Dygert, Holly A.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 8, 2003
Project Title: 
Dygert, Holly A., Michigan State U., East Lansing, MI - To aid research on 'Negotiating the Indigenous Family in Mexico: Woman, Community, Region and Nation,' supervised by Dr. Laurie K. Medina

HOLLY A. DYGERT, then a student at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, was awarded a grant in May 2003 to aid research on 'Negotiating the Indigenous Family in Mexico: Woman, Community, Region and Nation,' supervised by Dr. Laurie K. Medina. Seventeen months of ethnographic research were conducted for this dissertation research project, with support from the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the Fulbright International Institute of Education/Gracia Robles Program. The research examined ideas about indigenous culture and family among three groups in Mexico: government employees working to implement the National Opportunities Program; Mixtec activists working to revitalize their language and culture; and men and women in the small southern Mixtec village of San Mateo Peñasco. By examining ideas about indigenous culture and family among the three groups, the research aims to better understand how people create, rework, and contest linkages between culture and family in contemporary development practice. The researcher collected and reviewed Opportunities Program literature; conducted interviews with Program officials at national, state, regional and village levels; and participated in and observed Program activities and events at the regional and village levels. Similarly, she collected Mixtec cultural revitalization advocates' written literature; conducted interviews with leading activists; and observed events aimed at revitalizing the Mixtec language and culture. Then, the researcher conducted a year of ethnographic fieldwork in the Mixtec village of San Mateo Peñasco, examining how villagers perceive these ideas about Mixtec culture and families. Data collection methods in the village included: participant observation; a village census; semi-structured interviews with key individuals in the village (including the municipal President, the Catholic priest, and the local midwife); and semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of adult villagers.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$24,037

Tzib, Fernando Maximino

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Wisconsin, Madison, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2008
Project Title: 
Tzib, Fernando Maximino, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI - To aid research on 'Land Tenure Discourses and Mayan Identity in Belize,' supervised by Dr. Frank Salomon

FERNANDO M. TZIB, then a student at University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, was awarded funding in April 2008 to aid research on 'Land Tenure Discourses and Mayan Identity in Belize,' supervised by Dr. Frank Saomon. The study examined the discursive relationship between Maya customary land tenure and Belizean national statutory land tenure systems among the Mopan and Kekchi Maya in southern Belize. Study of Maya claims of rights to lands that Mayas have traditionally occupied and managed through customary land tenure systems demonstrates strong relationships between land tenure and Maya political and socio-economic structures and daily relations with the land and annual events such as ceremonies and festivals. These relationships with the land, the spirit world, the Government of Belize, and the Development Agencies also shape the construction of Maya identity. During conflicts over land use with the Belizean state, it was clear that Maya customary law is also constituted through broader networks of interactions with the state and the spiritual wor1fi. Tuulak in Kekchi and pulyah in Mopan are terms for a form of punishment that befalls a wrongdoer, a construct that reinforces the proscriptions of customary law. This construct is given weight by its perceived links with the ancient Maya, credited by both Mayas and non-Maya. Its temporally transcendent nature strengthens contemporary Mayan identity albeit at the cost of fomenting some social fears.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$12,290

Johnson, Caley Anne Szewczak

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Graduate Center, City U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 23, 2014
Project Title: 
Johnson, Caley Anne Szewczak, City U. of New York, Graduate Center, NY - To aid research on 'Baboon Diet in the Forest and Savanna: An Intraspecific Comparison of Nutritional Goals,' supervised by Dr. Jessica Rothman

Preliminary abstract: As early hominins left the forest and forged life on the savanna, they fed in increasingly open habitats and their diets diversified, especially in the Pleistocene. Pressures from foraging in this new environment are linked with a suite of changes since our last common ancestor with apes, including bipedalism and increased brain size. Available foods were different than those in the forest with less woody and herbaceous foods and more grass resources. It is hypothesized that early humans had little fat and carbohydrates in their diet and more protein. These changes in nutrition for Plio-Pleistocene hominins may have been necessary for physiological transformations such as a decrease in gut size and increase in brain size. It is also hypothesized that from our evolution on the savanna, modern humans express the propensity to maintain (or prioritize) the intake of protein as opposed to other nutrients. 'Protein leverage' in modern humans may contribute to the obesity crisis - with little evolutionary experience of foods rich in fats and sugars, we tend to overconsume energy and maintain protein intake. In order to test how environment shapes patterns of nutrient prioritization, I will use another living primate, which like humans is known for its ecological and dietary flexibility -- the baboon. The objective of this study is to determine how habitat shapes diet and nutrient priorities of an omnivorous primate. To address this, I will conduct observations of wild baboon feeding, collect foods for nutrient analyses, and employ the Geometric Framework of Nutrition to determine their nutritional priorities in Kibale National Park, Uganda (forest) and Laikipia, Kenya (savanna). This study may shed light on changes in diet and behavior in early human ancestors and the evolution of macronutrient management.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$4,500

Noback, Marlijn Lisanne

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Eberhardt-Karls U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 18, 2011
Project Title: 
Noback, Marlijn Lisanne, Eberhard Karls U., Tubingen, Germany - To aid research on 'Climate- and Diet-related Variation in Human Functional Cranial Components,' supervised by Dr. Katerina Harvati

MARLIJN NOBACK, then a student at Eberhard Karls University, Tubingen, Germany, was awarded a grant in April 2011 to aid research on 'Climate- and Diet-Related Variation in Human Functional Cranial Components,' supervised by Dr. Katerina Harvati. This study seeks to elucidate the physiological basis of craniofacial variation and the selective forces driving modern human cranial geographic diversity. Funding enabled the CT scanning of 45 individual crania from three different collections based in Paris, London, and Tübingen. These scans form part of a larger database of over 330 CT scans, representing populations from different climatic and dietary regimes. With the use of the software package AVIZO and a high performance laptop, 3D models of functional facial components are developed from the CT scans. Analyses are currently undertaken and include studies of variation and co-variation of the cranial components and their relation to diet and climate. This project will enhance understanding of the biological processes underlying the evolution of modern human anatomy, adaptation and geographic diversity.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$18,060

Cunningham, Jerimy J.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
McGill U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 22, 2002
Project Title: 
Cunningham, Jerimy J., McGill U., Montreal, Canada - To aid research on 'Ceramic Consumption in the Inland Niger Delta: An Ethnoarchaeological Study,' supervised by Dr. Bruce G. Trigger

JERIMY J. CUNNINGHAM, while a student a McGill University in Montreal, Canada, received an award in February 2002 to aid ethnoarchaeological research on ceramic consumption in the inland Niger delta of Mali, under the supervision of Dr. Bruce G. Trigger. Cunningham investigated the exchange of ceramic vessels in the Djenne region both as a function of economic processes and as a reflection of consumption. In the first phase of the project, 124 potters located within a thirty-kilometer radius of the town of Djenne were interviewed about the economic and social contexts of their production and marketing strategies. In the second phase, one hundred consumer households were randomly selected from a region twenty kilometers in radius, centered on Djenne. The primary buyers of ceramic, plastic, aluminum, and enameled vessels were interviewed regarding their 'tastes' for specific objects, and a census was taken of all household containers. Census data were recorded for 1,829 vessels, including type of vessel, where it was purchased, the identity of the purchaser, the vessel's age, the type of exchange, and the object's location in the house. Cunningham's findings underscored the complex processes that affected the movement of household vessels on a regional scale. In particular, the data showed the complex ways in which ceramic production and marketing, and women's consumption of ceramic, plastic, aluminum, and enameled containers, related to gendered systems of exploitation among the region's patrilineal households.

Publication Credits:

Cunningham, Jerimy J. 2003. Rethinking Style in Archaeology' pp. in Essential Tensions in Archaeological Method and Theory (Eds. Todd L. VanPool and Christine S. VanPool), University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.

Cunningham, Jerimy, J. 2003. Transcending the ?Obnoxious Spectator?: A Case for Prossesual Pluralism in Ethnoarchaeology. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 22:389-410.

Cunningham, Jerimy J., 2009. Pots and Political Economy: Enamel-Wealth, Gender, and Patriarchy in Mali. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 15(2):276-294.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Steele, Ian Emmet

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2014
Project Title: 
Steele, Ian Emmet, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'Gifts with the State: Reciprocity, Solidarity and Corruption in Egypt's Province of the Presidents,' supervised by Dr. Charles Hirschkind

Preliminary abstract: Since Egypt's 2011 revolution, scholars have noted the seeming paradox between revolt against state corruption and adulation of elements of Egypt's 'deep state' through slogans like, 'The people, the army, and the police are one hand.' Rather than assuming an opposition between revolution and panegyric, this research project will investigate the cultivation solidarity with the Egyptian state through the very corruptions criticized by revolutionaries. Situated in a rural Nile Delta province infamous for receiving patronage because of its close relationship to Egypt's deep state, this twelve month ethnographic project will ask how exchange of favors through connections, or 'wasta,' binds and subordinates Egyptians to state authorities, drawing on and advancing anthropological literatures on reciprocity and obligation, solidarity and authority, and corruption. Most recent ethnographies of Egypt have focused on Cairo to the detriment of rural provinces where most Egyptians live, but by focusing on micropractices of nepotism at a local level, this study will help reveal the affective infrastructures that support the Egyptian state.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$19,940

High, Mette M.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cambridge, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 3, 2005
Project Title: 
High, Mette M., U. of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK - To aid 'A Study of Gold Mining, Pastoralism, and Changing Working Lives in Rural Mongolia,' supervised by Dr. Caroline Humphrey

METTE M. HIGH, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, received funding in January 2006 to aid research on 'A Study of Gold Mining, Pastoralism and Changing Working Lives in Rural Mongolia', supervised by Prof. Caroline Humphrey. The research objectives were to understand the practical and cosmological issues that arise for pastoralists when mining comes to occupy a visible social and physical space and presents them with new subsistence opportunities. Fieldwork consisted of 10 months' participant observation and interviews with people who are taking part in the current gold rush as well as herders who distance themselves from the environmentally damaging mining practices. By examining narratives about industrialization and collectivization in the socialist era as well as the recent advent of the gold rush, the research concerned how notions of collectivity, responsibility and individualism were related to transformational historical processes and changing subsistence economies. Focusing on how people reconcile cosmological concepts related to the landscape with working practices that transgress fundamental taboos about the underground and water resources, moral commentaries and discourses of fear and suspicion highlighted people's negotiation of status and social interaction. The research demonstrates that emerging subsistence economies may not only be fuelled by economic incentives but also by particular socio-cultural mechanisms.

Publication Credits:

High, Mette M. 2013. Polluted Money, Polluted Wealth: Emerging Regimes of Value in the Mongolian Gold Rush. American Ethnologist 40(4):676-688.

High, Mette M. 2013. Cosmologies of Freedom and Buddhist Self-Transformation in the Mongolian Gold Rush. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 19(4):753-770.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$8,750

Michaels, Ben Justin

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Indiana U., Bloomington
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 3, 2010
Project Title: 
Michaels, Ben Justin, Indiana U., Bloomington, IN - To aid research on 'Team Tibet: Soccer as the Performance of Human Rights in the Transnational Tibetan Exile Community,' supervised by Dr. Marvin Sterling

BEN J. MICHAELS, then a student at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, received a grant in May 2010 to aid research on 'Team Tibet: Soccer as the Performance of Human Rights in the Transnational Tibetan Exile Community,' supervised by Dr. Marvin Sterling. For this phase of research, ethnographic fieldwork was carried out in Dharamsala/Mcleod Ganj, India, which is the seat of the Tibetan Government in Exile and the major hub of Tibetan exile life. 2011 became a historic year for the transnational Tibetan exile community as the Dalai Lama announced his retirement from political life and handed over leadership of the Tibetan Government in Exile to an elected prime minister. This marked the next major step in the materialization of his long-envisioned process of Tibetan democratization and emboldened a new generation of politically active Tibetans to embrace their democratic right to disagree with their leaders. Acknowledging dissent as an essential element of the democratic process, this study examines the social mechanisms by which dissenting opinions are either muted at the local level or propagated and allowed to evolve into transnational social movements able to transcend spatial and political boundaries. At the same time, this research highlights some of the generational gaps in social and political views as young Tibetans, raised and educated in exile, use the emergence of new and globally accessible communicative media to express and circulate new ideas throughout the Tibetan world.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$8,150

Carothers, Courtney

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 5, 2005
Project Title: 
Carothers, Courtney, U. of Washington, Seattle, WA - To aid research on 'Sociocultural Effects of Privatizing Marine Resources in the North Pacific,' supervised by Dr. Eric A. Smith

COURTNEY CAROTHERS, then a student at the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, received funding in July 2005 to aid research on 'Sociocultural Effects of Privatizing Marine Resources in the North Pacific,' supervised by Dr. Eric A. Smith. This study explores the sociocultural impacts of the privatization of fishing rights on Alaska Native fishing villages. Ethnographic research in three remote coastal villages on Kodiak Island suggests that the privatization of fisheries access is a primary factor contributing to a fundamental change in the lifestyle on the island. Within the last decade village populations have decreased by approximately 50%, fishermen and their 'fishing power' (e.g. vessels, crews, permits, and quotas) have decreased substantially, and young people have started growing up without fishing knowledge or a fishing identity. Initial analysis of the fishing quota market, extensive fishery participant survey data, and ethnographic research suggest that community residence, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity play an important role in explaining the variation in the effects of resource access privatization. Cultural factors, such as the importance of a 'maintaining' rather than an 'accumulating' economy, appear to influence decision-making in privatized access fisheries. Other factors, including economic declines in mainstay salmon fisheries, geographic isolation from markets, increased cost of living have also contributed to loss of fishing power in Kodiak villages. This study also explores community ownership of fishing rights as a mitigation measure against some of the negative impacts of resource privatization.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$24,641

Schwoerer, Tobias

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Zurich, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 18, 2005