Hildebrand, Elisabeth A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Stony Brook, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 9, 2008
Project Title: 
Hildebrand, Dr. Elisabeth, Stony Brook U., NY - To aid workshop on 'From Fishers to Herders: Holocene Subsistence Intensification in the Turkana Basin,' 2008, East Hampton, NY, in collaboration with Dr. Richard Leakey

'From Fishers to Herders: Holocene Subsistence Intensification in the Turkana Basin'
October 13-18, 2009, East Hampton, New York
Organizers: Elisabeth Hildebrand and Richard Leakey (Stony Brook University)

The sixth in a series of Human Evolution Workshops organized by the Turkana Basin Institute and Stony Brook University, this meeting brought together 20 scholars (including graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and senior scholars) from Kenya, Ethiopia, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Core themes for discussion included contemporary diversity among early Holocene hunter-gatherers around Lake Turkana, the beginnings of herding in northwest Kenya, and the development of social complexity among local herders. Participants evaluated current paleoenvironmental records for the basin, critiqued existing chronological sequences, and suggested ways to improve both. Several archaeologists compared trajectories of social change in Holocene Turkana with those in other parts of Africa (central and western Kenya, the Sahara, Ethiopia, and coastal Eritrea), encouraging all participants to consider Turkana research in a broader geographical and anthropological framework. Senior and junior scholars together devised strategies to refine research efforts around the lake, push new investigations into surrounding areas, and ensure future collaboration between research teams.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Smith, John Charles

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 3, 2005
Project Title: 
Smith, John Charles, St. Catherine's College, Oxford, United Kingdom - To aid Third Oxford-Kobe Linguistics Seminar: 'The Linguistics of Endangered Languages,' 2006, St. Catherine's College, in collaboration with Dr. Peter K. Austin

'The Linguistics of Endangered Languages'
April 2-6, 2006, Kobe Institute, Kobe, Japan
Organizers: Dr. John Charles Smith and Dr. Masayoshi Shibatani (Kobe Institute), and Dr. Peter K. Austin (St. Catherine's College - Oxford)

The Third Oxford-Kobe Linguistics Seminar brought together distinguished scholars from inside and outside Japan to present their research in the dedicated academic environment and so define the 'state of the art' in their discipline. The two previous Linguistics Seminars dealt with 'Language Change and Historical Linguistics' (2002) and 'The History and Structure of Japanese' (2004). The topic of 'The Linguistics of Endangered Languages' was chosen as the focus of the seminar because to elaborate on the point (often made, but less frequently demonstrated) that the loss of endangered languages means the loss of unique and unusual linguistic features that we would otherwise have no knowledge of, and that the extinction of languages inevitably results in a poorer linguistics and a poorer language and cultural heritage for the world as a whole. In addition to invited papers, a poster session was convened to highlight the work of junior scholars and graduate students in the field.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$9,000

Cameron, Noel

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Loughborough U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
Cameron, Dr. Noel, Loughborough U., Leicestershire, UK - To aid workshop on 'The Anthropology of Transition and Tradition,' 2012, Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with Dr. Sasa Missoni

'Anthropology of Transition and Tradition'
September 12-15, 2012, Hvar, Croatia
Organizers: Noel Cameron (Loughborough U.) and Dr. Sasa Missoni (Inst. for Anthropological Research, Zagreb)

While it is widely accepted that the process of national transition from a 'developing' to a 'developed' status is assessed against economic indicators, it is also recognized that the process of transition is driven by a variety of demographic, social, political, cultural, and biological changes that both lead to and follow from economic transition. Anthropologists have traditionally sought to understand transition through examining cultural, social, or biological changes in, for example, the organization of society or in changes in human morphological variation. This meeting explored transition in the light of empirical evidence from transitional societies that provided new insights into traditional anthropological theory regarding social, biological, and behavioral outcomes that result from 'development.' The relationship between economic and demographic indicators of the level of transition and anthropological outcomes that reflect associated changes in social organization, behavior and morphology was explored. The workshop was broad in scope and included representatives with research in transitional economies in addition to representatives from post-transitional nations who study transition from the perspective of industrialized societies.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$19,870

Mussi, Margherita

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Rome, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 1, 2013
Project Title: 
Mussi, Dr. Margherita, U. of Rome, Rome, Italy - To aid workshop on 'The Emergence of the Acheulean in East Africa,' 2013, U. of Rome, in collaboration with Dr. Rosalia Gallotti

Preliminary abstract: The end of the Oldowan, and the origin of the Acheulean, are widely debated in Early Stone Age studies. In East Africa, there is now solid geochronological evidence pointing to the emergence of the Acheulean between 1.76 and 1.4 Ma. New approaches to lithic collections, including analysis of lithic technology, also put into question previous techno-typological definitions. Doubts have aroused on the hypothesis of a coexistence of Developed Oldowan and Early Acheulean.Despite ongoing discussions, however, the tempo and mode of technological changes leading to the emergence of the Acheulean are still poorly understood. This has wide implications outside Africa, as the Acheulean is also found in Europe and Asia The aim of the proposed workshop is to bring together for the first time researchers currently working in this field in East Africa, in order to define: 1) the characteristics of the Early Acheulean; 2) the evolution of the Early Acheulean.The role of the Early Acheulean in the emergence of the Acheulean outside Africa will not be dealt into any detail. However, the outcome of the workshop will also pave the way to better understanding dispersals into other continents, and/or typo-technological convergences.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$14,200

Jessee, Erin

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
British Columbia, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2013
Project Title: 
Jessee, Dr. Erin, U. of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada - To aid workshop on 'Approaching Perpetrators: Ethnographic Insights on Ethics, Methodology, and Theory,' 2014, U. of British Columbia

Preliminary abstract: 'Approaching Perpetrators: Ethnographic Insights on Ethics, Methodology and Theory' takes a nuanced approach to the personal, social, cultural, economic, political, and historical contexts through which people become perpetrators of violence, from everyday violence to mass atrocities, and the politics of memory and history that influence transitioning and post-conflict communities' responses to their actions. The following research questions will be addressed: What might ethnographic fieldwork among perpetrators look like in different settings? What are some of the particular ethical and methodological challenges of conducting fieldwork among perpetrators? And of greatest importance, how can engaging with perpetrators enhance existing anthropological theories regarding everyday violence and mass atrocities? This workshop will accomplish two primary objectives, including: (1) establishing an international network of anthropologists and related practitioners who use ethnographic methods to engage with perpetrators; and (2) generating new insights regarding how perpetrators' perspectives and lived experiences can facilitate a more nuanced understanding of the forces that drive violence. In addition, the resulting papers will be published in an edited volume or special issue of a journal that is of specific relevance to ethnographers who work with perpetrators in a range of conflicted, transitional and post-conflict settings.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$19,800

Tarducci, Monica Lucia del Valle

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Buenos Aires, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 1, 2013
Project Title: 
Tarducci, Dr. Monica Lucia del Valle, U. of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina - To aid 'I Coloquio Latinoamericano de Antropología Feminista,' 2013, U. of Buenos Aires, in collaboration with Dr. Deborah Edith Daich

'First Latin American Colloquium of Feminist Anthropologist (I CLAF)
August 22-23, 2013. U. Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Organizers: Dr. Mónica Tarducci (U. Buenos Aires), Dr. Deborah Daich (CONICET), and Victoria Keller

The First Latin American Colloquium of Feminist Anthropologists (I CLAF) brought together Latin American scholars to discuss and debate the challenges of academic production in this global world of changing political, cultural and economical contexts. Goals of the conference included bringing different research in dialogue with one another, reporting on the current progress and challenges of the discipline within the academic field in various countries, and debating the current contributions and tensions between feminist anthropology and anthropology, other social sciences, and the Latin American feminist movement. The colloquium was organized around four themes: 'Feminist Anthropology in a Global Context', 'Current Latin American Feminist Anthropology: What Happens in our Countries?', 'Feminist Anthropology, Women's Movement and Feminist Movement: Frictions and Articulations', and 'Feminist Anthropology and Public Policy: Contributions and Contradictions'. The panels were organized such that each established a dialogue between the panel to follow and the one that preceded it, foregrounding the complex articulations between feminist anthropology, women's and feminist movements, and the design and implementation of public policies in global contexts. One of the meeting's outcomes was a feminist anthropology network, created to further scholarly exchange between participants as well as promote opportunities for collaborative research.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$10,250

Cohen, Mark N.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York College, Plattsburgh, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 3, 2003
Project Title: 
Cohen, Dr. Mark N., Plattsburgh State U., Plattsburgh, NY - To aid conference on paleopathology at the origins of agriculture revisited, 2004, Peru, NY, in collaboration with Dr. George J. Armelagos and Dr. Gillian Crane-Kramer
Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Obeid, Michelle

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Manchester, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2014
Project Title: 
Obeid, Dr. Michelle, U. of Manchester, Manchester, UK - To aid workshop on 'Beyond State Failure: New Anthropological Perspectives on the Everyday State in Lebanon,' 2014, Beirut, Lebanon, in collaboration with Dr. Sami Hermez

Preliminary abstract: The workshop aims to critically unpack the taken-for-granted academic and mainstream discourses of 'state failure' that dominate understandings of political life in Lebanon. These discourses of the 'weak', 'incompetent' and 'the non-existent' state seem increasingly more ubiquitous two decades after the end of the Lebanese civil war (1975-1991). The state is held responsible for its inability to calibrate internal tensions and to ward off external pressures emanating from the country's deep entanglement with regional developments in the aftermath of the Arab protests. Yet, countering this, belief in the project of the state continues to consume the political imaginary and suggests a triumph of 'the idea' of the state. Bringing together an international group of anthropologists of Lebanon, the workshop aims to investigate 'the state' as an ethnographically emergent concept in a historical moment that is fraught with anxiety about the future of Lebanon and the region. We aim to invigorate the anti-statist approach that has overshadowed the recent anthropology of the state by expanding the theoretical scope of our research, thus exploring the intimate spaces in which the state comes to life (or fails to) in an ethnographically grounded approach that accounts for a yearning and desire for the state.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$18,100

Vilches, Flora

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chile, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2014
Project Title: 
Vilches, Dr. Flora, U. de Chile, Santiago, Chile - To aid '7th Meeting of Archaeological Theory in South America (TAAS),' 2014, San Felipe, Chile, in collaboration with Dr. Dante Angelo

Preliminary abstract: The TAAS (Teoría Arqueológica en América del Sur) was born from the need to discuss the specific situation of Latin American archaeologies and its positioning regarding global theoretical paradigms. The idea began to take shape in 1996 in Argentina, bringing together people from different Latin American universities, with the support of the World Archaeological Congress (WAC). The first meeting was held in 1998 in Brazil (also 2012), with subsequent versions in Argentina (twice), Colombia, and Venezuela. The 7th TAAS will be the first time for this event to take place on the Pacific coast of the continent. The TAAS aims to provide the chance to open a more democratic and critical engagement between professionals, students, and a burgeoning and diverse group of local stakeholders of the past, to achieve a better theoretical, ethical and practical framework for archaeological practice. We expect to have up to 350-400 participants, including students, junior and senior archaeologists and different stakeholders (mainly indigenous representatives) from several Latin American and other countries. Due to its nature, TAAS also welcomes the participation of specialists of related disciplinary fields whose work resonates with the interests of archaeology, promoting an open discussion on a variegated set of topics.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Doretti, Mercedes

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 18, 2005
Project Title: 
Doretti, Mercedes, Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team, Brooklyn, NY - To aid Third Annual Meeting of Latin American Association of Forensic Anthropologists (ALAF), 2005, Bogota, Colombia

In September 2005, ALAF held its third conference in Bogota, Colombia, organized by the newly formed non- governmental Colombian forensic anthropology team, EQUITAS. More than 170 forensic scientists, academics, anthropology and archaeology students, social psychologists accompanying forensic work, local human rights activists, Colombian prosecutors and lawyers, representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and representatives of the European Association of Forensic Anthropology (FASE) attended the five-day conference at National Museum in downtown Bogota. Fifty-eight papers and two posters were presented. Dr. Douglas Ubelaker from the Smithsonian Institute, USA gave a daylong workshop, 'Updating Forensic Anthropology Standards.' The papers presented at the meeting focused on six main topics: 1.) National and case examples showing the use of forensic sciences in the documentation of human rights violations and violations of humanitarian law; 2.) The relationship between government and non-governmental forensic teams and experts, and the different country origins of forensic anthropology; 3.) Initial research testing the application to national and/or regional context of standards and protocols for ,; forensic work based on population and contexts outside the region; 4.) The need for accreditation in Latin America for forensic anthropologists and archaeologists; 5.) The need to expand training and higher educational opportunities for Latin American forensic anthropologists, to enlarge inter-institutional agreements; and 6.) The development of an annual journal and other ALAF publications, summarizing regional work.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$14,805
Syndicate content