Patino Contreras, Alejandro

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Inst. Colombiana de Antro. e Hist.
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
July 11, 2007
Project Title: 
Patino Contreras, Alejandro, Instituto Colombiano de Antropologia e Historia, Bogata, Colombia- To aid training in archaeology at U. of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, sponsored by Kathryn Reese
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$17,500

Swenson, Edward Rueben

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Lethbridge, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Swenson, Dr. Edward R., U. of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada - To aid research on 'Ritual, Household, and the Politics of Space in Canoncillio, Peru'

DR. EDWARD SWENSON, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Ritual, Household, and the Politics of Space in Cañoncillo, Peru.' Archaeological fieldwork at Cañoncillo in the Jequetepeque Valley has yielded valuable data to aid interpretations of ritual politics, domestic life, and urbanization in ancient Peru. The replication of iconic architectural forms and the strict standardization of ritual performance at the Gallinazo center of Jatanca constitute significant discoveries of the excavation program. Equivalent ceremonies, following a comparable spatial sequence and temporal structure, were staged in all five of the principal Jatanca compounds. The duplication of ceremonial space implies a 'competition between stages' and the existence of an ethos of political pluralism at Jatanca. At the same time, this pluralism was tempered by a singular ideology predicated on invariant ('orthodox') modes of ritual spectacle. Jatanca's built environment points to the possible existence of semi-autonomous, stratified parcialidades confederated into a larger moral community. The archaeological evidence further indicates that ritual performance, residence, production, and consumption were much more rigidly compartmentalized and spatially segregated at Jatanca than at later Moche sites of the hinterland. Finally, archaeological research conducted at the neighboring center of Huaca Colorada reveals that the physical association of domestic and ceremonial architecture changed dramatically between the Gallinazo and Moche Periods, suggesting fundamental transformations in urban sociopolitical structures.

Publication credit:

Swenson, Edward. 2012. Warfare, Gender, and Sacrifice in Jequetepeque, Peru. Latin American Antiquity 23(2):167-193.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$24,980

Acuto, Felix Alejandro

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
CONICET
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 19, 2007
Project Title: 
Acuto, Felix, CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina and Troncoso Melendez, Andres, U. of Chile, Santiago- To aid collaborative research on 'Inca Ritual Activities and Landscapes in the Southern Andes'

Publication Credits:

Acuto, Félix A. 2011. Encuentros Coloniales, Heterodoxia y Ortodoxia en el Valle Calchaqui Norte Bajo El Dominio Inka. Estudios Atacamenios. 42:5-32.

Acuto, Felix A. 2012. Landscapes of Inequality, Spectacle, and Control: Inka Social Order in Provincial Contexts. Revista de Antropologia 25(1):9-64.

Acuto, Félix A., Andrés Troncoso, and Alejandro Ferrari. 2012. Recognizing Strategies for Conquered Territories: A Case Study from the Inka North Calchaqui Valley. Antiquity 86: 1141-1154.

Acuto, Félix A., Marina Smith, and Ezequiel Gilardenghi. 2011. Reenhebrando El Pasado: Hacia Una Epistemologia de la Materialidad. Boletin del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino 16(2):9-26.

Andrés Troncoso, Daniel Pavlovic, Félix Acuto, Rodrigo Sánchez, A. César González-García. 2012. Complejo Arquitectonico Cerro Mercachas: Arquitectura y Ritualidad Incaica en Chile Central. Revista Espanola de Anthropologia Americana 42(2):293-319

Acuto, Felix A., Marisa Kergaravat, and Claudia Amuedo. 2014. Death, Personhood, and Relatedness in the South Andes a Thousand Years Ago. Journal of Material Culture 19(3):303-326

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$34,850

Bruno, Maria Christina

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 27, 2003
Project Title: 
Bruno, Maria C., Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid research on 'Agricultural Intensification and Formative Period Society: An Ethnobotanical and Paleoethnobotanical Approach,' supervised by Dr. David L. Browman

MARIA C. BRUNO, while a student at Washington University in St. Louis, was awarded a grant in October 2003 to aid in research on agricultural intensification and its role in the development of complex societies during the Formative period (1500B.C. - A.D.500) in the southern Lake Titicaca Basin of the Andes. The research included an ethnobotanical study of present-day agricultural practices on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia, and a paleoethnobotanical study of plant remains from Formative period sites in the same region. The ethnobotanical field work provided insight into small-scale intensification processes (particularly weeding, tilling, and fertilizing), characteristics of soils and their productivity in relation to weather patterns, and social aspects of agricultural production. Extensive plant collections provided the link between the ethnobotanical observations and the archaeological plant record. Throughout the paleoethnobotanical analysis, the reference collection has facilitated identification of species that are associated with past agricultural and food practices, such as small-scale processes of intensification, changes in land use related to climate change, and the importance of local agricultural food products in early ceremonial contexts. Results from submitted AMS radiocarbon dates on identified carbonized remains will permit the researcher to track the timing of these agricultural trends and relate them to concomitant changes in climate and social complexity.

Publication Credit:

Bruno, Maria C. 2014. Beyond Raised Fields: Exploring Farming Practices and Processes of Agricultural Change in the Ancient Lake Titicaca Basin of the Andes. American Anthropologist 116(1):130-145.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$8,605

Greaves, Russell D.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, San Antonio, U. of
Status: 
Lapsed Grant
Approve Date: 
June 23, 2004
Project Title: 
Greaves, Dr. Russell D., U. of Texas, San Antonio, TX - To aid research on 'Ethnoarchaeology from Village to Museum: Behavioral Ecology of Pume Material Culture'
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$17,260

Kohut, Lauren Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Vanderbilt U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 19, 2012
Project Title: 
Kohut, Lauren Elizabeth, Vanderbilt U., Nashville, TN - To aid research on 'The Political Landscape of War: Late Pre-Hispanic Fortifications in the Colca Valley, Peru,' supervised by Dr. Steven A. Wernke

LAUREN E. KOHUT, then a student at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, was awarded a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'The Political Landscape of War: Late Pre-Hispanic Fortifications in the Colca Valley, Peru,' supervised by Dr. Steven A. Wernke. The Late Intermediate Period (LIP; 1000-1400 CE) in the highland Andes of Peru has been defined as a time of heightened conflict and political fragmentation. Prior archaeological research on this period has focused on regional-scale surveys, which indeed show a largely fragmented political landscape. But while this characterization may be relevant at a regional scale, it overlooks the more local patterns of integration and affiliation that formed the basis of daily life for communities during the LIP. This research combines micro-regional survey of fortifications, systematic surface collection, and targeted excavation of a single fortified settlement to examine the meso and local scale interactions that have been absent from prior research on conflict during this period. Spatial analysis of defensive settlement patterns in the valley suggests local groups formed local alliance clusters that may have been integrated into a valley-wide alliance network. In addition to serving the defensive needs of individuals in the valley, fortifications provided a new context for community formation that existed in spite of, or more likely because of, regional fragmentation.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$19,286

Politis, Gustavo Gabriel

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
La Plata, National U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2010
Project Title: 
Politis, Dr. Gustavo Gabriel, U. National de la Plata, La Plata, Argentina - To aid research on 'Mounds, Maize, and 'Caciques' in the Upper Delta of the Paranñá River, Argentina'

DR. GUSTAVO POLITIS, Universdad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina, was awarded funding in May 2010 to aid research on 'Mounds, Maize and 'Caciques' in the Upper Delta of the Paraná River (Argentina).' The project focused on four main topics: 1) the southernmost presence of Lowland pre-Hispanic horticulture based on the starch content of ceramic and lithic tools, which helped determine the dispersal of continentally widespread cultigens such as corn (Zea mays) and beans (Phaseolus spp.) in addition to the identification of the use of wild resources, such as algarrobo (Proposis nigra), which had not been previously recorded in the area; 2) analysis of the human-made earthen mounds ( 'cerritos'), which allowed the identification of a 'pre-mound' occupation as well as evidence of cultural activities, such as mound construction, between ca. 1000-500 BP; 3) the development of low-level social hierarchies among foragers and small-scale horticulturists; and 4) the southern expansion of the Guaraní people and their relationship with local indigenous groups. The results obtained contribute to the archaeology and anthropology of the Delta of the Paraná River, an area which will likely play a crucial role in understanding a variety cultural processes and population dynamics in the South American Lowlands.

Publication Credit:

Bonomo, Mariano, Gustavo Politis, and Camila Gianotti. 2011. Montículos, Jerarquía Social y Horticultura en las Sociedade Indígenas del Delta del Río Paraná (Argentina). Latin American Antiquity 22(3):297-333.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$19,980

Swenson, Edward Rueben

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Toronto, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Swenson, Dr. Edward Reuben, U. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada - To aid research 'The Politics of Time and Space at Huaca Colorada, Jequetepeque Peru'

Preliminary abstract: A Wenner-Gren Foundation grant would permit analysis of a recently discovered Transitional/Early Lambayeque period occupation (AD 800-950) at the Late Moche religious center of Huaca Colorada in the southern Jequetepeque Valley, Peru. The contexts include a large feasting midden, an adjacent domestic area, and ceremonial architecture built in the predominately Moche-period monumental zone of the site (AD 650-800). Our research will test whether the onset of the Transitional Period and the likely adoption of new religious ideologies translated to shifts in the periodicities of practice and rituals of social memory at Huaca Colorada. Therefore, the proposed research is designed to shed light on the social impact of the 'collapse' of Moche political theology in the region. It also aims to develop more sophisticated archaeological methods for explaining historical process. In fact, profound sociopolitical disjunctures are often directly related to changes in the temporalities of practice and the ideological regulation of time itself, and our research will examine how changing depositional practices possibly underwrote alterations in the pace and tempo of everyday life. In addition, the project stands to make important contributions to anthropological research on the interrelationships of religious and political change. Ideological innovations, often related to social unrest or environmental perturbations, have the potential to disrupt longstanding cultural dispositions, leading to new material realities and naturalizing novel experiences of time and place. Ultimately, we plan to investigate the degree to which the collapse of the Moche ideological complex affected everyday routines and social practices in the southern Jequetepeque Valley.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Alconini, Sonia

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Texas, San Antonio, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 9, 2012
Project Title: 
Alconini, Dr. Sonia, U. of Texas, San Antonio, TX - To aid workshop on 'The South-Central Montane Forest and Adjacent Areas: Regional Political Developments, Inter-regional Exchange and Cultural Interaction,' 2013, Bolivia

'The South-Central Montane Forest and Adjacent Areas: Regional Political Developments, Inter-regional Exchange and Cultural Interaction'
July 22-28, 2013, Sucre, Bolivia
Organizer: Sonia Alconini (U. Texas at San Antonio)

The aim of this workshop was to discuss the current status of archaeological research in the south-central tropical mountains of South America and their importance in the development of sociopolitical complexity in the nearby Andes and tropical lowlands. This region, also known as Yunga and Jungla Tucumana further north, is often described as an 'uninhabitable,' marginal territory. Challenging such assumptions, the workshop goals were: 1) to illuminate the nature and evolution of the distinct political trajectories and cultural traditions that developed in the south-central tropical mountains; 2) to understand the nature of the agrarian systems in such Yunga environments; 3) to examine the political development of populations in the nearby temperate valleys; and 4) to assess the nature of the distinct spheres of interaction and circulation of goods, symbols, and peoples that crossed this ecological spectrum. Thanks to the support of the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the Universidad Mayor de San Francisco Xavier, sixteen scholars who work on the region were brought to Bolivia. Papers were circulated online prior to the workshop to facilitate discussion, and twenty-two presentations were made. The results exceeded organizers' expectations, considering the different scopes, methodologies, and theoretical orientations present at the meeting, and plans to have the proceedings published are underway.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Cantarutti, Gabriel Eduardo

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 3, 2010
Project Title: 
Cantarutti, Gabriel Eduardo, U. of Illinois, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Inca Mining Operations and Imperial Control in the Los Infieles Region, North-Central Chile,' supervised by Dr. Brian S. Bauer

GABRIEL E. CANTARUTTI, then a student at University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in May 2010 to aid research on 'Inca Mining Operations and Imperial Control in the Los Infieles Region, North-Central Chile,' supervised by Dr. Brian S. Bauer. This project studied the organization and imperial control of the mining complex of Los Infieles in north-central Chile during the Inca Period (ca. AD 1450-1541). An archaeological survey was conducted in the Los Infieles area (50 km2) of a twelve-month period. This survey revealed the existence of a large mining complex focused mainly on the extraction of opaline silica and chrysocolla. The materials registered during the survey suggest that each of the five mining clusters recorded at Los Infieles included at least one large site, in which similar operational sequences of mining activities were conducted. The absence of lapidary workshop remains and the small size of the remaining sorted minerals at the sites also suggest that the final products obtained from the mining operations were high-quality granule and pebble-size minerals. The large number of mines and their associated facilities across the Los Infieles region support the idea that during the Inca Period, chrysocolla and opaline silica had much greater economic value than scholars tend to think, at least at an imperial provincial level. The evidence collected thus far also suggests that the Inca state was significantly involved in sponsoring and supporting these mining operations.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000
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