Dharia, Namita Vijay

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Grant Year
2011

NAMITA V. DHARIA, then a student at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, received a grant in October 2011 to aid research on 'Building the City: An Ethnography of the Building Construction Industry in New Delhi National Capital Region, India (NCR),' supervised by Dr. Michael Herzfeld. This is an ethnography of the building construction industry in India's National Capital Region (NCR). Building construction is India's second-largest industry after agriculture and draws individuals from all classes and areas in India.

DeWitte, Sharon Nell

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Grant Year
2004

SHARON N. DEWITTE, then a student at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, received funding in April 2004 to aid research on 'Paleoepidemiological and Molecular studies of the Black Death,' supervised by Dr. James W. Wood. This project addressed several important questions about the excess mortality and selectivity of the Black Death, and it will contribute to recent debates over whether the Black Death was actually caused by bubonic plague.

Deutsch, Cheryl Lynn

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Grant Year
2014

Preliminary abstract: In a recent decision, Delhi's High Court directly challenged the car culture of India's growing middle class. Striking down a lawsuit brought by car-owners against a new bus system in the capital city, the Court argued: 'A developed country is not one where the poor own cars.

Detwiler, Kate M.

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Grant Year
2005

KATE M. DETWILER, then a student at New York University, New York, New York, received funding in August 2005 to aid research on 'Hybridization between Sympatric Cercopithecus Species in Gombe National Park, Tanzania,' supervised by Dr. Clifford J. Jolly. The project's objective is to investigate the genetic consequences of interspecific hybridization occurring among guenons (Cercopithecus ascanius and C. mitis) in Gombe National Park, Tanzania.

Desjardins, Sean Paul Alcide

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Grant Year
2012

SEAN P.A. DESJARDINS, then a student at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, received a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'The Only Means of Survival: The Ethnoarchaeology of Inuit Sea-Mammal Hunting, Foxe Basin, Nunavut,' supervised by Dr. James M. Savelle. The goal of this ethnoarchaeological project was to examine the long-term development of seal and walrus hunting practices among Inuit and their ancestors in the resource-rich Foxe Basin region of central Nunavut, Canada.

DePuy, Walker Holton

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Grant Year
2016

Preliminary abstract: The proposed research seeks to understand how rights-based discourses are produced, translated, and enacted across actor groups and governance scales in an Indonesian forest carbon project.

Deomampo, Daisy Faye

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Grant Year
2009

DAISY FAYE DEOMAMPO, then a student at the City University of New York Graduate Center, New York, New York, was awarded funding in October 2009, to aid research on 'The New Global 'Division of Labor': Reproductive Tourism in Mumbai, India,' supervised by Dr. Leith Mullings. This research examines the social, cultural, and policy implications of 'reproductive tourism,' briefly defined as the movement of people across national borders for assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs).

Deoanca, Adrian

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Grant Year
2015

Preliminary abstract: This project will investigate the relationship between the technical and socio-political dimensions of railways in postsocialist Romania. During socialism, rails have been chief material and ideological vectors of state-sponsored social modernization. Twenty-five years after the end of socialism, the infrastructure that once signified the state's capacity to deliver progress now stands for desolation and backwardness.

Dennison, Jean Marie

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Grant Year
2005

JEAN DENNISON, then a student at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, was awarded funding in November 2005, to aid research on ''Reforming a Nation: Citizenship, Government and the Osage People,' supervised by Dr. Peter R. Schmidt. This research examined the mapping of Osage identity within the context of their 2004-2006 citizenship and government reform process.

Dennis, Dannah Karlynn

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Grant Year
2014

Preliminary abstract: How do people envision and enact citizenship when the social and legal foundations of their nation-state are called into question? This doctoral research explores how citizens in contemporary Nepal are re-imagining their nation in the midst of an ongoing transition from Hindu monarchy to secular democracy. This turbulent process requires the citizens of Nepal to fundamentally re-conceptualize Nepali national identity, which has historically been defined in terms of three key elements: the Shah monarchy, state Hinduism, and the Nepali language.