McCoy, Jack T.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rutgers U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 8, 2005
Project Title: 
McCoy, Jack T., Rutgers U., New Brunswick, NJ - To aid research on 'Ecological & Behavioral Implications of New Archaeological Occurrences from Koobi Fora, Kenya,' supervised by Dr. John W.K. Harris

JACK T. MCCOY, then a student at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, was awarded a grant in December 2005 to aid research on 'Ecological and Behavioral Implications of New Archaeological Occurrences from Koobi Fora, Kenya,' supervised by Dr. John W.K. Harris. Decades of investigations in Upper Burgi Member exposures (2.2 to 1.9 Ma) by many prominent paleoanthropologists have produced more than three dozen hominin body fossils but virtually no stone tools or other evidence of behavior has been reported. These exposed sediments preserve an archive of fossils that can reveal a great deal about the ecology, environment, and changing foraging behaviors of the earliest members of the genus Homo. Through the collection and analysis of the fossils of terrestrial vertebrates, it is possible to reconstruct ancient animal communities and offer hypotheses about the changing ecological niche that early human ancestors occupied. The addition of significant quantities of meat and marrow into the diet of early hominins is also visible in the fossil record. Cut marks and percussion marks are preserved on fossil bones and this evidence of hominin presence and behavior was collected during this field research along with the oldest stone tools yet discovered at Koobi Fora. This research makes it possible to construct testable hypotheses about hominin habitat and changing foraging behaviors at this critical juncture in human evolution.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$8,652

Cloutier, Christina Theresa

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Utah, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 7, 2014
Project Title: 
Cloutier, Christina U. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT - To aid research on 'Tracking Patterns of the Menopausal Transition Through Endocrine Change in the Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes),' supervised by Dr. Kristen Hawkes

Preliminary abstract: Chimpanzees are the best studied of the great apes. They are our closest living relatives, and share with us similar ages of terminal female fertility. Yet, unlike humans, chimpanzees become decrepit with age during their fertile years and rarely survive them--even in captivity. The effects of this general physiological senescence on ovarian function in the common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) have been understudied. Although chimpanzees and humans experience very similar patterns and mechanisms of ovarian cycling during most of the fertile years, we know very little of age-mediated reproductive endocrine changes through the late thirties and beyond. The proposed project seeks to improve the record by collecting and quantifying age-specific endocrine data along the chimpanzee hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis for comparison with published data on humans. The HPO axis is a regulatory system acting between the brain and the ovaries that is subject to age-mediated degradation. While changes along the HPO axis in humans--indicated by altered gonadotropin hormone levels--are associated with declining ovarian follicle stocks, many investigators emphasize an active role for the brain as well. The corollary of this interaction is that changes in brain aging that evolved with increased longevity in the human lineage likely have consequences for the physiology of perimenopause. By collecting hormone data in captive chimpanzees, we will improve our understanding of aging in our sister species. Comparing these observations with age-matched data on women will clarify similarities and differences between chimpanzees and humans in age-related cycling dynamics and contribute to understanding distinctive aspects of the perimenopausal experience in our own lineage. perimenopausal experience that evolved in our own lineage.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Rodriguez, Lydia

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Virginia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 17, 2008
Project Title: 
Rodriguez, Lydia, U. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA - To aid research on 'Thinking Gesture: The Dialectics of Language, Gesture, and Thought in Chol Maya,' supervised by Dr. Eve Danziger

LYDIA RODRIGUEZ, then a student at University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, received funding in October 2008 to aid research on 'Thinking Gesture: The Dialectics of Language, Gesture, and Thought in Chol Maya,' supervised by Dr. Eve Danziger. This research investigates the relationship between language, gesture, and thought in a community of Chol Maya speakers of Northern Chiapas, Mexico. It explores the ways in which notions of time are spatialized in speech-accompanying gestures. Most of the existing research on the representation of time in gesture is based on work with 'tense' languages. In all of these studies the fact that time is given a linear representation is noteworthy. This research asks whether such representation of time in gesture is indeed a human universal. Current findings indicate that a linear conceptualization of time is absent in Chol speakers´ gestural repertoire. The co-speech gestures that appear most consistently in Chol discourse are: 1)deictic gestures pointing at real or imaginary locations, and elements in the landscape and the nearby space; 2) iconic gestures depicting shape, size, quantity, and distinctive features of people or mythical characters; 3) gestures occurring in phrases with affectives or positionals. In light of these findings, it is proposed that linearity of imagistic representation of time is not necessarily a universal in human thought. The fact that Chol main grammatical strategy to indicate temporal reference is aspect, and not tense, may account for this lack of linearity in Chol temporal thought.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$24,710

Hallin, Kristin A.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Wisconsin, Madison, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 3, 2001
Project Title: 
Hallin, Kristin A., U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI - To aid research on 'Paleoclimate During Neandertal and Modern Human Occupation in Israel: Tooth Enamel Stable Isotope Evidence,' supervised by Dr. Margaret J. Schoeninger

Publication credit:

Hallin, Kristin A., Margaret J. Schoeninger, and Henry P. Schwarcz. 2012. Paleoclimate during Neandertal and Anatomically Modern Human Occupation at Amud and Qafzeh, Israel: The Stable Isotope Data. Journal of Human Evolution 62(1):59-73.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$18,280

Wells, E.Christian Christian

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 20, 2001
Project Title: 
Wells, Eric C., Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ - To aid research on 'Communal Feasting and the Social Order at El Coyote, Northwestern Honduras,' supervised by Dr. Ben A. Nelson

ERIC C. WELLS, while a student at Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, received funding in July 2001 to aid research on 'Communal Feasting and the Social Order at El Coyote, Northwestern Honduras,' supervised by Dr. Ben A. Nelson. The 2001-2002 Wenner-Gren Individual Research Grant in Archaeology, 'Communal Feasting and the Social Order at EI Coyote, Northwestern Honduras,' contributed financial support to a doctoral research project aimed at exploring the foundations of social power, expressed in the development of hierarchical social and material relations, in prehispanic Honduran chiefdoms. The study focused on the case of EI Coyote, the Classic period (ca. AD 300-1000) capital settlement of the lower Cacaulapa River Valley in northwestern Honduras. With funds from Wenner-Gren, archaeological data were collected from excavations in and around EI Coyote's main civic-ceremonial plaza to provide information on the range and organization of activities carried out in this space. The underlying assumption is that the practices that occurred in this space are directly related to the ways in which local rulers marshaled political and economic forces within their society and forged alliances with peers in neighboring realms. The nature and distribution of material remains in the plaza and in adjacent spaces, combined with chemical data produced from a multi-element analysis of the plaza's component sediments, indicate that craft manufacture, feasting, and ritual activities were carried out in the environs of the main plaza during the seventh through eleventh centuries. These data suggest that EI Coyote's rulers fashioned social hierarchy by centralizing and appropriating surplus labor during community-wide plaza activities in which feasts and other ritual practices served as inducements for individuals to participate in activities calculated to enhance chiefly productivity and to reinforce chiefly legitimacy.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$10,460

Lopiparo, Jeanne L.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 2, 2001
Project Title: 
Lopiparo, Jeanne L., U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'Household Ceramic Production and Small-Scale Economies in the Terminal Classic Ulua Valley, Honduras,' supervised by Dr. Rosemary A. Joyce - Lita Osmundsen Fellowship

JEANNE L. LOPIPARO, while a student at the University of California in Berkeley, California, was awarded the Lita Osmundsen Fellowship in January 2001 to aid research on household ceramic production and small-scale economies in the Terminal Classic Ulúa Valley, Honduras, under the supervision of Dr. Rosemary A. Joyce. Through fine-grained excavation and analysis of Terminal Classic household sites in the lower Ulúa Valley, Lopiparo documented the dispersed production of fine-paste ceramic artifacts and examined the implications of small-scale production for processes of social integration. The incorporation of locally produced, mold-made ceramic artifacts into rituals of renewal at multiple scales provided evidence of a ritual mode of production for the integration of independent house societies. Stylistic analysis of these artifacts demonstrated how participation in shared production practices both expressed commonalities and established distinctions among households, communities, and regions. Lopiparo advanced a model for the ritual mode of production that suggested the means of integration through which societies were produced and reproduced at the local level in the absence of the sociopolitical and economic centralization characteristic of Classic-period centers in the Maya lowlands. As nexuses for rituals that were fundamental to social production and reproduction, house societies were instrumental in the crafting of society in the Terminal Classic Ulúa Valley.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$19,660

Cabatingan, Lee Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 6, 2011
Project Title: 
Cabatingan, Lee Elizabeth, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'The Caribbean Court of Justice: International Pursuits and National Promises in a Regional Court' supervised by Dr. Stephan Palmie

LEE E. CABATINGAN, then a student at University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, was awarded funding in October 2011 to aid research on 'The Caribbean Court of Justice: International Pursuits and National Promises in a Regional Court,' supervised by Dr. Stephan Palmie. Based on participant-observation, interviews, and archival research at the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) in Trinidad & Tobago, this project addresses the question of how a newly established legal institution, like the CCJ, works to create its authoritative legal voice. The court is intended to serve many of the independent nation-states of the English-speaking Caribbean, but these states and their publics tend to view the court with hesitation and suspicion. They place the CCJ alongside a history of failed regional experiments. And, the fact that the CCJ promises to cut the last strings of colonialism by replacing the Privy Council in England as the final court of appeal does little to establish its authority for a public that remains devoted to the perceived superiority of British law and order. As a result of its precarious positioning, the CCJ operates anxiously, striving in everything it does, says, signals, or portrays to establish a balance between colonial court-ness, independent Caribbean-ness, regionalism, nationalism, past, future, passion and logical persuasion in order to establish a foothold in the very region it is designed to serve. This dissertation, then, explores the ways in which the CCJ, both through its mudane practices and its extraordinary events, attempts to construct a scaffolding upon which its authoritative legal voice-its jurisdiction-can be perched.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Powell, Dana Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 10, 2007
Project Title: 
Powell, Dana Elizabeth, U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC - To aid research on 'Alternative Power: The Cultural Politics of Development on the Navajo Nation,' supervised by Dr. Dorothy C. Holland

DANA E. POWELL, then a student at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, was awarded funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'Alternative Power: The Cultural Politics of Development on the Navajo Nation,' supervised by Dr. Dorothy C. Holland. This grant supported more than a year of ethnographic research focusing on energy development debates on the Navajo Nation and the broader networks of which it is a part. Contrasting a proposal for a large-scale coal plant with proposals for wind and solar power, this project calls into question claims of 'alternative' energy and the different visions of independence such claims engage. While long-standing extractive industries and newer 'green' technologies on the Nation pose different modes of economic development and engage a diverse range of advocates -- from regional environmental activists, to tribal leaders, to energy entrepreneurs, to financial investors -- the cultural politics of energy development remains contested and embodied in the everyday lives of tribal members. With over one-third of the reservation's homes lacking electricity and an enduring resistance movement to fossil fuel industry among tribal members and regional allies, the question of power is intimate and urgent. The production of power is thus a polyvalent trope for understanding parallels and intersections between generating electricity and strengthening self-governance. Broadly, the research findings suggest that energy development debates create a space of political action, knowledge negotiation, and subject formation.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Gildner, Theresa Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oregon, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2016
Project Title: 
Gildner, Theresa E., U. of Oregon, Eugene, OR - To aid research on 'Life History Tradeoffs Between Testosterone and Immune Function: Testing the Immunocompetence Handicap Hypothesis,' supervised by Dr. J.Josh Snodgrass

Preliminary abstract: This research uses a biocultural approach and anthropological methods to test predicted life history tradeoffs between reproductive effort (measured using testosterone levels and phenotypic masculine traits) and immune function among the Shuar of Ecuador, a forager-horticulturalist group characterized by high parasite load. Human Life History Theory aims to understand how natural selection produces age and context-dependent tradeoffs in resource allocation to different biological functions, and the physiological bases of these allocations and their outcomes. Still, predicted energetic tradeoffs between mating effort and immune function remains poorly tested among contemporary human populations. Debate remains, for example, about the degree to which intra- versus inter-sexual selection have shaped tradeoffs between immunocompetence and the development and maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics (e.g., through the effects of sex hormones like testosterone). Furthermore, to date, no study has examined the relationship between testosterone and immune function in a natural fertility, high pathogen environment (like the Shuar) reflecting conditions more similar to past human populations under which these hypothesized tradeoffs evolved. This project is the first population-based study to test if there is a direct relationship between testosterone profile and parasite load among an indigenous population. The results of this study will provide insights useful for assessing the validity of hypotheses dependent on these data, such as the hypothesis that inter-sexual selection produced female assessment and preference for testosterone-linked masculine traits as an honest signal of male quality because of the immunosuppressant effects of testosterone.

Grant Year: 
2016
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Trever, Lisa Senchyshyn

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 13, 2009
Project Title: 
Trever, Lisa Senchyshyn, Harvard U., Cambridge, MA - To aid research on 'The Agency of Images: Mural Painting and Architectural Sculpture on the North Coast of Peru,' supervised by Dr. Thomas Bitting Foster Cummins

LISA S. TREVER, then a student at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, was awarded funding in October 2009 to aid research on 'The Agency of Images: Muralo Painting and Architectural Sculpture on the North Coast of Peru,' supervised by Dr. Thomas Bitting Foster Cummins. Archaeological and art historical research was carried out at Panamarca, the southernmost Moche (c. 200-800 CE) urban and ceremonial center on the Peruvian north coast. This project was designed to investigate and document the architectural and archaeological contexts of mural paintings known at the site since the 1950s. This fieldwork was successful in re-identifying, excavating, documenting, and conserving all previously known paintings, although some had suffered severe deterioration over time. The project also uncovered several new mural paintings and associated contexts. The corpus of known Moche mural paintings has thus been dramatically expanded. This fieldwork provides the foundation for a dissertation that will advance ancient Andean studies further into spatial analysis of image and architecture, including the phenomenological analysis of how these figurative paintings may have been seen, approached, and experienced within their built environment and how physical evidence of damage, libations, interment, reopening, and later dedicatory acts may demonstrate the ancient reception and memory of these monumental images. The mural paintings of Panamarca were not passive reflections of Moche thought but rather effective participants in ritual performance and in the construction of social memory and political presence on the southern Moche frontier.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$15,000
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