Buck, Caitlin

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cardiff U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 14, 2001
Project Title: 
Buck, Dr. Caitlin, U. of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK - To aid conference on tools for constructing chronologies: crossing disciplinary boundaries, 2002, Newton, Wales, in collaboration with Dr. Andrew Millard
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$2,300

Smith, Claire Edwina

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Flinders U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 22, 2004
Project Title: 
Smith, Dr. Claire E., Flinders U., Adelaide, Australia - To aid WAC Inter-congress on 'The Uses and Abuses of Archaeology for Indigenous Populations,' 2005, Rangataua, New Zealand
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Muller, Birgit

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2009
Project Title: 
Muller, Dr. Birgit, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France - To aid workshop on 'The Anthropology of International Institutions: Mechanisms of Governance,' 2010, EHESS, in collaboration with Dr. Susan Wright

'The Anthropology of International Institutions: Mechanisms of Global Governance'
June 10-12, 2010, Paris, France
Organizers: Birgit Muller (EHESS) and Susan Wright (University of Aarhus)

Sixteen anthropologists met at the workshop to clarify conceptual challenges and commonalities international institutions represent, where they explored such diverse topics as the Bangalore cityscape, the Cyprus peace process, and the World Heritage Convention to see how international institutions produce an understanding of the world. These institutions contribute to global knowledge/power regimes by linking up with a much larger and multiscalar
landscape of 'transnational policy networks.' While referring to 'universal values,' their practices of negotiation and pragmatic compromise constantly transform the norms and the institutional frames themselves. At the local and national level, institutions -- such as the FAO in Nicaragua and Ecuador, the World Bank in India and the UNHCR in Uganda --
involve and shape the collective and individual subjects with whom they interact. Powerful international institutions, such as the WTO and the World Bank, render political conflicts technical. International bureaucrats deploy expert knowledge in a low-key, almost invisible fashion in order to neutralize conflict. Participants analysed the resulting ambiguities and
contradictions in the interactions between civil society networks, state bureaucrats, and international institutions, as well as their impact on political agendas. The techniques of guidelines creation, audit and self-monitoring in the United Nations Environmental Program, the World Intellectual Property Organization, the UNHCR, and the UN Committee against Torture show how moral utopian goals and power dynamics are in constant tension with managerial techniques of governance and produce this particular field of interactions, ideas, and practices that fascinates anthropologists in international institutions.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,500

Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Scie

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Manchester, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 9, 2011
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Manchester, UK (through IUAES org. John Gledhill) - To aid travel to 17th Congress of IUAES: Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds, 2013, Manchester

'Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds: The 17th Congress of the International Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences'
August 5-10, 2013, Manchester University, Manchester, United Kingdom
Organizer: Dr. John Gledhill (Manchester U.)

This truly global congress brought together 1260 anthropologists from sixty-five countries to present 1283 papers in 211 parallel session panels, which successfully promoted dialogue between scholars from different countries and across sub-field boundaries. This networking will be consolidated in the future through the system of IUAES commissions that was reinvigorated at the event. The use of thematic tracks for the parallel sessions worked well in producing innovative and focused panels, the Museum Anthropology track involved international conversations that included countries such as China, and the Visual Anthropology program included several imaginative complements to the normal film-screenings and panel presentations. Wenner-Gren's central role in the promotion of world anthropology and the IUAES was entertainingly presented in Leslie Aiello's inaugural keynote address. Lourdes Arizpe and Howard Morphy gave additional keynotes sponsored by ASA and RAI respectively. Three plenaries consisted of debates between four key speakers, with additional audience participation, another well-received innovation that sharpened the presentation of issues and ensured global diversity amongst the plenary speakers. The final plenary was a panel discussion on World Anthropologies. This and two other panels were sponsored by WCAA. Edited videos of the plenary sessions are now available on YouTube, and various print publications are also in preparation.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$45,000

Chatty, Dawn

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 9, 2001
Project Title: 
Chatty, Dr. Dawn, Refugee Studies Center, Oxford, UK- To aid conference on mobile peoples and conservation: crossing the disciplinary divide, 2002, Oxford, in collaboration with Prof. Adrian Philips
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$5,000

Sussman, Robert Wald

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Sussman, Dr. Robert Wald, Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid workshop on 'Man The Hunted: The Evolution and Nature of Human Sociality, Cooperation, and Altruism,' 2009, Washington U., in collaboration with Dr. C. Robert Cloninger

'Man the Hunted: Sociality, Altruism, and Well-Being'
March 12-14, 2009, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
Organizers: Robert Sussman (Washington University) and C. Robert Cloninger (Washington University, School of Medicine)

All diurnal primates live in social groups. This is widely recognized as a predator protection mechanism. The more eyes and ears to detect predators and animals to mob them, the better the group is protected. Early humans traditionally have been thought of as hunters. However, because of their small size, dentition, lack of hunting tools, and a number of other
factors, it is more likely that the earliest humans, like most other primates, were prey species rather than predators. Social scientists, pyschologists, and biologists are learning that there is more to cooperation in group-living animals than an investment in one?s own nepotistic patch of DNA. Research in a diversity of scientific disciplines is revealing that there are many biological and behavioral mechanisms that humans and nonhuman primates use to reinforce pro-social or cooperative behavior. Sociality, cooperation, inter-individual dependency, and mutual protection are all part of the toolkit of social-living prey. In this symposium, participants explored this hypothesis and many of the mechanisms nonhuman primates and humans may have evolved as protection against predators, including cooperation, sociality, and altruism. Further, they explored how behavioral, hormonal, and neuro-psychiatric mechanisms related to our evolution as a prey species might be affecting modern human behavior.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$12,100

O'Neill, Colleen

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Utah State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2006
Project Title: 
O'Neill, Dr. Colleen M., Utah State U., Logan, UT - To aid conference on 'Indians, Labor, and Capitalist Culture: A colloquium of historians, ethnohistorians and anthropologists,' 2006, Newberry Library, in collaboration with Dr. Brian C. Hosmer

'Indians, Labor and Capitalist Culture: A Colloquium of Historians, Ethnohistorians and Anthropologists.' September 22-23, 2006, Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois. Organizers: Colleen O'Neill (Utah State University, Logan, Utah), Alexandra Harmon (University of Washington, Seattle, Washington), and Brian C. Hosmer (Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois). A body of scholarship has emerged during the last decade that significantly complicates and enhances our understanding of American Indians' history and its relation to economic development in the United States. The new scholarship features American Indians as workers, producers, entrepreneurs, and sophisticated economic analysts. They are historical actors whose stories challenge the intellectual paradigms that have segregated the study of Indians from the history of US economic culture. Such a complex portrait of American Indian history may also call into question some fundamental assumptions about the nature of 'modernity.' This two-day meeting at the Newberry Library was convened on September 22, 2006, to provide a more organized conversation of scholars engaged in this cutting-edge research. Anthropologists, American historians and Specialists in Native American Studies, gathered to discuss questions of mutual interest: how the incorporation of American Indian land and economies has impacted the development of the U.S. economy, what it has indicated about and meant for American economic culture, how Indians have engaged the market economy, how Indians have managed and understood their economic strategies since their subordination to US power, how Indians' strategies have affected their status and images in American society, and more. Such interdisciplinary dialogue provided important groundwork for further collaborative research.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$5,515

Koizumi, Junji

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2013
Project Title: 
Koizumi, Dr. Junji, Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology, Tokyo, Japan - To aid 'JASCA 50th Anniversary Conference + IUAES Inter-Congress,' 2014, Makuhari, Chiba, Japan, in collaboration with Ms. Eisei Kurimoto

Preliminary abstract: The Japanese Society of Cultural Anthropology, JASCA, will hold the 50th Anniversary Conference as the joint conference with the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, IUAES, Inter-Congress 2014 in Japan. The overall theme is 'The Future with/of Anthropologies.' This is the first international conference hosted by JASCA since the 8th Congress of the International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences held in Tokyo and Kyoto in 1968. With 2000 members JASCA is now the second largest national/regional association of anthropology in the world. Although its members' annual achievements are enormous both in quantity and quality, they are not very well known outside of Japan, and the Conference will provide a wonderful opportunity to expose anthropology in Japan, and to establish networks between anthropologists in Japan and abroad. The main topics of the Conference are the current status and future possibilities of anthropologies and their relevance to the future of human being.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Danda, Ajit Kumar

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Indian Anthropological Society
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 1, 2010
Project Title: 
Danda, Dr. Ajith, Indian Anthropological Society, Kolkata, India - To aid Golden Jubilee conference of IAS on 'Locating Alternative Voices of Anthropology,' 2011, Kolkata, in collaboration with Dr. Rajat Kanti Das

Preliminary abstract: The International Symposium proposed to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of the Indian Anthropological Society will have the following dual objectives :1) To eveluate the contributions of anthropologists : Euro-American, Afro-Asian, and Latin American in the light of dualism : Western vs. non-Western, that pervades the field of anthropology. 2) To evaluate the contributions of intellectuals, social thinkers, and literary figures toward anthropology in the Indian contexts. The Western view of anthropology, as a political and colonial discourse, has been countered by anthropologists from Asia, Africa, and Latin America in a way that may be understood as being based upon a rhetoric of equality reflected in the establishment of self-identity. It has discovered a voice to defend the rights of indigenes, tribes, and ethnic groups who were so long considered as products of a process of exclusion (Lindquist : 1966, Hulme : 1986,Todavor : 1987, Said : 1978, Mason : 1990, Thomas 1991, Danda : 1995, de-Certeau :1997). Though the American and European imagery of 'otherness' has been questened time and again, the Western discourses and practices are still regarded as guidelines for others to follow. Isn't it possible to look at anything but a product of the Western discourses and practices? This is the major issue to be debated in the proposed symposium.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Verkaaik, Oskar

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Amsterdam, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 18, 2008
Project Title: 
Verkaaik, Dr. Oskar, U. of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands - To aid workshop on 'Religion and Sexuality in Post-Colonial Europe: Between Categorization and Transcendence,' 2009, Amsterdam

'Religion and Sexuality in Post-Colonial Europe: Between Categorization and Transcendence'
January 29-30, 2009, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Organizer: Oskar Verkaaik (University of Amsterdam)

On the one hand, religion and sexuality are core markers in identity politics and the culturalization of citizenship, especially, but not only, in Europe today; on the other hand, religion and sexuality have the potential to transcend these very normative and cultural boundaries. This workshop explored this paradox in an ethnographic, sociological and historical way. Two main themes of the workshop were the construction of discourses on religion and sexuality in today?s new nationalisms, and the way groups of people appropriate and experience sexuality and religion against the background of the nationalist
projects. The discussions centered on how religion and sexuality are at the heart of postcolonial processes of 'othering' and sources of the authentic, subjective and sublime. The discussion focused partly on secularization and its religious -- more precisely, Christian -- genealogy. Participants explored the notion of a secular sexuality as public norm and as a
source of authenticity for both pious believers and secularists. These 'sexular' practices of self-understanding and authentification are experienced through the body. Therefore, the body became an important concept participants used to think with in their debates about the intersection of religion and sexuality.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$14,000
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