more conversations between fishery managers and shrimp farmers, but it will collaborate with both experts and lay people to speculate on the possibilities of new forms of agency in a globalized economy.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$21,871

Mika, Marissa Anne

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pennsylvania, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 11, 2012
Project Title: 
Mika, Marissa Anne, U. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA - To aid research on 'Experimental Infrastructures: Building Cancer Research in Uganda from 1950 to the Present,' supervised by Dr. Steven Feierman

MARISSA A. MIKA, then a graduate student at University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, received a grant in October 2012 to aid research on 'Experimental Infrastructures: Building Cancer Research in Uganda from 1950 to the Present,' supervised by Dr. Steven Feierman. This multi-sited ethnographic project examined the ways in which a new set of research initiatives on HIV-related malignancies are reshaping the landscape of oncology services at the Uganda Cancer Institute. The Institute, a historic site of cancer research and care established in the 1960s, is undergoing rapid changes as it shifts from being 'the place where you were sent to die' to a site of international research excellence. The research phase receiving support examined the ways in which a partnership between a cancer research organization in the United States and the Uganda Cancer Institute is dramatically reshaping the built infrastructure of care and research services. Focusing on the story of two buildings, the project examined the ways in which new facilities and partnerships are displacing and reshaping long established oncology practices that were fundamentally shaped by Uganda's history of crisis, namely civil war and the AIDS epidemic. The project explored the way partners understand the ethics of collaboration, the minutiae of constructing facilities despite vast distances, and the challenges of tearing down old, long established sites in the name of progress. This project examined the political stakes of oncology in the Global South.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$14,100

Cumberland, Linda A.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Indiana U., Bloomington
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 4, 2001
Project Title: 
Cumberland, Linda A., Indiana U., Bloomington, IN - To aid research on 'A Grammar of Assiniboine,' supervised by Dr. Douglas R. Parks

LINDA A. CUMBERLAND, while a student at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, received funding in January 2001 to aid research on a grammar of Assiniboine, under the supervision of Dr. Douglas R. Parks. Cumberland conducted 12 months of research at several Assiniboine reserves in Saskatchewan, Canada, in order to write a grammar of this severely endangered member of the Siouan language family. Most of the research was conducted at Carry The Kettle reserve, near Regina, Saskatchewan, where the majority of Canada's 50 remaining native speakers of Assiniboine live. To create a temporary speech community where none existed, Cumberland created what she called 'language circles,' bringing together small groups of fluent speakers for a day and recording their conversation. This method of producing spontaneous speech yielded a wealth of forms and information that would have been unattainable in formal elicitation interviews. Portions of the dialogues were transcribed and analyzed, revealing grammatical particles previously unknown and pragmatic use of known forms in novel ways. Cumberland also conducted methodologically standard elicitation sessions in which she recorded a range of stories and songs, including a set of local histories of supernatural events. Data collected during this project were to be compared with data collected in the 1980s and 1990s by Douglas R. Parks (Indiana University) at Fort Belknap, Montana, to write a culturally informed grammar of Assiniboine that reflected regional variations.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$8,250

Saavedra Espinosa, Mariana

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cornell U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Saavedra Espinosa, Mariana, Cornell U., Ithaca, NY - To aid research on '(Re)producing Successful Succession: Colombia's Family Business Project,' supervised by Dr. Annelise Riles

MARIANA SAAVEDRA ESPINOSA, then a graduate student at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, was awarded funding in April 2014 to aid research on '(Re)producing Successful Succession: Colombia's Family Business Project,' supervised by Dr. Annelise Riles. This project explored recent efforts by Colombian 'entrepreneurial elite families' to rationalize and professionalize their relationship with the businesses they own by means of expert recommended strategies. Through ethnographic methods that approached 'family business' contextually, the research studied its deliberate reconfiguration not only as an expert solution, but as a particular form of constituting relations of kin. Employing participant-observation, in-depth interviews, and archival research, the grantee inquired into the methods, ideas, and technologies involved in the shift in the status of 'family business' from problem to solution in the Colombian entrepreneurial imagination. The grantee worked in spaces where expert knowledge on family businesses is both shared and consumed, and where some of its recommendations are applied, in order to ask: how are different actors reconfiguring 'family business' as a viable and successful economic formation thus constituting and legitimating particular forms of social reproduction? The dissertation resulting from the research will provide an innovative approach to Colombian elites through close-up engagement with the design and implementation of strategies for succession and reproduction of family businesses, bringing into focus the practical and symbolic constitution of the perpetuation of status, as opposed to assuming it on utilitarian premises.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$18,680

Harris, Shana Lisa

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Francisco, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Harris, Shana Lisa, U. of California, San Francisco, CA - To aid research on 'Out of Harm's Way: HIV, Human Rights, and the Practice of Harm Reduction in Argentina,' supervised by Dr. Judith C. Barker

SHANA HARRIS, then a student at University of California, San Francisco, California, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Out of Harm's Way: HIV, Human Rights, and the Practice of Harm Reduction in Argentina,' supervised by Dr. Judith C. Barker. Argentina has had one of the highest rates of drug use-related HIV/AIDS prevalence in Latin America since the mid-1990s. After witnessing the failure of the government's drug abstinence-based interventions in curbing the epidemic, local civil society organizations began promoting interventions based on the principles of harm reduction. This dissertation examines how the harm reduction model traveled to and spread within Argentina by ethnographically tracing how it has been taken up and put into practice over the last decade by civil society organizations in the cities of Buenos Aires and Rosario. It focuses on how harm reductionists address not only the physical harms associated with drug use, but also those harms created by punitive, prohibitionist policies and widespread discrimination. Specifically, Argentine harm reductionists utilize the notions of 'vulnerability' and 'exclusion' to facilitate drug users' access to health and social services and to promote and protect users' human and civil rights. Drawing on the country's history of human rights abuses and economic instability, harm reductionists work to advance the idea of drug users as 'right bearers' in order to hold the state accountable for users' health and welfare and to shift the subjectivity of users from 'delinquents' to 'citizens.'

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$6,320

Witeska-Mlynarczyk, Anna Dominika

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
College London, U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 25, 2006
Project Title: 
Witeska, Anna Dominika, U. College London, London, UK - To aid research on 'Making Political Subjects in Post-Socialist Poland: Memory Workings among 'Veterans' and 'Victims of Oppression'', supervised by Dr. Michael Sinclair Stewart

ANNA WITESKA, then a student at University College London, London, United Kingdom, received funding in October 2006 to aid research on 'Making Political Subjects in Post-Socialist Poland: Memory Workings among 'Veterans' and 'Victims of Opression,'' supervised by Dr. Michael Sinclair Stewart. Research focused on the local performances of national memory politics in the aftermath of the communist regime in Poland. Looking at the processes of objectification of the communist past taking place in the authoritative settings (courtrooms, the Institute of National Remembrance, exhibition halls, official commemorative rituals, unveiling of monuments) she searched for discursive and symbolic patterns of inclusion and exclusion of political subjects into/from the commemorative landscape of the Polish historidzed state. The grantee worked mainly with two broadly defined categories of people who got politically engaged during communism: the ex-officers of the Ministry of Interior Affairs and the anti-communist activists. Combining participant observation in various institutional settings with archival work, discourse analysis, and in-depth interviews with individuals, the project tackled the mediating role that the state-institutions, their agents, and representations produced by them, have played in individual processes of remembering, commemorating, and recalling. Research findings deal with ways in which overlapping ideologically loaded notions of state, nation, sacrifice, duty, authority, democracy, Catholicism and justice become differently reconfigured in individual actions concerning the communist past. This research points towards the ambiguities of the Polish allusive model of retroactive justice and their consequences for the homo politicus of the past political era.

Publication Credit:

Witeska-Mlynarczyk, Anna. 2007. Proces W Transkrypcji. (Op.Cit.,) 3(36):41-46

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$6,515

Maidhof, Callie Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 16, 2012
Project Title: 
Maidhof, Callie Elizabeth, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'A House, a Yard and a Security Fence: Settlements and the Domestic Life of the Israeli State,' supervised by Dr. Charles Hirschkind

CALLIE E. MAIDHOF, then a graduate student at University of California, Berkeley, California, received a grant in October 2012 to aid research on 'A House, a Yard, and a Security Fence: Settlements and the Domestic Life of the Israeli State,' supervised by Dr. Charles Hirschkind. This research addresses the problems of secularism, the state, and middle-class ideology in Israel by employing an ethnographic methodology centered on the secular suburban settlement of Alfei Menashe. Lying just a few kilometers east of the Green Line, which marks the fading boundary between Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Alfei Menashe provides a useful entry point into these problems by highlighting both the labor of the state in producing and legitimizing secular, middle-class normalcy, as well as the popular assumptions regarding the constitution of political controversy and the role of religion in this process. This research takes up the question of how normal, domestic life is produced in politically contested spaces, about the political and affective labor of both state and non-state actors that goes into constructing settlement-suburbia as a part of the singular national space of Israel. This research argues that settlement is not a fringe phenomenon, as it is often portrayed by the press, but a normal and even mainstream part of Israeli life. By mobilizing secular, middle-class desire, the state has effectively managed a project of settlement in which upwards of ten percent of Jewish Israelis actually live east of the Green Line.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$24,999

Casas-Cortes, Maria Isabel

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Casas-Cortes, Maria Isabel, U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC - To aid research on 'Expertise from Below: The Cultural Politics of Knowledge, Globalization and the Activist Research Movement in Spain, supervised by Dr. Arturo Escobar

MARIA ISABEL CASAS-CORTES, then a student at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Expertise from Below: The Cultural Politics of Knowledge, Globalization and the Activist Research Movement in Spain,' supervised by Dr. Arturo Escobar. This dissertation deals with the production of systematic knowledge and expertise from below, by exploring the growing phenomenon of 'activist research,' a form of 'in-house' investigation conducted by social movements as a venue for political activism. As fieldwork has indicated, activist research is usually conducted by non-accredited experts, and aims to produce a kind of knowledge that is both rigorous and oriented towards social justice. The focus is on a prolific 'activist research' community based in Madrid, Spain. The group, Precarias a la Deriva, was identified as a promising dissertation topic due to their innovative work and broader influence. This women's collective is conducting an extensive research project on global processes of economic flexibilization, and their effects on women's everyday lives. Through feminist research expeditions in the metropolis of Madrid, this women's activist research community attempts to develop innovative political actions appropriate to current transformations. Through the exploration of such 'dissenting expertise', this ethnographic study brings different scholarly literatures together, such as the growing field of Anthropology of Social Movements, Anthropology of Knowledge, Globalization Studies as well as the long standing tradition of Action Research.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Ranhorn, Kathryn L.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
George Washington U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 9, 2015
Project Title: 
Ranhorn, Kathryn L., George Washington U., Washington, DC - To aid research on 'Late Pleistocene Lithic Technology in Eastern Africa and the Emergence of Modern Humans,' supervised by Dr. Alison S. Brooks

Preliminary abstract: The Middle Stone Age is associated with the first appearance of modern humans in Africa (McDougall et al 2005). The archaeological record of South Africa suggests the appearance of successive suites of behavior that were constrained temporally and spatially (Marean 2010; Wurz 2013). However it is unclear if these lithic trends represent social networking among MSA populations (d'Errico and Banks 2013) or could be the result of other factors like raw material or reduction intensity. Furthermore, the extent to which such patterning is unique to South Africa or is a general feature of Homo sapiens is unclear. To test whether early modern human populations were socially networked in a broader context it is necessary to consider the Late Pleistocene archaeological record from other regions in Africa in a way that directly measures temporal and spatial behavioral trends. This dissertation will test for social networking of MSA populations by quantitatively measuring patterns of lithic technological change in eastern Africa from 150-­50 ka at the regional, sub-regional, and sub-basinal scale, developing innovative methods in lithic analysis and a chrono-stratigraphic framework within a single MSA paleolandscape in the Turkana Basin. Three­-dimensional photogrammetric modeling and middle range experiments in information transfer afford a quantifiable investigation of lithic trends. By incorporating both open air and rock shelter localities, spanning highland escarpments (Mt. Eburru) and low elevation lake basins (East Turkana), this study will result in a comprehensive understanding of hominin behavior across multiple landscapes in the MSA and a clearer understanding of the role of cultural transmission in early modern human populations.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$19,690
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