Dongol, Yogesh

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Grant Year
2016

Preliminary abstract: Diverse forms of community-based conservation (CBC) projects have proliferated over the past three decades, effectively reorganizing land and resource access in thousands of rural communities worldwide. Researchers have identified questions of how and to what effect CBCs intersect with identity politics surrounding territorial claims and land rights as central. Yet relevant research results are mixed and inconclusive.

Dong, Yu

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Grant Year
2011

YU DONG, then a student at University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, received funding in April 2011 to aid research on 'Eating Identity: Millet versus Rice Consumers in Neolithic Northern China,' supervised by Dr. Stanley Ambrose. The Dawenkou Neolithic Culture (4300-2600 BC) in Shandong, northern Jiangsu and Anhui Provinces, China, provides insights into the origin of complex stratified society. The initial spread of rice from southern China to the millet agriculture-based societies of the Yellow River Valley occurred during this era.

Dolph, Charles

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Grant Year
2015

Preliminary abstract: This ethnographic and historical study analyzes how conflicting notions and historical narratives of 'terror' are intertwined with political and legal struggles over Argentina's sovereign debt. Argentina faces default for the second time in thirteen years, precipitated by the June 2014 U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding a ruling that Argentina could not pay bondholders who accepted debt restructuring without satisfying holdouts demanding payment at the bonds' face value.

Doll, Christian Joseph

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Grant Year
2014

Preliminary abstract: Shortly after gaining independence, members of the newly sovereign Government of South Sudan (GOSS), announced plans to move South Sudan's capital from the established economic and political center, Juba, to Ramciel, a remote village in the geographic center of the country.

Doherty, Jacob Matthew

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Grant Year
2012

JACOB DOHERTY, then a student at Stanford University, Stanford, California, received a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'Keep Kampala Clean: Disposability, Environmentalism, and Garbage in Urban Uganda,' supervised by Dr. James Ferguson. This project is an ethnographic study of urban-environmental politics in Kampala, Uganda. Because ongoing processes of state-directed urban transformation are being carried out in the name of 'cleaning up' the city, research focused on the ways in which cleanliness is produced, and in turn, waste and dirt are imagined and discarded.

Dogiama, Triantafyllia-Eirini

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Grant Year
2011

TRIANTAFYLLIA-EIRINI DOGIAMA, then a student at McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, was awarded funding in April 2011 to aid research on 'Points of Reference: Projectiles, Hunting, and Identity at Neolithic Catalhoyük, Turkey,' supervised by Dr. Tristan Carter. This dissertation research focuses on how social identity is constructed, expressed, and maintained through the social practice of hunting, with specific reference to the cultural biography of stone projectile points from the Neolithic Catalhoyük, Turkey (7400-6000 BC).

Doerksen, Mark David

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Grant Year
2016

Preliminary abstract: Grinders are self-described as people who take part in do-it-yourself experimental surgeries to implant electronic technology into their bodies in order to enhance their sensory abilities and transcend their corporal limits. The engineered human/machine hybrid of these implants opens up both potential for new sensory abilities and forms of communication, as well as concomitant possibilities for outside influence and interference from the resulting networks.

Doering-White, John A.

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Grant Year
2015

Preliminary abstract: This project will investigate a network of humanitarian shelters that assist migrants from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador who move through Mexico by hopping a web of freight railways known as La Bestia [The Beast]. Through a mixed-methods mobile ethnography, I examine the blurring of people and things in order to understand how an emergent humanitarian ethic and new expressions of transnational governmentality intersect around clandestine migration.

Doberne, Jennie Carmel

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Grant Year
2009

JENNIE DOBERNE, then a student at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, received funding in May 2009 to aid research on 'Technologically-Assisted Later Motherhood in Israel,' supervised by Dr. Susan McKinnon. This research queries the reproductive practices and politics of extending motherhood into the fifth and sixth decades of life among Israeli women. Through the lens of later motherhood, both the limits and horizons of Israeli pronatalism become visible.

Djordjevic, Darja

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Grant Year
2014

DARJA DJORDJEVIC, then a graduate student at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, was awarded a grant in April 2014 to aid research on 'The Cancer War(d): Onco-Nationhood in Post-Traumatic Rwanda,' supervised by Dr. Arthur Kleinman. Rwanda's national cancer program has been hailed as a unique example of how to build clinical oncology into a public healthcare infrastructure.