Cohen, Emily Catherine

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Cohen, Emily Catherine, New York U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'A Cultural Analysis of Integrated Rehabilitation Medicine in Colombia,' supervised by Dr. Emily Martin

EMILY CATHERINE COHEN, then a student at New York University, New York, New York, was awarded funding in May 2007, to aid research on 'A Cultural Analysis of Integrated Rehabilitation Medicine in Colombia,' supervised by Dr. Emily Martin. The grantee spent one year conducting anthropological research on the social and cultural impact of landmines and rehabilitation medicine in Colombia. Colombia remains the country with the highest incident of new landmine victims in the world. Unfortunately numbers of landmine casualties and survivors rise as the war escalates over territorial control between state and non-state armed actors. Guerilla forces use landmines to protect coca fields and towns threatened by military and paramilitary incursions. Polemics exist surrounding the state and paramilitary use of landmines. Research was conducted in Bogota at the Military Hospital, the Military Batallion, Otto-Bock Corporation, and civilian refugee homes, as well as throughout Colombia including: Cali, Bucaramanga, Medellin, Quibdo, and Villavicencio. The archives at El Tiempo newspaper and at Bogota's National Library were explored to compare Colombia's current focus on integrated rehabilitation to an earlier historical period, La Violencia, focused on dismemberment and bizarre re-configurations of the body. This project hopes to contribute to anthropological questions that ask what it means to be a full human person in cross-cultural contexts as well as those affected by long-term warfare and ongoing civil conflict.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$6,245

Schulthies, Becky L.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 8, 2004
Project Title: 
Schulthies, Becky L., U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid research on 'Media Scripts and Interpretive Processes in Arab Domestic Discourse,' supervised by Dr. Norma Mendoza-Denton

BECKY L. SCHULTHIES, then a student at University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, was awarded a grant in July 2004 to aid research on 'Media Scripts and Interpretive Processes in Arab Domestic Discourse,' supervised by Dr. Norma Mendoza-Denton. The objective of this study is to investigate how media scripts and language ideologies contribute to Moroccan and Lebanese domestic dialogues and interpretations of current transnational events. Media scripts refer to television and radio input or information circulated through entextualization processes (embedded direct and indirect quotations and references framed by a particular discussion). These media scripts include stories, statistics, historical dates, anecdotes and projections that Moroccan and Lebanese families utilize and manage in interpretive discussions. Given the array of multilingual and Arabic dialect programming available in Morocco and Lebanon, language ideologies play a significant role in which media scripts are appropriated and how they are managed in family settings. This research merges the ethnography of media reception with careful linguistic analysis of domestic discourse in order to understand the social life of media scripts within domestic conversations and family collaborative interpretive processes as they relate to viewing practices. Video and audio-recordings of fifteen families in Morocco and eight in Lebanon were made while they watched television several times a week over a period of three months. Informal interviews were conducted with family members to background the media sources and specific social, historical, and economic factors shaping the landscape in which these families assemble interpretive frameworks. Conversation and discourse analysis techniques were applied to selected transcripts to show how participants are orienting to media, assuming linguistic stances in relation to transnational identities, and evaluating truth-value of information through deixis, intonation, gesture and topic control.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$15,069

Harper, Kristin Nicole

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Emory U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Harper, Kristin Nicole, Emory U., Atlanta, GA - To aid research on 'The Origin of Syphilis and the Evolution of the Treponema Pallidum Subspecies: A Phylogenetic Approach,' supervised by Dr. George John Armelagos

KRISTIN N. HARPER, then a student at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'The Origin of Syphilis and the Evolution of the T. pallidum Subspecies: A Phylogenetic Approach,' supervised by Dr. George Armelagos. Comparative genetics was used to examine the long-standing question of where and when syphilis originated. Did Christopher Columbus and his men bring syphilis from the New World to the Old, as believed for five hundred years? Or did syphilis always exist in the Old World, only to be differentiated from other diseases such as leprosy around the time of the first recorded epidemic of the disease, in Naples in 1495? Strains of the bacterium that causes syphilis, as well as those that cause the related but non-venereal diseases yaws and bejel, were gathered from around the world. Various locations around the genome were analyzed, and the sequences were used to build a phylogenetic, or family, tree of the bacteria. The results were used to demonstrate that syphilis arose most recently in human history and that its closest relatives were yaws strains gathered from South America. This evidence, combined with paleopathological studies, provides compelling evidence for the Columbian hypothesis for syphilis's origin. In addition, genes that have undergone strong positive selection, consistent with an important role specific to syphilis strains, were identified.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$23,828

Marchesi, Milena

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Massachusetts, Amherst, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Marchesi, Milena, U. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA - To aid research on 'Remaking Subjects: Cultural Politics, Practices, and Technologies of Fertility in Italy,' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth Louise Krause

MILENA MARCHESI, then a student at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Remaking Subjects: Cultural Politics, Practices, and Technologies of Fertility in Italy,' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth L. Krause. Through multi-sited research that included participant observation and volunteering in a family planning clinic, feminist organizations, immigrant associations, and the training of cultural mediators, the grantee traced the intensifying politics and discourses of reproduction in contemporary Italy, which include anxieties over immigration and over low fertility rates among native Italian women. This dissertation project aimed to answer the following question: How do contested and contradictory politics of reproduction materialize and contribute to remaking new and old reproductive subjects in Italy? Participant observation and interviews with Italian native women and immigrant women engaged in cultural mediation and immigrant activism shed light on the intersections of the projects of 'integration' of difference. The reordering of social reproduction in contemporary Italy engenders resistance among those who recognize themselves as targets of re/integration and its inevitable corollary of exclusion: most obviously immigrants, but also those who do not fit into the heteronormative and reproductive family model. In foregrounding the narratives and practices of those identified as a threat to cohesive social reproduction, this research sheds light on the effects of political attempts at coherence-making.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$20,828

Butler, Ella Patricia

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Butler, Ella Patricia, U. of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Producing Taste: Expertise and the Senses in the US Processed Food Industry,' supervised by Dr. Joseph Masco

Preliminary abstract: This project investigates scientific concepts of taste and sensory experience in the processed food industry in the United States. It examines how scientists develop research into the senses in order to find ways to make 'health and wellness' products palatable to the tastes of American consumers. In this context of innovation in both commodities and scientific knowledge, the project asks how scientific concepts of the senses are being transformed at the same moment that new commodities are made possible. To explore this question, the project is an ethnographic study of the work of three kinds of professionals most concerned with the sensory experience of processed food products: food scientists, flavor scientists and sensory evaluation scientists.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$19,932

Rockman, Marcy H.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 12, 2001
Project Title: 
Rockman, Marcy H., U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid 'GIS Modeling of Landscape Learning in Late Glacial Britain and Northern France,' supervised by Dr. Steven L. Kuhn

MARCY H. ROCKMAN, while a student at University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, was awarded a grant in June 2001 to aid research on 'GIS Modeling of Landscape Learning in Late Glacial Britain and Northern France,' supervised by Dr. Steven L. Kuhn. Familiarization with and adaptation to new landscapes has been an integral part of colonization and settlement throughout human history. This funded research is the first attempt in the field of archaeology to directly assess the physical traces of the landscape-learning process and consider its significance in the overall lifeways of colonizers, using the case example of the recolonization of England at the end of the last Ice Age. The specific activities supported by this grant included fieldwork documentation of the topography of flint-bearing chalk in England, archival and museum research based at the University of Southampton, and GIS analysis of European flint-bearing landscapes at the University of Arizona. The fieldwork successfully sampled flint-bearing deposits across England, which contributed significantly to an ICP-MS trace element testing project. The archival research provided provenience histories for tested artifacts and a contextual framework of late glacial lifeways. The GIS analysis compared origin and destination areas of the recolonization and identified strong landscape similarities between the Paris Basin and the ICP-MS-identified primary flint-source region of southwestern England. Therefore, the activities supported by this grant provided three major lines of evidence toward the identification and interpretation of landscape learning in the late glacial recolonization of England. When considered fully in the context of colonization theory and ethnographic information about information transmission, the funded research stands to make an important and useful contribution to our understanding of past colonizations and the development of environmental knowledge.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$13,190

Goldstein, Ruth Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 18, 2010
Project Title: 
Goldstein, Ruth Elizabeth, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'Plants, Prostitutes, and Pharmaceuticals: By the Edge and at the End of the Inter-Oceanic Road,' supervised by Dr. Charles Leslie Briggs

RUTH E. GOLDSTEIN, then a student at University of California, Berkeley, California, received funding in October 2010 to aid research on 'Plants, Prostitutes, and Pharmaceuticals: By the Edge and at the End of the Inter-Oceanic Road,' supervised by Dr. Charles Briggs. Latin America's Inter-Oceanic Road stretches from Peru's Pacific Coast to Brazil's Atlantic Coast, dipping into Bolivia. The road changes the physical and the social landscape, opening up previously inaccessible land in the Peruvian Amazon, flush with streams of gold. A stumbling world economy has stimulated a resurgence in the importance of gold. The gold attracts miners and the miners bring women. Women, ensnared by promises of working in restaurants, end up in debt-peonage sex-work, by the side of the road. Plants trafficked along the road-often sexual stimulants-go to laboratories for pharmaceutical testing and intellectual property evaluation. The gold travels along the road and then worldwide as the currency to buy and sell everything from gasoline and food, to women, plants, and pharmaceuticals. This project situates the trajectories of the women-plant-gold assemblages within the history of the taxonomic narrative and the current economic crisis, analyzing how particular groups of people have come to be treated as less-than-human. Understanding how differences among humans, animals, plants, and minerals come into being and affect national and international politics and public health policies highlights how particular groups of people have come to matter less politically-as well as the possibilities for changing that.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$19,855

Wilbur, Alicia K.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New Mexico, Albuquerque, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 10, 2003
Project Title: 
Wilbur, Alicia K., U. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM - To aid research on 'Genetics of Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Native South Americans,' supervised by Dr. Anne C. Stone

ALICIA K. WILBUR, then a student at University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was awarded a grant in June 2003 to aid research on 'Genetics of Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Native South Americans,' supervised by Dr. Anne C. Stone. Tuberculosis is a significant health problem for the majority of the world's populations. Evidence indicates that host genetics play an important role in determining susceptibility to tuberculosis, and research in various populations worldwide indicates that multiple loci are usually involved, and that these loci differ by population. Although incidence in Native American populations since European contact has been high, little research into the genetics of susceptibility has been undertaken in these groups. Here, the role of host genetics in tuberculosis susceptibility was examined the Ache and Ava of Paraguay. Three candidate genes (the vitamin D receptor, SLC11A1, and mannose binding lectin) were analyzed for association with three measures of tuberculosis status. For both the Ache and Ava, strong evidence for host involvement in tuberculosis susceptibility was found at all three candidate genes. Discordant results between the three measures of TB status indicate that future research should concentrate immune history at both the population and individual level, nutritional status, and exposure and disease status of household members. Finally, patterns of nucleotide variation at each of the loci studied point to reduced genetic variation at these immune loci, and point the way toward future studies in population history and natural selection.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$20,578

Lee, Hyeon J.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 18, 2005
Project Title: 
Lee, Hyeon J., Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid research on 'Suicide Intervention and Gendered Subjectivity in Rural China,' supervised by Dr. Bradley P. Stoner

HYEON JUNG LEE, while a student at Washington University in St. Louis, was awarded a grant in May 2005 to aid research on 'Suicide intervention and gendered subjectivity in rural China,' supervised by Dr. Bradley P. Stoner. The aim of the research was to explore local meanings of suicide as understood by different social actors, such as local officials, doctors and nurses, NGO activists, religious practitioners, and male and female villagers, as well as perceptions of gendered subjectivity related to the different practices and discourses of suicide. Specifically, the researcher focused on how suicide prevention programs construct new concepts of gender as they seek to change local ideas about suicide in rural areas. Fieldwork was carried out from July 2005 through September 2006 in two rural villages in northeastern China, one that has a suicide prevention program and another that does not. Data were gathered through multiple complementary methods, including participant observation, focus groups, in-depth and life story interviews. Additionally, the researcher collected media sources related to suicide and gender in order to develop a more complete understanding of the discourses in Chinese society relating to suicide and gendered subjectivity. Findings reveal that local discourses and practices of suicide are closely related to local conceptions of gender. Suicide prevention programs in rural areas thus focus on changing indigenous ideas about of gender among rural village residents.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$24,700

Berman, Michael David

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Diego, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 22, 2015
Project Title: 
Berman, Michael David, U. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA - To aid research on 'Empathy and the Spread of Neoliberal Selves in the Volunteer Work of a Japanese Religion,' supervised by Dr. Joseph Hankins

Preliminary abstract:In my research, I examine the relationship between empathy and the spread of neoliberalism in contemporary Japan. The relation between new forms of caring engagement and alienation are poignantly expressed in the experience of Rissh? K?sei-kai (RKK), a new religion working to maintain families and communities in Japan. RKK