Girard, William Maurice

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Cruz, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 17, 2008
Project Title: 
Girard, William Maurice, U. of California, Santa Cruz, CA - To aid research on 'Speaking in Modern Tongues: Evangelical Christianity, Development, and Indigeneity in Copán Ruinas, Honduras,' supervised by Dr. Susan F. Harding

WILLIAM M. GIRARD, then a student at University of California, Santa Cruz, California, received a grant in October 2008 to aid research on 'Speaking in Modern Tongues: Evangelical Christianity, Development, and Indigeneity in Copán Ruínas, Honduras,' supervised by Dr. Susan F. Harding. This project examines how Pentecostal churches in Copán Ruínas, Honduras, are recrafting the discourses and practices of development, positioning themselves-rather than the Honduran state or translocal NGOs-as the agents capable of fulfilling the long-promised dream of national progress. This research also investigates how this project of national development is articulated in conjunction with a discourse of race and ethnicity. Copán Ruinas is a particularly productive place to carry out such research because of both the vibrant Maya-Chortí indigenous movement found in the region and its proximity the Mayan ruins of Copán, a key site in the construction of mestizaje -- a hegemonic vision of both national and racial/ethnic identity that maintains that all Hondurans are the descendants of both the Spanish and Maya. Resulting from a year of fieldwork, research findings suggest that Pentecostal Christians in Copán Ruinas employ three closely related but distinct world making projects in order to attain greater levels of prosperity and to combat progress-hindering demonic forces, which they believe are alive in the Maya-Chortí indigenous movement and in the space that surrounds the Mayan ruins. These three projects are conversion, spiritual warfare, and the utilization of the 'law of the harvest.'

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$20,064

Welker, Marina Andrea

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 9, 2001
Project Title: 
Welker, Marina, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Industry as Aid: Mining, Development, and Moral Conflict in Sumbawa, Indonesia,' supervised by Dr. Webb Keane

MARINA WELKER, while a student at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, received funding in November 2001 to aid research on mining, development, and moral conflict in Sumbawa, Indonesia, under the supervision of Dr. Webb Keane. Welker considered the incorporation of a new business paradigm, 'corporate social responsibility' (CSR), in the transnational mining industry. During eighteen months of data collection in Indonesia, she combined long-term village research on community development projects carried out by Newmont Nusa Tenggara near the Batu Hijau copper and gold mine in Sumbawa with two months of comparative research in Jakarta and at other mine sites. Primary methods included participant observation, interviews, and archival research (corporate documents and newspapers). Welker focused on transformations in the risk management strategies mining companies applied to groups they recognized as 'stakeholders': farmers, businesspeople, mothers, the state, developmentalist nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and advocacy NGOs. She found that under the CSR paradigm, corporations were attempting to substitute a market rationality construing local communities as autonomous and independent for the gift logic that served as the conventional basis of corporate-community relations. By examining how new flows of material and discourse between companies and stakeholders were constituted and contested, Welker approached CSR as an extension of corporate power and knowledge. She found both stakeholder groups and companies transformed through their participation in negotiations over the proper relationship between mining companies and mine-affected communities.

Publication Credits:

Welker, Marina. 2014. Enacting the Corporation: An American Mining Firm in Post-Authoritarian Indonesia. University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles.

Welker, Marina. 2012. The Green Revolution's Ghost: Unruly Subjects of Participatory Development in Rural Indonesia. American Ethnologist 39(2):389-406.

Welker, Marina A. 2009. 'Corporate Security Begins in the Community:' Mining, The Corporate Social
Responsibility Industry, and Environmental Advocacy in Indonesia. Cutlural Anthropology 24(1):142-179.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$15,638

Landry, Timothy Robert

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Urbana, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 13, 2009
Project Title: 
Landry, Timothy Robert, U. of Illinois, Urbana, IL - To aid research on 'Vodun on the Move: Positioning Cultural Traditions through Tourist Encounters in Bénin,' supervised by Dr. Alma Gottlieb

COURTNEY ANNE LEE, then a student at the University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, was awarded a grant in April 2009, to aid research on 'The Impact of Medical Tourism on Health Care in Costa Rica,' supervised by Dr. Stephen Koester. Based on a year of ethnographic fieldwork, this research explores the development of Costa Rica as a medical tourist destination for Americans seeking low cost, high quality medical care. This dissertation project seeks to understand the social, political, economic, and moral implications that the growth of medical tourism -- as a manifestation of larger neoliberal changes in Latin America -- has for the existing socialized health care system in Costa Rica, and the ways in which medical tourism affects how Costa Ricans think about health care delivery and state responsibility for health care. The global medical tourism industry represents a fundamental shift in the way we think about health care provision, and yet its impacts on local health care access remain virtually unexamined. This research addresses the ideological tensions and contradictions that surround medical tourism as the lines between conceptions of health care as local and global, socialist and capitalist, public and private blur to accommodate this emerging industry. This study is one of the first to take seriously local perceptions, understandings, and engagements with medical tourism. Grounded in the experiences of Costa Rican health care providers, educators, policy makers and locals, this paper tells the story of a system in flux.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,979

Baxstrom, Richard B.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Johns Hopkins U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 11, 2001
Project Title: 
Baxstrom, Richard B., John Hopkins U., Baltimore, MD - To aid research on 'Difference and Danger: Brickfields, Tamils and the Emergence of an Alternative Modernity in Malaysia,' supervised by Dr. Veena Das

RICHARD B. BAXSTROM, while a student at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, received funding in December 2001 to aid research on the emergence of an alternative modernity among Tamils in Malaysia, under the supervision of Dr. Veena Das. By undertaking a detailed ethnography of Brickfields, a primarily Malaysian Tamil neighborhood located near the center of Kuala Lumpur, Baxstrom investigated the ways in which the Tamil minority community in Malaysia is concretely produced as, and is the producer of, a discrete subcategory of identity. His approach was to empirically investigate and connect the specific situation of Brickfields Tamils with global processes, Malaysian state power, and the unique trajectory of urban life in Kuala Lumpur, examining the ways in which their identity is produced by the Malaysian state and how the community itself produces its own identities, which simultaneously accommodate and resist the state's agenda.

Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Petruccio, Claudia L.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pittsburgh, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 3, 2005
Project Title: 
Petruccio, Claudia L., U. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA - To aid research on 'Amniocentesis, Cultural Mediation, and the Construction of Difference in Italy,' supervised by Dr. Joseph S. Alter

CLAUDIA L. PETRUCCIO, then a student at University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was awarded a grant in January 2005 to aid research on 'Amniocentesis, Cultural Mediation, and the Construction of Difference in Italy,' supervised by Dr. Joseph S. Alter. This project examined a program in which native speakers of thirty languages facilitate the delivery of culturally competent healthcare to recent immigrants in Florence, Italy. Research was designed to reveal the ways in which culture is defined, represented, and enacted throughout the various administrative and clinical registers of the program, and was focused primarily on a prenatal clinic for Chinese immigrants housed in a center for the practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The researcher attended trainings for cultural mediators, participated in the daily life of prenatal clinics where Arab, Romanian, and Chinese mediators assisted patients, and shadowed a Chinese mediator as she conducted rounds in the prenatal and maternity wards of a large suburban hospital. Interviews were conducted with administrators, doctors, midwives, mediators, and patients to elicit opinions about the meanings of culture and how it relates to the needs of expectant and new immigrant mothers. Particular attention was paid to points of disjuncture in clinical practice, where ideal theories or romanticized versions of culture came into conflict with the legal, material and structural reality of immigrant patients. The women who frequented the clinics described their needs primarily in legal, structural, and economic terms: long working hours and poor conditions, greater need for translation services, and difficulty navigating the bureaucracy of medical and government offices. All of these needs were addressed in daily interactions in the clinic, yet the clinic staff expressed a frustrating incongruity between an idealized Chinese culture, associated with healthful living and a balanced lifestyle, and the often unhealthy circumstances of their immigrant patients.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$22,428

Fiol, Stefan P.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Urbana, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 21, 2004
Project Title: 
Fiol, Stefan P., U. of Illinois, Urbana, IL - To aid research on 'The Politics of Performance and Place among Pahari Musicians in Uttaranchal,' supervised by Dr. Charles Capwell

STEFAN P. FIOL, then a student at University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, received funding in October 2004 to aid research on 'The Politics of Performance and Place among Pahari Musicians in Uttaranchal,' supervised by Dr. Charles Capwell. The dissertation research carried out in Uttaranchal, North India, from November 2004 through September 2005 focused on the formation of a regional music industry, and the influence this has on local musical practices. The nature of my subject matter led me to explore different kinds of contexts in which music is produced, distributed, and consumed, thus necessitating a multi-sited research methodology. I traced the paths of musical consumption, distribution, and production through various villages, hill towns, and plains cities, exploring the historical and social processes through which the regional music of Uttaranchal (Garhwal and Kumaon) becomes codified and reinterpreted by various actors. I hope that this dissertation will be of use to scholars, policy-makers, and artists interested in understanding how commercialization transforms the landscape of musical life in the conext of this newly-formed hill state.

Fiol, Stefan. 2010. Dual Framing: Locating Authenticities in the Music Vide3os of Himalayan Possession Rituals. Ethnomusicology 54(1):28-53.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$7,098

Tookes, Jennifer Lynne Sweeney

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Emory U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2009
Project Title: 
Tookes, Jennifer L. S., Emory U., Atlanta, GA - To aid research on 'Rice and Peas in the Diaspora: Nutrition and Food Choice among Barbadian Immigrants in Atlanta,' supervised by Dr. Peter J. Brown

JENNIFER L.S. TOOKES, then a student at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, was awarded funding in April 2009 to aid research on 'Rice and Peas in the Diaspora: Nutrition and Food Choice among Barbadian Immigrants in Atlanta,' supervised by Dr. Peter J. Brown. Dissertation research investigated how quantities and types of foods consumed, emic meanings of these choices, perceptions of physical activity, body image and body compositions differ between native-English speaking populations in Barbados and migrant Barbadians in the United States. This research ties ethnographic analysis of cultural meaning of food and food change in migration to quantitative research on the physical impacts of that shift, while challenging popular notions of acculturation to American lifestyles in a non-Latino migrant group. This project included the use of extensive participant observation in both the Atlanta area and the island of Barbados, semi- and unstructured interviews with Barbadians in the US and abroad, collection of cultural consensus and consonance data, along with food journals and anthropometric measurements. Ultimately, the data collected during the year's research in both Atlanta and Barbados will provide extensive information on how the topics of food, activity and body image interact to shape people's opinions and behaviors relating to food choice and health across migration.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$13,695

Kashanipour, Ryan Amir

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2007
Project Title: 
Kashanipour, Ryan Amir, U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ - To aid research and on 'A World of Cures: Maya Healing Systems in Colonial Yucatan,' supervised by Dr. Kevin M. Gosner

RYAN KASHANIPOUR, then a student at University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, received funding in May 2007 to aid research on 'A World of Cures: Maya Healing Systems in Colonial Yucatan,' supervised by Dr. Kevin M. Gosner. This project is an ethnohistorical examination of the role of medicine and healing in the eighteenth-century, Spanish Atlantic world. In particular, this project explores the role of healing systems in forging day-to-day connections between diverse social and ethnic groups in colonial Yucatan. These findings demonstrate how native peoples used central components to the human existence -- sickness and health -- to control their own lives and influence the broader colonial society. Funding supported primary source research in archives and libraries in Spain and the United States. Historical sources uncovered in this study -- such as six eighteenth-century manuscript books of medicine written in Yucatec Maya and Spanish -- show the broad series of connections within colonial society based on medicine and healing. These findings, in part, demonstrate that healing practices circulating widely in the colonies. In spite of prohibitions that attempted to limit the interaction between different social groups, natives, European, Africans, and people of mixed ethnicity regularly exchanged medical knowledge. Local healing practices were, therefore, the product of a widespread interaction and exchange. Furthermore, indigenous medicinal practices and knowledge empowered native healing specialists, which served to empower native communities.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,866

Adams, Justin W.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
July 1, 2004
Project Title: 
Adams, Mr. Justin W., Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid research on 'Taphonomic and Paleoecological Factors Influencing Hominid Incorporation at Gondolin and other South African Sites,' supervised by Dr. Glenn C. Conroy

Publication Credit:

Herries, Andy I.R., Justin W. Adams, Kevin L. Kuykendall, and John Shaw. 2006. Speleology and Magnetobiostratigraphic Chronology of the GD 2 Locality of the Gondolin Hominin-Bearing Paleocave Deposits, North West Province, South Africa. Journal of Human Evolution 51(6):617-631.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$13,400