Valles, Dario

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Northwestern U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 15, 2013
Project Title: 
Valles, Dario, Northwestern U., Evanston, IL - To aid research on 'Provedoras Unidas: Latina Migrant Family Child Care Providers Negotiating Poverty, Power & Organized Labor in Neoliberal Los Angeles,' supervised by Dr. Micaela di Leonardo

Preliminary abstract: The growth of a feminized global service sector, intersecting with the move from welfare to 'workfare' in the U.S., has engendered a 'child care crisis' where demand for care has skyrocketed while costs have outpaced rents in most states. In response, family child care (FCC) has become one of the fastest growing occupations in the U.S., with an estimated 2.3 million workers and many more working informally, providing alternatives to institutionalized daycare hours, cost and access. Like the low-income women they serve, U.S. FCC providers are predominantly Latina and black women; in Los Angeles, they are primarily recent migrants from Mexico and Central America. I propose to study Latina migrant family child care providers in Los Angeles and the ways in which they negotiate the contradictions among market demands for 'flexible' and cheap care, increased regulatory surveillance by government and racialized and gendered ideas of 'good motherhood' and 'proper families'. Joining a growing trend across the U.S., family child care workers in California have attempted to gain legal recognition as a union, yet face opposition from left- and right- leaning legislators alike. I will examine family child care union organizing alongside providers' daily experiences to understand the historical political-economic factors and racialized and gendered structures shaping Latina migrant women's participation in family child care. At the same time, I hope to uncover how Latina family child care providers �' in their everyday practices and collective action �' create new spaces of 'conviviality,' where migrant groups and marginalized workers craft new forms of political and social life in urban landscapes reconfigured by transnational flows and neoliberal globalization

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$22,823

Kiel, Michelle Lea

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Florida, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 30, 2007
Project Title: 
Kiel, Michelle Lea, U. of Florida, Gainesville, FL - To aid research on 'Experts and the Subjects of Expertise: Education and Development in Madagascar,' supervised by Dr. Brenda Chalfin

MICHELLE L. KIEL, then a student at University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, received funding in October 2007 to aid research on 'Experts and the Subjects of Expertise: Education and Development in Madagascar,' supervised by Dr. Brenda Chalfin. As developing nations attempt to align their development policies to neoliberal ideology and the goals of international organizations, rural development projects are woven into new and dynamic relationships with the communities they serve, partner agencies, and state institutions. This research investigated: 1) how international agendas and agencies, working with the state, structure the implementation of development projects aimed at influencing rural development through education and training; 2) how this interaction influences the content of agricultural knowledge; and 3) how social inequality is affected by these relationships. Fieldwork focused on two rural development projects in the region of Atsinanana, Madagascar, from July 2008 to March 2009. Ethnographic research was conducted among rural inhabitants, project participants, instructors and administrators, and the representatives of partner organizations. Preliminary findings suggest that inter-organizational partnerships encourage the standardization of agricultural knowledge, however their influence over individual programs tends to be partial. While the projects promote agricultural knowledge, the material and symbolic benefits of knowledge tend to be reserved for elite actors. The projects themselves are contingent on the ability of project administrators to master certain expert practices while aligning the projects themselves to the changing discourses of governmental and international organizations.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$19,138

Andrushko, Valerie A.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Barbara, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 18, 2005
Project Title: 
Andrushko, Valerie A., U. of California, Santa Barbara, CA -To aid 'The Origins and Impact of the Inca State: A Bioarchaeological Investigation of the Cuzco Valley,' supervised by Dr. Phillip L. Walker

VALERIE A. ANDRUSHKO, while a student at University of California., Berkeley, California, received funding in May 2005 to aid research on 'The Origins and Impact of the Inca State: A Bioarchaeological Investigation of the Cuzco Valley,' supervised by Dr. Phillip L. Walker. This dissertation project investigates the biological impacts of the Inca Empire in the capital region of Cuzco. With funds from the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the final phase of dissertation research-featuring analysis of 78 prehistoric burials-was completed in Cuzco, Peru. Burials from two sites, the pre-Inca site of Ccotoccotuyoc and the elite Inca site of Sacsahuaman, were analyzed for data on demography, stress indicators, and trauma. These data were combined with nine other Cuzco sites-yielding a sample size of 855 individuals-to gain a comprehensive understanding of the health consequences of Inca consolidation. In addition, chemical analyses were completed for information on prehistoric migration and diet. Specifically, isotopic analyses of strontium, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen were conducted on teeth from 59 individuals buried at the site of Chokepukio. The results from this phase of the dissertation project confirm that the Inca Empire significantly altered the lives of people under their domain. Paleopathological analyses indicate that local populations were affected biologically through settlement aggregation and heightened conflict. Furthermore, strontium and oxygen isotope data reveal that foreign individuals were relocated to the Cuzco Valley during Inca times, while differences in carbon and nitrogen isotopes reflect imperially-induced dietary changes.

Publication Credits:

Andrushko, Valerie A., and Elva C. Torres. 2011. Skeletal Evidence for Inca Warfare from the Cuzco Region of Peru. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 146(3):361-372.

Andrushko, Valerie A., Michele R. Buzon, Antonion Simonetti, and Robert A. Creaser. 2009 Strontium Isotope Evidence for Prehistoric Migration at Chokepukio, Valley of Cuzco, Peru. Latin American Antiquity 20(1):57-75.

Andrushko, Valerie A., and John W. Verano. 2008. Prehistoric Trepanation in the Cuzco Region of Peru: A View into an Ancient Andean Practice. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 137(1):4-13

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$21,650

Otu, Edwin Kwame

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Syracuse U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 21, 2013
Project Title: 
Otu, Edwin Kwame, Syracuse U., Syracuse, NY - To aid research on 'Reluctantly Queer: Sassoi, and the Shifting Paradigms of Masculinity and Sexual Citizenship in Postcolonial Ghana,' supervised by Dr. Susan Snow Wadley

Preliminary abstract: My dissertation research will explore the ongoing transformations in understandings about masculinity and sexual citizenship in postcolonial Ghana. In the early decades of the 21st century, Ghana has witnessed several shifts in understandings about gender and sexuality, such as the reduction of effeminacy to homosexuality. These transformations, wrought by the increasing visibility of same-sex politics in postcolonial Africa and the increasing pseudo-homophobia of the nation-state, inform the background of the lives of self-identified effeminate men, known in local parlance as sassoi. Not a unified whole, sassoi experiences and sensibilities are shaped by their multiple orientations. Sassoi heterogeneity is therefore contingent on their ethnicity, class, educational level, and the degree to which they embrace particular heteronormative ideas and practices, such as marriage, fatherhood, and socially acceptable markers of being. Central to this thesis is the idea of, and perhaps the practice of reluctance. How might sassoi be reluctantly queer subjects, and what aspects of their lives might shape their refusal of the reducibility of effeminacy to homosexuality? Combining life narratives, observant participation, discourse analysis, and archival research, I will explore how sassoi remake their identities as effeminate subjects in this era of global LGBTQ politics and growing political homophobia in Ghana.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$16,550

Drah, Bright Bensah

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Toronto, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 17, 2008
Project Title: 
Drah, Bright Bensah, U. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada - To aid research on 'Crisis Fostering in an Age of HIV/AIDS: Experiences of Queen Mothers of Manya Krobo, Ghana,' supervised by Dr. Daniel W. Sellen

BRIGHT BENSAH DRAH, then a student at University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, received a grant in November 2008 to aid research on 'Crisis Fostering in an Age of HIV/AIDS: Experiences of Queen Mothers of Manya Krobo, Ghana,' supervised by Dr. Daniel W. Sellen. About 170,000 Ghanaian children are orphaned due to AIDS, 80 percent of whom are fostered by women. Existing research about orphan care has focused on the woman-child dyad, thereby obscuring other forms of care. Moreover, the conventional measures of orphan care are based on frameworks that ignore orphans' perspectives and the social context in which caregiving is negotiated. In the Lower and Upper Manya Krobo districts in Ghana's Eastern Region, queen mothers (traditional female leaders) are responsible for orphans. The aims of the current study are to examine: 1) the socio-cultural context of orphan care in Manya Krobo; 2) caregiving strategies used by the queen mothers; and 3) the outcomes for orphans. Between September 2008 and December 2009, data were collected from queen mothers, children 6-11 years old, chiefs, HIV-infected/uninfected adults, welfare officers and NGOs using qualitative and quantitative methods, including focus groups, semi-structured interviews, structured interviews, and participant observation in households. Data collected included participants' understandings and expressions of care, child/orphan and caregiving practices. Analysis and manuscript preparation are expected to be complete by June 2010. Findings will address existing gaps in anthropological theory of community based child caregiving and contribute to improving orphan care in Ghana and internationally.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$21,604

Su, Anne

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Stony Brook, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 20, 2008
Project Title: 
Su, Anne, Stony Brook U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'The Functional Morphology of Subchondral and Trabecular Bone in the Hominid Hindfoot,' supervised by Dr. Brigitte Demes

ANNE SU, then a student at Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, received a grant in October 2008, to aid research on 'The Functional Morphology of Subchondral and Trabecular Bone in the Hominid Hindfoot,' Supervised by Dr. Brigitte Demes. Previous studies of the external morphology fossil hominin hindfoot bones have revealed unique mosaics of ape-like and human-like features that have complicated locomotor reconstruction of these extinct individuals. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the internal morphology (subchondral and trabecular bone) of these skeletal elements hold a diagnostic locomotor signal that may help to further characterize the nature of this mosaicism. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) images of associated hominoid hindfoot bones were obtained and morphological properties of the subchondral cortical and trabecular bone were quantified. Preliminary analyses indicate that in the human tibiotalar joint, the greatest subchondral cortical bone thickness and radio density, and trabecular bone volume and thickness were found in regions that agree with those that are in greatest compression during the push-off phase of the gait cycle, coinciding with the time of peak load. Furthermore, the regions within the joint exhibiting these relative indicators of bone strength differ among the hominoid species. The study of how these differences relate to habitual locomotor differences is ongoing, as well as investigation into patterns of the degree and direction of trabecular anisotropy and their relation to habitual ankle posture.

Publication Credit:

Su, Anne, Ian J. Wallace, and Masato Nakatsukasa. 2013. Trabecular Bone Anisotropy and Orientation in an Early Pleistocene Hominin Talus from East Turkana, Kenya. Journal of Human Evolution 64(6):667-677.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$13,175

Itzhak, Nofit

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, San Diego, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 9, 2013
Project Title: 
Itzhak, Nofit, U. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA - To aid research on 'Negotiating the Politics and Ethics of Compassion: Christian Humanitarianism in Rwanda and France,' supervised by Dr. Thomas J. Csordas

Preliminary abstract: How do persons engaged in Christian humanitarianism become invested in this particular form of social action? What kinds of subjectivities and modes of social relatedness are created in the course of this practice? And how are emotions of care, such as love, compassion, empathy and sympathy, implicated in these processes? This project seeks to answer these questions through an ethnographic study of a Catholic charismatic humanitarian NGO in Rwanda and France. Specifically, it investigates the manners in which Christian aid workers negotiate the tensions between the humanitarian position, as one based on hierarchy and a bestowing of benevolence, and their religio-ethical ideals, which compel them to establish a relationship with aid recipients that is based on equality and fellowship. Having to inhabit this paradoxical position, and being acutely aware of it, Christian aid workers constantly reflect on the operation of emotions of care, attempt to cultivate them, and try to negotiate the tensions between what allows or hinders their flourishing in the course of humanitarian practice and interaction. By investigating the two interrelated levels through which emotions of care shape and drive Christian humanitarian action -- that of discourse, as the ethical foundation of humanitarian practice, and that of embodiment, as the interpersonal processes through which emotions of care become experientially real for people in the course of interaction -- this project will contribute to a more nuanced understanding of contemporary intersections between humanitarianism, religion, and ethics, as well as the interaction between culture, sociality, and emotions of care.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$24,520

Moumtaz, Nada

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Graduate Center, City U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Moumtaz, Nada, City U. of New York, Graduate Center, New York, NY - To aid research on 'Piety in Markets of Inalienable Property: An Anthropology of Waqf, Beirut 1826 - present,' supervised by Dr. David W. Harvey

NADA MOUMTAZ, then a student at The City University of New York Graduate Center, New York, New York, received a grant in September 2007 to aid research on 'Piety in Markets of Inalienable Property: An Anthropology of Waqf, Beirut 1826-Present,' supervised by Prof. David Harvey. Waqf is one of the most enduring economic and religious institutions in the Muslim world. Dominant until the 19th century, waqf was discarded as inalienable (and hence 'precapitalist') during the property reforms of the first half of the 20th century. Since the 1990s and coinciding with the Islamic Revival and its emphasis on pious Muslim subjects, inalienable waqf is undergoing a revival. For 16 months, the researcher carried out ethnographic and archival research to investigate how inalienables (here waqfs), and the regime of value they embody, intersect with a private property regime. The grantee collected founding documents, accounting, appointments, and disputes around waqfs in 19th-century Beirut. She also recorded oral histories of three waqfs, and interviewed contemporary waqf makers. Evidence confirms that inalienables are not eliminated with the passage to market economies and private-property regimes, questioning the depiction of capitalism as a commodity economy and transition to capitalism as a withering of gift economies. Results indicate that inalienables are disciplined according to the moral order of the new property regime -- as well as to the characteristics of the moral subject, her/his duties, and the sites of morality -- without nonetheless eradicating the old moral order.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$24,928

Craze, Joshua

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 13, 2011
Project Title: 
Craze, Joshua. U. of California, Berkeley CA - To aid research on 'At the Edge of the Territory: Disputes along the South Sudan Border,' supervised by Dr. Paul Rabinow.

JOSHUA CRAZE, then a graduate student at University of California, Berkeley, California, received a grant in April 2011 to aid research on 'At the Edge of the Territory: Disputes along the South Sudan Border,' supervised by Dr. Paul Rabinow. This research project analyzed the dynamics of conflict and territory in the contested area of Abyei, Sudan/South Sudan. Two groups principally inhabit the area. The transhumant Misseriya, who move their cattle south through the region in the dry season, feared that if Abyei were to join the nascent nation-state of South Sudan, their access to vital grazing pastures would be limited. The Ngok Dinka, the principal residents of the region, claim that Abyei is their ancestral homeland, and that the Misseriya have no residency rights in the area at all. Both groups made maximal territorial claims to once flexible areas of pastoralist grazing. Analyzing this conflict, research shows how discussions of borders by both groups have become part of a state discourse that is selectively taken up and used by both state and non-state actors. The dialectic at play on the borders of Abyei is one in which non-state concerns are transformed into the language of the state, and the Sudanese state uses non-state actors to deliberately obscure the borders of the territory.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Shankar, Shobana

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 4, 2001
Project Title: 
Shankar, Shobana, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'Wards and Workers: Christianity, Agency, and Social Mobility in Muslim, Hausa Society, 1899 to Present,' supervised by Dr. Edward A. Alpers
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$7,000