Park, Seo Young

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Irvine, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 17, 2008
Project Title: 
Park, Seo Young, U. of California, Irvine, CA - To aid research on 'Making Time in the 24-hour City: Gender, Labor, and Experiment in Seoul's Dongdaemun Market,' supervise by Dr. William Michael Maurer

SEO YOUNG PARK, then a student at University of California, Irvine, California, received a grant in October 2008 to aid research on 'Making Time in the 24-hour City: Gender, Labor, and Experiment in Seoul's Dongdaemun Market,' supervise by Dr. William Maurer. This project investigates the ways in which time is experienced and produced by differently positioned subjects in the Dongdaemun Market in Seoul. By exploring the place-making and market-making practices that 'speed up' and also 'slow down' the time in the Market, this research aims to understand the contested emergence of 24-hour cities in Korea. A sprawling complex that encompasses assembly plants, wholesale stores, retail shopping malls, and entertainment centers, dongdaemun exemplifies the rapid transformation of Seoul. Once viewed as a place of arduous manual labor, Dongdaemun is now imagined as an attractive 24-hour operating space, where high-speed transnational production and consumption take place simultaneously. The grantee conducted 15 months of ethnographic fieldwork in Seoul, working with the market-making agents of Dongdaemun: factory laborers, designers, entrepreneurs, and NGO workers. By investigating their practices in and narratives of Dongdaemun, this study analyzes how intimate circuits unfold in their struggles over time, their working spaces, and their own creativity in various registers of garment making. The project suggests that it is not only the workers' intensive labor but also their bodily presence and intimate engagement with the clothes, people, and skills that materialize the 'speed' of production and circulation and yet contest the abstract notion of speed.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$20,130

Folch, Christine

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Hunter College, City U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2008
Project Title: 
Folch, Christine, City U. of New York - Graduate Center, New York, NY - To aid research on 'Territory Matters in the Triple Frontera: Geographic Imaginary, Identity, and the Paraguayan State,' supervised by Dr. Marc Edelman

CHRISTINE FOLCH, then a student at City University of New York - Graduate Center, New York, New York, was awarded funding in April 2008, to aid research on 'Territory Matters in the Triple Frontera: Geographic Imaginary, Identity, and the Paraguayan State,' supervised by Dr. Marc Edelman. Leftist former Bishop Fernando Lugo was able to topple the ruling Colorado Party in Paraguay in April 2008 by channeling discontent over unfulfilled promises, linking these grievances to one issue: Paraguay's hydroelectric dam shared with Brazil, Itaipú Binacional. Criticism of corruption and capitulation to foreign interests in the dam existed from the 1960s, but were dismissed as the complaints of a marginalized left. Four decades later, with the unexpected election of Lugo, these have become the chief diplomatic target of a government -- an issue supported by the left and the right. These changes portend a redefinition in the obligation of 'state' to 'nation' as stitched together in territory and development. 'Territory Matters' traces the course of this transformation and its outcomes-high-level renegotiations with Brazil, the redirection of millions of dollars in Paraguay-to show that what can be seen in the struggles over Itaipú is the reconfiguration of the Paraguayan nation-state. This historical ethnography is drawn from ethnographic data from unparalleled access to leaders in Lugo's government (as they negotiated with Brazil and administered the dam) and observation with popular social movements as they mobilized for 'hydroelectric sovereignty,' as well as rich archival evidence from the Stroessner-era secret police found in the Archives of Terror in Asunción.

Publication Credit:

Folch, Christine. 2013. Surveillance and State Violence in Stroessner's Paraguay: Itaipú Hydroelectric Dam, Archive of Terror. American Anthropologist 115(1):44-57.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$19,924

Stubbs, Matilda Lynn

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Northwestern U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 22, 2014
Project Title: 
Stubbs, Matilda, Northwestern U., Evanston, IL - To aid research on 'Documenting Lives: The Material and Social Life of the Case File in the U.S. Foster Care System,' supervised by Dr. Helen Schwartzman

MATILDA STUBBS, then a graduate student at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, was awarded a grant in April 2014, to aid research on 'Documenting Lives: The Material and Social Life of the Case File in the U.S. Foster Care System,' supervised by Dr. Helen Schwartzman. This dissertation research explores the material and social life of case records in the U.S. foster care system. From 2014-2015, archival and ethnographic fieldwork was conducted to bring attention to the ways that-within this network of bureaucratic settings-lives intermingle with documents and how identities become entangled within the reporting processes of social services, juvenile justice, and court systems. This project demonstrates that the case file-both object and technology-is an important and crucial document in everyday case management. However, its significance has been overlooked and undertheorized due to the tendency for providers and researchers to look through, but not at, the files and records that make up such a large part of everyday life in social service bureaucracies. Research findings demonstrate an overdependence upon the administrative record that reprioritizes case management from direct human service delivery, to meta-documentation practices. That is, documenting recordkeeping activities to comply with routine state audits. This multi-scalar monitoring approach accompanies a downsizing of public services and an increased outsourcing of these programs to private organizations. Through this analysis, the project locates the social implications of these reportage processes on interactions between foster youth, administrators, families, and the delivery of social services.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Karunanithy, Jeyanithe Arumugam

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Edinburgh, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 24, 2008
Project Title: 
Arumugam Karunithy, Jeyanithe, U. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom - To aid research on 'Violence, Trauma, and the Transformation of Personhood/Identity: Sri Lankan Tamils Making Refugee Claims in Canada,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan Robert Spencer

JEYANITHE A. KARUNANITHY, then a student at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, received a grant in December 2008 to aid research on 'Violence, Trauma and the Transformation of Personhood/Identity: Sri Lankan Tamils Making Refugee Claims in Canada,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan Robert Spencer Tamil refugees have spread to all corners of the world as a result of the three decades of civil war and political violence, exacerbated by a 1983 pogrom in Sri Lanka. Tamil refugee claimants have been experiencing tightened immigration control since 9/11, as they hope to find 'refuge' in Canada, their preferred destination. Under the circumstances of refugee and asylum dilemma, this study is designed to explore the paradox of institutional practices of state, refugee law and psychiatric practices (e.g., the discourse and diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), by focusing on its impact upon the process of transformation of personhood. The fieldwork was conducted in the Tamil neighborhoods in Toronto, involving forty in-depth interviews with a group of refugee claimants of Sri Lankan Tamil origin. The data collected on the claimants' experiences of Canadian asylum and strategies of their identity (re)construction will be used to analyze the politics of recollection (memory), interpretation and narrations of the event by using the oral-histories as narrated by asylum-seekers themselves. In other words, the detailed narratives of refugee claimants (which are difficult to narrate and sometimes violate cultural norms), will be analyzed to understand the ways in which the state's practices -- marked by heavy 'bureaucratization' and 'medicalization' -- trigger suffering of refugees who are at the social margins created by the conditions of 'illegality' and 'deportability.'

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$22,420

Ayuandini, Sherria Puteri

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 14, 2013
Project Title: 
Ayuandina, Sherria Puteri, Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid research on 'Restoring Virginity: Hymenoplasty, Value Negotiations, and Sexual Knowledge among Migrant Muslim Women in the Netherlands,' supervised by Dr. John R. Bowen

Preliminary abstract: In many societies, unmarried women must negotiate the tension between premarital sexual desires and social expectations to maintain virginity before marriage (Eich 2010, Buskens 1999, Parla 2001). With recent developments in medical technology and the rise of opportunities for premarital sexual behavior, young women who believe that they no longer possess an intact hymen can now undergo hymenoplasty surgery, which alters the hymen ring to minimize the aperture. While hymenoplasty draws its significance from socially-constructed values of virginity, there is a lack of ethnographic exploration of the phenomenon. Studies on hymenoplasty to date have been primarily conducted by medical researchers who focus on the surgical procedure and doctors' ethical dilemmas. They often assume that the desire for this surgery is evidence of women's oppression. Most ignore the social motivations of the female patients, the intergenerational networks among women of migrant background, and the 'migrant-native' dynamics between the patient and the doctors (Bhugra 1998, Parla 2001). I will investigate the complicated and contradictory social aspects of hymenoplasty as experienced and negotiated by Muslim women patients from migrant background in the Netherlands. The surgery will provide a site to observe the negotiation of sexual values surrounding female virginity between the young women and other members of the community of her background, between the patients, the family, and the doctors, as well as among the doctors themselves, and thereby explore the negotiation of values and of control of sexuality in a pluralistic setting.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$24,010

Newman, Jessica Marie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Yale U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2013
Project Title: 
Newman, Jessica Marie, Yale U., New Haven, CT - To aid research on 'Abortion, Negotiation, and Activism in Morocco,' supervised by Dr. Marcia C. Inhorn

JESSICA M. NEWMAN, then a graduate student at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, was awarded a grant in April 2013 to aid research on 'Abortion, Negotiation, and Activism in Morocco,' supervised by Dr. Marcia C. Inhorn. This two-year dissertation fieldwork project was based in Casablanca and Rabat, Morocco. During the first year of fieldwork (2013-2014), the grantee lived and worked in Casablanca with single mothers collectives while beginning the process of obtaining institutional and ethical approvals to begin research in the maternity hospital in Rabat. It took a year from the time of receiving approval from the hospital in December 2013 to complete necessary review processes for the hospital-based phase of the project. An intervening political scandal surrounding abortion and the firing of one of the project's primary interlocutors delayed access to the hospital until February 2015. Despite this delay, the scandal incited a reopening of the national abortion debate, prompting a series of demonstrations, news articles, and an official debate with the patronage of the Ministry of Health. This greatly contributed to the project, and prompted many interlocutors to share their opinions regarding abortion. King Mohammed VI issued an official request for legal reform projects for the penal codes addressing abortion in March 2015. Thus, the two-phase structure of the project not only allowed the grantee to engage in productive research while managing bureaucratic requirements and obtaining official research permissions, but facilitated an ideal positioning in the capital and at the hospital when public discussions of abortion rekindled. Throughout both phases of the project a total of 109 participants were enrolled: 73 Darija-speaking, 31 French-speaking, and five English-speaking.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Doyle, James Alan

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Brown U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 3, 2010
Project Title: 
Doyle, James Alan, Brown U., Providence, RI - To aid research on 'Planned Monumentality and 'Planted' Settlements in the Preclassic Maya Lowlands,' supervised by Dr. Stephen D. Houston

JAMES ALAN DOYLE, then a student at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, received funding in May 2010, to aid research on 'Planned Monumentality and 'Planted' Settlements in the Preclassic Maya Lowlands,' supervised by Dr. Stephen D. Houston. In this dissertation project, the grantee investigated the origins of ancient Maya civilization at the site of El Palmar, Petén, Guatemala, located in the southern Lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula. Grant funding provided support for one year of field and laboratory research. The dissertation explores the relationship between early monumental architecture, settlement growth, and abandonment in the Preclassic Maya Lowlands. The dissertation will add to the growing body of literature on the emergence of social complexity in the New World, as well as societal 'collapses' and recovery in the Americas and in the global past.

Publication credits:

Doyle, James A., Thomas G. Garrison, and Stephen D. Houston. 2012. Watchful Realms: Integrating GIS Analysis and Political History in the Southern Maya Lowlands. Antiquity 86(333):792-807.

Doyle, James A. 2012. Early Maya Geometric Planning Conventions at El Palmar, Guatemala. Journal of Archaeological Science 40(2): 793-798.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$11,000

Shapero, Joshua Aprile

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Shapero, Joshua Aprile, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Speaking Places: The Grammar of Space and the Sociality of Place among Central Quechua Speakers,' supervised by Dr. Bruce Mannheim

JOSHUA A. SHAPERO, then a graduate student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, was awarded a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'Speaking Places: The Grammar of Space and the Sociality of Place among Central Quechua Speakers,' supervised by Dr. Bruce Mannheim. This project examines patterns of spatial orientation in language and environmental practice in the Rio Negro watershed, in the north-central Peruvian Andes. The study integrated ethnographic, grammatical, and experimental methods to show how speakers of the endangered language, Ancash Quechua, engage their physical environment through language and practice, and how this is changing intergenerationally. Ancash Quechua speakers communicate spatial relations by means of allocentric Frames-of-Reference; in other words, systematically using place-names and local topography, as in 'Juan's house is toward Rio Sawan,' or 'the cup is on the uphill side of the table.' This habitual integration of environmental knowledge with the grammar serves as a mechanism mediating spatial orientation in language and cognition and the cultural patterns of environmental practice that constitute meaningful places, such as seasonal pasturing, the collection of medicinal herbs, and place-bound rituals of healing, divination, and sacrifice. The high grasslands called the puna or hallqa are central here. Pastoralism in this zone has persisted across successive periods of political fragmentation and violence in the last several millenia. This study shows that the persistence of complex patterns of practice such as hallqa pastoralism are not due simply to cultural, economic, or ecological determinants, but to a mutual relationship between environmental practice, language structure, and cognition.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$19,380

Huang, Yu

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Huang, Yu, U. of Washington, Seattle, WA - To aid research on 'Cultivating 'Science-Savvy' Citizens: Empowerment and Risk in Shrimp Aquaculture Development in China,' supervised by Dr. Ann Anagnost

YU HUANG, then a student at University of Washington, Seattle Washington, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'Cultivating 'Science-Savvy' Citizens: Empowerment and Risk in Shrimp Aquaculture Development in China,' supervised by Dr. Ann Anagnost. This research seeks to investigate how, in the context of China's economic reforms, aquaculture has become a site where the state engineers new forms of citizenship to fit the demands of the global economy, and how new forms of subjectivity around empowerment and risk emerge in tension with state projects. While slogans of 'scientific aquaculture' hailed farmers' pursuit of unprecedented high-yields in the 1990s, recently, the focus of science extension has shifted to the promotion of 'healthy aquaculture.' This research traces how scientific aquaculture was produced 'in action' as a result of friction between the state's neoliberal policies, scientists' social aspirations, and farmers' conceptualization of risks. Research sites include stationary sites such as a village dominated by small family farms and a large state-owned collective farm, as well as mobile sites such as science extension activities including fish veterinary training workshops and food safety inspection trips. In addition, the researcher rented a shrimp farm to conduct experimental shrimp farming. Evidence from this project will not only help facilitate more conversations between fishery managers and shrimp farmers, but it will collaborate with both experts and lay people to speculate on the possibilities of new forms of agency in a globalized economy.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$21,871

Mika, Marissa Anne

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pennsylvania, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 11, 2012
Project Title: 
Mika, Marissa Anne, U. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA - To aid research on 'Experimental Infrastructures: Building Cancer Research in Uganda from 1950 to the Present,' supervised by Dr. Steven Feierman

MARISSA A. MIKA, then a graduate student at University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, received a grant in October 2012 to aid research on 'Experimental Infrastructures: Building Cancer Research in Uganda from 1950 to the Present,' supervised by Dr. Steven Feierman. This multi-sited ethnographic project examined the ways in which a new set of research initiatives on HIV-related malignancies are reshaping the landscape of oncology services at the Uganda Cancer Institute. The Institute, a historic site of cancer research and care established in the 1960s, is undergoing rapid changes as it shifts from being 'the place where you were sent to die' to a site of international research excellence. The research phase receiving support examined the ways in which a partnership between a cancer research organization in the United States and the Uganda Cancer Institute is dramatically reshaping the built infrastructure of care and research services. Focusing on the story of two buildings, the project examined the ways in which new facilities and partnerships are displacing and reshaping long established oncology practices that were fundamentally shaped by Uganda's history of crisis, namely civil war and the AIDS epidemic. The project explored the way partners understand the ethics of collaboration, the minutiae of constructing facilities despite vast distances, and the challenges of tearing down old, long established sites in the name of progress. This project examined the political stakes of oncology in the Global South.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$14,100
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