Long, Nicholas James

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cambridge, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 19, 2010
Project Title: 
Long, Dr. Nicholas J., U. of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK - To aid workshop on 'The Social Life of Achievement,' 2010, U. of Cambridge, in collaboration with Dr. Henrietta Louise Moore

'The Social Life of Achievement'
September 29 - October 2, 2010, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Organizers: Nicholas J. Long and Henrietta Louise Moore (University of Cambridge)

Concepts of achievement and motivation enjoy widespread circulation in today’s world. They are taken up and vernacularized in distinctive ways by both individuals and policy makers, and are implicit in many anthropological notions of agency and efficacy. Achievement is widely seen as a pathway to fulfillment and prosperity. Yet increasing
bodies of research in both anthropology and developmental psychology has suggested that matters may not be so simple. While achievement can empower people, it can also leave them unhappy, unconfident, and risk avoidant. This workshop brought together specialists from anthropology, psychology, and related disciplines to develop a comparative approach to the multiple trajectories that achievement has in the social world -- the 'social life of achievement.' Papers traced the genealogy of 'achievement' in different settings as well as the significant political, material, and social circumstances in which achievement occurred, the way that experiences and explanations of achievement articulated with local understandings of the self, and achievement’s capacity to be narrated -- or go unrecognized -- within specific genres. In every case, these dynamics could be strategically manipulated so as to empower or oppress. Participants also discussed the methodology and ethics of writing anthropologically about ‘achievement’, and the potential contribution that anthropological interventions could make to policy.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$13,207

Gilbert, Andrew

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
McMaster U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 1, 2013
Project Title: 
Gilbert, Dr. Andrew, McMaster U., Hamilton, Ontario, Canada - To aid workshop on 'Towards an Anthropology of International Intervention,' 2013, McMaster U.

Preliminary abstract: This workshop proposes to chart new theoretical territory and set a new agenda for an ethnographically-grounded, historically-sensitive anthropology of international intervention in the 21st century. The world has recently witnessed the proliferation of new and ambitious forms of foreign intervention by powerful Western states, guided by rationales and aims that were only nascent during the Cold War. Initiated at moments of political and humanitarian crisis, such interventions seek not only to bring care to the suffering or an end to conflict, but also use such occasions to transform the conditions which lie at the root of conflict and suffering. To this end, and often under conditions of military occupation or foreign supervision, such interventions sought to transform the very nature of the social. Anthropology has played a modest role in the critical scholarship that has responded to this proliferation of foreign interventions. Drawing on a range of theory, anthropologists have offered important critiques designed to show that the modes of power exercised in the name of care or democracy are anything but benign. With a few exceptions, however, anthropological scholarship has focused largely on the interveners and their ambitions, thus excluding attention to those intervened upon, as well as the complex relations between the two that arise out of the intervention encounter. Much of this work is also ethnographically or historically thin when it comes to discussing the effects of such interventions on the people and places that are the objects of intervention. This workshop will put current anthropological accounts and their theoretical underpinnings into conversation with the research of a new generation of younger scholars with extensive ethnographic experience working across diverse sites of intervention. By situating international intervention projects within the wider social and cultural fields in which they take place, this workshop seeks to build upon this important work and act as a corrective to some of its gaps.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$9,500

Bogopa, David Legodi

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Port Elizabeth, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 6, 2003
Project Title: 
Bogopa, David, U. of Port Elizabeth, Port Elizabeth, South Africa - To aid conference of Pan African Anthropology Association on anthropology and contemporary global trends, 2003, U. of Port Elizabeth, in collaboration with Welile Khuzwayo
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Rudan, Pavao

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Inst. for Anthropological Research
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 17, 2002
Project Title: 
Rudan, Dr. Pavao, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia - To aid 13th congress of the European Anthropological Association (EAA): a quarter century of EA A - Reflections and Perspectives, 2002, Zagreb

'13th Congress of the European Anthropological Association (EAA): 'A Quarter Century of the European Anthropological Association - Reflections and Perspectives',' August 30-September 3, 2002, Zagreb, Croatia -- Organizers Dr. Pavao Rudan, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia. It was organized by Croatian Anthropological Society and Institute for Anthropological Research. Funding from Wenner-Gren Foundation made it possible for 48 students to attend the 13th EAA Congress, which consisted of six plenary sessions (30 lectures), thirteen symposia (172 presentations) and a poster session (234 posters) comprising a wide range of anthropological topics. Altogether 419 scientists from 36 European and overseas countries, including many students and young researchers, gathered to re-evaluate EAA past achievements and, more importantly, to specify its future goals. The emphasis was laid on the need to strengthen cooperation and to broaden the range of educational possibilities in anthropology in Europe.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$10,200

Matthews, Christopher Nelson

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Hofstra U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2009
Project Title: 
Matthews, Dr. Christopher, Hofstra U., Hempstead, NY - To aid workshop on 'Dynamics of Inclusion in Public Archaeology,' 2010, African Burial Ground National Park, New York, NY, in collaboration with Dr. Carol McDavid

'Dynamics of Inclusion in Public Archaeology'
September 17-18, 2010, African Burial Ground National Monument, New York, New York
Organizers: Christopher N. Mathews (Hofstra University), Carol McDavid (Community Archaeology Research Institute), and Patrice L. Jeppson (West Chester Univeristy)

The workshop consisted of one day devoted to the presentation and discussion of original papers, and a second day including a public lecture program on 'Archaeology and the Public New York.' The workshop brought together a diverse set of public archaeologists representing varied areas of scholarly interest, global locations, and professional positions to explore questions about the actual participation of the public in public archaeology projects. Scholars from both academic and non-academic professional positions contributed original papers discussing their recent experience and research in public archaeology. Papers considered research in Brazil, South Africa, England, Israel, Jordan, and the United States.
Questions about the definition of communities, archaeological advocacy and activism, heritage law, public and youth education, the antiquities trade, and conflicts between archaeologists and community interests were considered. Discussion of the papers was very animated and productive, and all participants were thoroughly engaged. The public event --
dealing with controversial community history concerns -- had an overwhelming response, with members of the public needing to be turned away. Several audience members and presenters noted in discussion that the event was 'healing.'

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Harney, Nicholas DeMaria

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Western Australia, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 17, 2011
Project Title: 
Harney, Dr. Nicholas D., U. of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia - To aid IUAES, AAS, ASAANZ conf. on 'Knowledge & Value in Globalizing World: Disentangling Dichotomies, Querying Unities,' 2011, Perth, in collaboration with Dr. Gregory Acciaioli

Preliminary abstract: This Conference is the first joint gathering of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES), the Australian Anthropological Society (AAS) and the Association of Social Anthropologists of Aotearoa/New Zealand (ASAANZ). It is a unique collaborative effort to facilitate an international debate about the epistemology of anthropology -- a critical re-evaluation and examination about our basic categories of understanding - as they have shaped recent developments within the discipline, and as they have informed popular discourse about the globalizing world. This will include a discussion about the ethical dimensions of the popularization of anthropology and the problematic use of our signature concepts by other disciplines. The aim of the Conference is create a dialogue that is as inclusive and as interdisciplinary as possible among scholars from the Global North and South. The Conference will also create a larger stage for antipodean anthropology which has had a significant historical role in shaping the history of the discipline; it will facilitate networks for early career researchers; and it will showcase the work of international and national postgraduate students. By bringing together local and global societies, we will provide an opportunity to attract attention to, and disseminate knowledge about, anthropological thought and practice.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$14,799

Callan, Hilary Margaret West

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Royal Anthropological Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 7, 2007
Project Title: 
Callan, Dr. Hilary, Royal Anthropological Institute, London, United Kingdom - To aid 'Combined Conference and RAI International Festival of Ethnographic Film,' 2007, Manchester, United Kingdom, in collaboration with Dr. Paul S. Henley
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$7,256

Shankland, David Peter

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Bristol, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 18, 2008
Project Title: 
Shankland, Dr. David P., U. of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom - To aid conference of Association of Social Anthropologists (ASA) on 'Anthropological and Archaeological Imaginations: Past, Present, and Future,' 2009, U. of Bristol

'ASA09: Anthropological and Archaeological Imaginations: Past, Present and Future'
April 6-9, 2009, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
Organizer: David Shankland, University of Bristol

The aim of the 2009 conference of the Association of Social Anthropologists was to bring together anthropologists and archaeologists to create a sustained dialogue between the two disciplines. In particular, conference participants were asked to note that though archaeologists have long taken notice of social anthropologists and the work that they have done, anthropologists have been much less ready to repay the complement. The call for papers yielded a substantial response. Ultimately there were some 400 delegates, most of whom also offered papers. An opening address by Professor Herzfeld (Harvard) was followed by three plenary sessions. These plenary sessions, with some supplementary chapters, will be published by Berg as part of the ASA monograph series, while individual presenters have been invited to publish their articles electronically on the ASA site. The theme of the conference clearly attracted considerable interest, which participants hope to build upon with continuing efforts to foster links between the two disciplines.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Moore, Jerry D.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California State U., Dominguez Hills
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2009
Project Title: 
Moore, Dr. Jerry D., California State U. Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA - To aid workshop on 'Divergent Trajectories to Prehistoric Social Complexity in the Equatorial Andes: Un Taller Móvil,' 2010, Quito, Ecuador, in collaboration with Dr. Francisco Valdez

'Divergent Trajectories towards Social Complexity: Formative Transformations in the Equatorial Andes'
July 1-17, 2010, Ecuador and Peru (multiple locations)
Organizers: Jerry D. Moore (California State U. Dominguez Hills) and Francisco Valdez (Institute de Recherche pour la Développement)

This workshop brought together Peruvian and Ecuadorian archaeologists investigating the prehistoric origins of social complexity and settled village life in the equatorial Andes of southern Ecuador and northern Peru. These Formative societies apparently were broadly contemporary (circa 3000 - 1000 BCE), independent, but interacting-resulting in a complex mosaic of archaeological patterns on both sides of the international border between Peru and Ecuador. Rather than a conventional conference, this seminar occurred at multi-sited venues over 2500 km-archaeological sites, museums, research labs and field stations-where archaeologists could examine and discuss artifactual materials and sites first-hand. In addition, a series of events were held in La Libertad and Cuenca, Ecuador, and in Tumbes and Piura, Peru; these four seminars were open to the public, and were attended by more than 300 people. The workshop also established the ground-work for future, binational collaborative archaeological research and heritage management programs such as field investigations, publications, and the establishment of a moderated Web page to support the continued exchange of scientific information between Peruvian and Ecuadorian archaeologists.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,290