Kirtsoglou, Elisabeth

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Durham, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
March 5, 2015
Project Title: 
Kirtsoglou, Dr. Elisabeth, U. of Durham, Durham, UK - To aid ASA conference on 'Footprints And Futures: The Time of Anthropology,' 2016, Durham, in collaboration with Dr. Robert Simpson

Preliminary abstract: The 2016 ASA conference will focus on contemporary knowledge making in anthropology with one eye on the footprints that we have left [narratives, traditions, scholarship, disciplinary identities, methodologies and the nature of evidence], and the other on the futures glimpsed in the richness and diversity of our anthropological practice. The conference is seeking to provide a lens for the re-examination of the conditions under which anthropological knowledge is shaping and is shaped by critical times. Crucially, the purpose of Footprints and Futures is not inward facing reflection. In the societies in which we live and work as anthropologists there are profound concerns about sustainability, security of livelidhood, diversity, equality and access to hope for the future. The questions posed about the ways in which we produce anthropological knowledge are being brought into sharp focus at a time when inequality, conflict and the mal-distribution of resources leave a deepening footprint on large swathes of humanity. The aim of the conference is to bring together an international and interdisciplinary community of scholars from all stages of the researcher life-cycle who will debate the discipline's critical relevance and a reflect upon the different temporalities within which our knowledge making unfolds.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Dilley, Roy Martin

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
St. Andrews, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 9, 2008
Project Title: 
Dilley, Dr. Roy, U. of St. Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom - To aid 'Visual Representations of Iran: Conference, Film Season, Photographic Exhibition,' 2008, U. of St. Andrews, in collaboration with Dr. Pedram Khosronejad

'Visual Representations of Iran: Conference, Film Season, and Photographic Exhibition'
13-16 June 2008, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Scotland
Organizers: Dr. Roy Dilley and Dr. Pedram Khosronejad (University of St. Andrews)

The aim of this meeting (including a conference, a film season, and a photographic exhibition) was to interpret and theorize visual representations of Iran in ethnographic and documentary films, as well as other visual art forms. Incorporating both Iranian and non-Iranian visualizations, the goal of this conference was to explore anthropologically the wide range of filmic representations of Iran, including the particular genre of ethnographic documentary as an object of analysis within a wider understanding of Visual Anthropology. The conference gathered together anthropologists, ethnographers, film-makers, photographers and artists from Iran and elsewhere who were interested in the visual representation of Iran, with the aim of bringing them into an international dialogue and debate about key academic, aesthetic, moral, and political issues in the area. This conference inaugurated a series of new intellectual developments at the University of St. Andrews, including the recent establishment of a new post in the Anthropology of Iran (the only one in the UK) in the Department of Social Anthropology, of a new Department of Film Studies, and of an Institute for Iranian Studies. This conference was a means of celebrating these various initiatives and of bringing together local staff and international scholars who have interests in the visual representation of Iran.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$14,500

Andersson Strand, Eva

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Copenhagen, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2013
Project Title: 
Andersson Strand, Dr. Eva, U. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark - To aid workshop on 'Traditional Textile Craft: An Intangible Cultural Heritage?,' 2014, Jordan Museum, Amman, Jordan, in collaboration with Dr. Jihad Kafaki

'Traditional Textile Craft: An Intangible Cultural Heritage?'
March 24-31, 2014, The Jordan Museum, Amman, Jordan
Organizers: Eva Anderson Strand (U. Copenhagen) and Dr. Jihad Kafaki (Jordan Museum)

This workshop's aim was to create an interactive, international, and interdisciplinary network and platform for knowledge exchange that would allow wide-ranging and innovative approaches in this area and to make the importance of textile crafts and textile histories more visible, with a clear recognition of the inter-relationships between textiles, textile crafts, people and cultural heritage. Sixty particpants from around the world were convened, representing textile craft organizations, modern textile designers, textile craft technicians, and UNESCO, as well as the academic disciplines of archaeology, anthroplogy, history, and philology. The workshop addressed four themes: 1) definitions of traditional craft-practice and use of terminology; 2) the relationship of traditional textile craft to modern fashion studies; 3) the use of traditional textile craft and craftsmanship in the interpretation of ancient societies; and 4) preserving traditional textile heritage and making it visible. Workshop lectures and discussions clearly demonstrated not only the need for collaborative events but also the importance of interdisciplinary approaches and collaborations, and resulted several developments that that can be followed on the conference's website (http://conferences.saxo.ku.dk/traditionaltextilecraft/) and blog (http://www.traditionaltextilecraft.dk/) .

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Spiegel, Andrew D.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cape Town, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2006
Project Title: 
Spiegel, Dr. Andrew, U. Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa - To aid joint IUAES intercongress and PAAA/ASnA conference on 'Transcending Postcolonial Conditions: Towards alternative modernities,' 2007, U. Cape Town, in collaboration with Dr. Fiona Ross

'Transcending Postcolonial Conditions: Towards Alternative Modernities'
December 3-7, 2007, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
Organizers: Andrew Spiegel and Fiona Ross (University of Cape Town)

An intercongress of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES) joined together with the Pan African Association of Anthropologists (PAAA) and Anthropology Southern Africa (ASnA) for a conference on 'Transcending Postcolonial Conditions: Towards Alternative Modernities,' held in Cape Town. The goal of the joint meeting was for internationally based anthropologists to engage in ethnographically based discussion of the predicament of contemporarily marginalized people -- whether in formally postcolonial areas or in pockets of metropolitan countries -- and to consider alternative modernist structures that arise under those circumstances. It also hosted the first ever meeting of the IUAES executives and leaders of the World Congress of Anthropological Associations (WCAA).Two hundred twenty-two papers (including two keynotes) were accepted. Presented in 70 parallel sessions (plus three plenaries), they involved over 250 scholars from 49 countries in all five major continents. The conference was probably the largest and most diverse ever of social and cultural anthropologists held at an African continental venue. Particularly interesting was the final synthetic plenary. Presented by southern African graduate students, it revealed a sharp critique of various aspects of the discussions and also an intensity and lively interest among local younger anthropologists, and it offered reassurance of our discipline’s capacity to retain its critical edge. Similar reassurances emanated from a roundtable discussion on perspectives on doing anthropology in a contemporary context, with students and colleagues from peripheral areas whose attendance was made possible by support from Wenner-Gren.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$20,000

O'Connell, Tamsin C

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cambridge, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 19, 2010
Project Title: 
O'Connell, Dr. Tamsin Christina, U. of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK - To aid '7th Advanced Seminar on Palaeodiet,' 2010, McDonald Institute, Cambridge, in collaboration with Dr. Julia Anne Lee-Thorp

'7th Advanced Seminar On Palaeodiet'
June 21-26, 2010, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Organizers: Tamsin O'Connell (University of Cambridge) and Julia Lee-Thorp (University of Oxford)

Diet is a key question in archaeology because it impacts on so many human conditions, such as economy, health, status, life history, environment, and residence. Chemical analyses of human and animal remains are now routinely used to elucidate palaeodietary patterns, proving informative at many stages of the past, from diets of extinct hominids to transitions
to agriculture and urban societies. The chemical markers analyzed (mostly stable isotopes) reflect chemical compositional differences between food types, transferred to consumers’ body tissues during the incorporation of dietary intake. The field has expanded rapidly in breadth and in technological advances that allow finer-scale sampling. These advances offer
opportunities to address more subtle archaeological questions, but they have also made it obvious that we face considerable challenges relating to more nuanced interpretations of the data. In the tradition of previous Seminars on Palaeodiet, this meeting brought together experts from archaeology, ecology, and physiology, to address current questions and challenges in an intensive workshop format.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$13,190

Laugrand, Frederic Benjamin

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Laval, Quebec, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 3, 2003
Project Title: 
Laugrand, Dr. Frederic, U. Laval, Sainte-Foy, Canada - To aid conference on 'The nature of spirits': human and non-human beings in Amerindian cosmologies, 2004, Quebec City, in collaboration with Dr. Jarich Oosten

'The Nature of Spirits: Human and Nonhuman Beings in Aboriginal Cosmologies,' April 29-May 1, 2004, Quebec City, Canada -- Organizers: Frederic Laugrand (University of Laval) and Jarich Oosten (University of Leiden). Participants in this conference discussed how Amerindian peoples from North and South America (and other societies in contrast) conceive of their relationships to the various spiritual and physical entities that belong to 'nature' and 'supernature,' if these terms are appropriate. Many topics were explored from a comparative perspective. The first day, discussions focused on notions and categories such as those of human and nonhuman figures, ontology, culture, nature, supernature, perspectivism, morality, commensality, cannibalism, and predation. On the following days, two main issues were tackled through local ethnographies. First, participants discussed humanity and animality relationships, with an emphasis on the mediating position of dogs in North America. Then, introducing a diachronic perspective, they discussed ways in which nonhuman entities and shamanic spirits can be transformed, rejected, appropriated, transmitted, or incorporated-in sum, how spirits are visible or invisible and how they can always adapt and circulate.

Publication Credit:

Laugrand, Frederic B., Jarich G. Oosten (eds.) 2005 Nature of Spirits in Aboriginal Cosmologies. Les Presses de L’Université Laval: Quebec, Canada.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Fernald, Theodore B.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Swarthmore College
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 9, 2006
Project Title: 
Fernald, Dr. Theodore Barker, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA - To aid conference on 'Athabaskan Languages,' 2007, Window Rock, AZ

'Athabaskan Languages Conference'
June 21-24, 2007, Diné College, Tsaile, Arizona
Organizer: Dr. Theodore Barker Fernald (Swarthmore College)

The Athabaskan Languages Conference meets annually and is the primary forum for anthropologists, educators, and linguists engaged in research on Athabaskan -- a family of languages that is spread over a large area of North America, with concentrations in Western Canada (Slave, Dëne Suliné, Sarsi), Alaska (Koyukon, Ahtna, Gwich'in), the west coast of the United States (Hupa), and the US Southwest (Navajo, Apache). This year, 23 papers were presented on topics ranging from language revitalization efforts in the Northwest Territories, to the development of online dictionaries, to the syntactic and semantic analysis of negation. Interpreters provided real-time translation services between Navajo and English. The conference opened with a presentation explaining what linguistics is in Navajo for the benefit of community members who attended the conference.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Barrantes, Ramiro

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Costa Rica, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
Barrantes, Dr. Ramiro, U. de Costa Rica, San Jose, Costa Rica - To aid 'XII Meeting of the Latin American Association of Biological Anthropology (ALAB),' 2012, San Jose, in collaboration with Dr. Silvia Salgado Gonzalez

'XII Congreso de la Associación Latinoamericana de Antropología Biológica (ALAB)'
November 13-16, 2012. San Jose, Costa Rica
Organizers: Ramiro Barrantes and Silvia Salgado González (U. of Costa Rica)

This twelfth meeting of the Latin American Association of Biological Anthropology (ALAB) was held was organized in collaboration with the Departments of Anthropology and Biology at the University of Costa Rica. Financial support was provided by the University of Costa Rica, the Costa Rican Ministry of Science and Technology, and the Wenner-Gren Foundation. Eight symposia, forty free presentations, and thirty-nine posters were presented and one hundred forty researchers and students attended the meeting. Participants discussed such topics as the evolution of human health, anthropological and forensic genetics, biological and cultural co-evolution, and ethics and humans rights. Detailed information about the congress, schedule and results of the activity can be found on the website http://xii-congreso-alab-2012.org/

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Toren, Christina

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Brunel U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 21, 2001
Project Title: 
Toren, Dr. Christina, Brunel U., Uxbridge, UK - To aid conference on children in their places, 2001, Brunel U., in collaboration with Ian Robinson
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$11,700

Pocs, Eva

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pecs, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
Pocs, Dr. Eva, U. of Pecs, Pecs, Hungary - To aid workshop on 'Spirit Possession. European Contributions to Comparative Studies,' 2012, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pecs, in collaboration with Dr.Andras Zempleni

Preliminary abstract: European conceptions and rituals of spirit possession described by historians and ethnographers of Western and Eastern Europe have never been compared systematically with those observed by anthropologists elsewhere in the world. This workshop intends to trigger an exchange of ideas between qualified representatives of these oddly separated research communities in order to reformulate some basic questions recently raised in comparative anthropology of possession. Anthropological studies are still rooted in European notions of body-soul dualism, concepts of self and personhood, and they convey a whole set of presuppositions inherited from Christian models of „good' and „bad' possession. This legacy and these lasting presuppositions will be reviewed in a debate with historians of Europe going back to their origins. We expect a significant contribution of the workshop to ongoing anthropological attempts to redefine the very notion of possession to be freed from the western notion of the self and more clearly delineated from related idioms such as witchcraft, devotion, mysticism etc. European studies which have long been faced at a diachronic level with the thorny issue of delineation may both contribute to and benefit from ongoing anthropological studies focused on interactive transformations of official and popular concepts of possession competing in the contemporary transnationalized religious spaces of the Americas. New field data to be presented on the contents of messages issued by North-Indian and Malagasy mediums in a state of trance may incite both camps to revise former ideas on the nature of 'communication' triggered by trance. A pioneering anthropological approach, experimentally extended to European models, will address African possession rites as a form of indigenous historiography. This perspective promises to become another meaningful meeting point between Europeanists, Africanists, Americanists and Indianists.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$19,500
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