Paladi-Kovacs, Attila

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Institute of Ethnology
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 6, 2001
Project Title: 
Paladi-Kovacs, Dr. Attila, Institute of Ethnology, Budapest, Hungary - To aid conference on times, places, passages: ethnological approaches in the new millennium, 2001, Institute of Ethnology, in collaboration with Dr. Peter Neidermuller
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Lane, Paul

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Brisith Inst. in Eastern Africa
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 3, 2003
Project Title: 
Lane, Dr. Paul, British Institute in Eastern Africa, Nairobi, Kenya - To aid conference on heritage in southern and eastern Africa: imagining and marketing public culture and history, 2004, Livingstone Museum, in collaboration with Dr. Lyn Schumaker
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Erlmann, Veit F.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, Austin, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 30, 2002
Project Title: 
Erlmann, Dr. Veit, U. of Texas, Austin, TX - To aid conference on Hearing Culture: New Directions in the Anthropology of Sound, 2002, Oaxaca, Mexico
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Baehre, Erik

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Leiden U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 18, 2008
Project Title: 
Baehre, Dr. Erik, Leiden U., Leiden, The Netherlands - To aid workshop on 'Ethnografeast IV: Knowledges and Intimacies,' 2009, Amsterdam, in collaboration with Dr. Peter Pels

'Ethnografeast IV: Intimacies and Knowledges'
June 24-27, 2009, Leiden University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Organizers: Erik Baehre and Peter Pels, Leiden Univeristy

Ethnografeast IV brought together anthropologists and sociologists working on the nexus of intimacies, knowledges, and ethnography. Ethnographies of intimacies and knowledges were of particular interest in light of the frequently voiced concerns about individualization, diversity of religion and ethnicity, and the erosion of intimate communities. What are the
anthropological and sociological disputes that arise when the interdependencies of global or national transformations with the microsociological intimacy are examined? Which insights does ethnography generate on the relationship between intimacy and often abstract notions of the nation state, modernity, globalization, and neoliberalism? Herzfeld’s concept of cultural intimacy in particular opened up new avenues for exploring the construction of identity in the context of the nation state. How has the lexicon that Herzfeld developed -- particularly cultural intimacy, social poetics, and structural nostalgia -- inspired recent ethnographic research? The project of Ethnografeast IV stemmed from the discussions held in the previous meetings and aimed at promoting their further development by bringing together a new group of scholars and by centering them on the nexus of ethnography, intimacies, and knowledges. The organizing committee was particularly keen on stimulating an engaged and lively debate across the disciplines of anthropology and sociology, as well as across diverging (national) ethnographic traditions and epistemologies.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$14,000

Villeneuve, Suzanne Natascha

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Victoria, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 18, 2008
Project Title: 
Villeneuve, Suzanne N., U. of Victoria, BC, Canada - To aid workshop on 'Archaeological and Anthropological Perspectives on Ritual Spaces and Sacred Places,' 2012, Simon Fraser U., Burnaby, BC, in collaboration with Dr. Brian D. Hayden

Preliminary Abstract: The research encompassed by this workshop is fundamental to understanding the role of ritual activities in the emergence of socioeconomic inequalities and political complexity in village-level (transegalitarian) ethnographic and prehistoric societies. This workshop will first document the range of ethnographic village-level ritual activities and then develop models to understand the role of ritual in community dynamics. Although ritual activity in transegalitarian societies has been implicated in the creation of socioeconomic inequalities and political power, theoretical models of the kinds of rituals, the motivations for creating them, and the means by which they promote inequalities are poorly developed for transegalitarian societies (with a few notable exceptions such as ancestor worship). There is no general synthesis of ritual activity at this level of organization. Moreover, for archaeologists, there is as yet little ethnographic or archaeological information on how such activities can be identified at transegalitarian levels. Thus, in this workshop, we will focus on what purposes rituals serve in relation to social, political, and economic dynamics of transegalitarian communities, and how these aspects can be identified archaeologically.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$14,628

Prinz, Armin

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Vienna, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 20, 2003
Project Title: 
Prinz, Dr. Armin, U. of Vienna, Vienna, Austria - To aid conference on hunting food, drinking wine, 2003, Poysdorf, Austria

Publication Credit:

Prinz, Armin (ed.) 2006. Hunting Food and Drinking Wine. Proceedings of the Conference in Poysdorf, Austria 2003. Proceedings of the XIX Congress of the International Commission for the Anthropology of Food (ICAF), International Union of Ethnological and Anthropological Sciences (IUAES). Lit Verlag: Berlin.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$5,000

Little, Peter Deal

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Emory U.
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
August 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Little, Dr. Peter Deal, Emory U., Atlanta, GA - To aid workshop on 'Tax Matters: Anthropological Theory and Ethnographic Methods to the Service of a New Fiscal Sociology,' 2013, Emory U., in collaboration with Dr. Jose Maria Munoz and Dr. Thomas Cantens

Preliminary abstract: Taxes are one of the long-established, generalized, and persistent means through which individuals and groups experience relationships with their government, the legal system, and the broader society of which they are members. 'New fiscal sociology' has been recently proposed as the name for an emerging field of scholarly inquiry that places the relations of taxation at the center of historical and comparative accounts of social change. This and other recent academic ventures have attracted contributions from economics, sociology, political science, history, geography, law, and accounting. Anthropologists have been conspicuously absent in this new wave of scholarship.
Through the critical examination of tax policy, law, and administration in a series of diverse settings, we will take important steps in fulfilling the promise of anthropology for the study these critical issues. Three premises guide our efforts: our readiness to rise to the challenges of interdisciplinary research, our determination to take the technical aspects of taxation seriously, and our emphasis on rigorous ethnographic engagement. Confronted with the wide open frontiers of anthropological research on taxation, the workshop chooses to focus on three sets of questions: fiscal payments and the social contract; taxation and bureaucratic knowledge practices; and global fiscal governance. We intend to contribute thus to major theoretical debates in political, economic, and legal anthropology.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,400

Gallagher, Andrew

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Witwatersrand, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 1, 2005
Project Title: 
Gallagher, Dr. Andrew, U. of Witwatersrand Medical School, Johannesburg, South Africa - To aid conference on 'African Genesis': A celebration of Taung hominid and the career of Phillip Tobias, 2006, Johannesburg, in collaboration with Dr. Colin Menter

The African Genesis Symposium convened in Johannesburg, South Africa, January 8-14, 2006, and focussed on critical issues relating to the origins, divergence and radiation of early and later hominids in the African Continent. More than 70 International Delegates (invited participants, scholars, and students) attended the Symposium as did South African scholars, students, interested amateurs, and members of the public. The opening cocktail party coincided with the opening of a temporary gallery of original fossil hominids and casts of recent discoveries in Africa and West Asia. The scientific programme and subsequent discussion sessions were both stimulating and profitable. The first colloquium included presentations by Professor Michel Brunet, Professor Martin Pickford and Professor Brigitte Senut on the spectacular new discoveries of early hominids from Chad and Kenya. Presentations by Professor Bill Jungers and Professor Dean Falk considered aspects of the functional morphology and palaeobiology of Homo floresiensis and its bearing on earlier hominids. Professor David Lordkipanidze and Professor Philip Rightmire detailed the morphological and evolutionary significance of the earliest hominids from Dmanisi, Georgia. Professor Fred Spoor presented evidence of new discoveries of Australopithecus and Homo from the Pliocene and Pleistocene of the Lake Turkana basin.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Bentley, Gillian R.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
College London, U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 5, 2003
Project Title: 
Bentley, Dr. Gillian R., U. College London, London, United Kingdom - To aid conference on alloparenting in human societies, 2004, in collaboration with Dr. Ruth H. Mace

'Alloparenting in Human Societies,' May 7-8, 2004, University College London, London, England -- Organizers: Gillian Bentley and Ruth Mace (University College London). This conference, the annual symposium of the Biosocial Society (UK), brought together scholars from a variety of disciplines to address the issue of alloparenting-the provision of care to dependent children by persons other than the biological parents. It has been argued that children are among the most understudied 'societies' in anthropology. The conference was designed to fill this gap by holistically examining an area of immense theoretical and practical concern in which the discipline might make an enormous contribution. Sixteen scholars from around the world participated, covering themes such as 'Why Humans Allocare,' 'Childcare Practice,' 'Alternative Families,' and 'Cross-Cultural Examples of Alloparenting.' The results were to be compiled in an edited volume for submission to Cambridge University Press.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$13,000

Rolandi, Diana Susana

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Inst. Nacional de Anthropologia y Pensamient LatinoAmericano
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 7, 2007
Project Title: 
Rolandi, Dr. Diana Susana, Instituto Nacional de Antropologia, Buenos Aires, Argentina - To aid ISFNR interim conference on Folk Narrative Studies, 2007, Santa Rosa, Argentina, in collaboration with Ana Maria Dupey

'Folk Narrative and Society'
September 20-22, 2007, Santa Rosa la Pampa, Argentina
Organizers: Diana Rolandi and Ana María Dupey (Instituto Nacional de Antrhopología, Buenos Aires) and María Inés Poduje (Departamento Investigaciones Culturales, La Pampa)

This meeting was an interim conference of the International Society of Folk Narrative Research (ISFNR). More than 120 folklorists and anthropologists from 24 countries attended the proceedings, presenting over 90 papers in five major sessions. Among the main them