Miotti, Laura L.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Museo de la Plata
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 19, 2010
Project Title: 
Miotti, Dr. Laura L., Museo de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina - To aid conference on 'Early Man in America: A Hundred Years from the Ameghino-Hrdlicka Debate (1910-2010),' 2010, U. Nacional de La Plata, in collaboration with Dr. Monica Cira Salemme

Preliminary abstract: The International Symposium 'Early Man in America' was held in August 2002 for the first time in Mexico D.F. Since then the meeting was celebrated every two years in the same country and has gained a great interest among very well known researchers and specialists in the topic on Peopling of the Americas, from Mexico and other countries as well. Presentations and the visit to archaeological sites were great motivations for stimulating the discussion on this subject. This time, the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Museum of La Plata offers the possibility of a new edition of this event, this time celebrating 100 years of the debate about the antiquity of man in America between F. Ameghino and A. Hrdlicka. The aim is to seek in the history of these scientific ideas a framework for positioning the present state of knowledge --theoretical and methodological tendencies in different countries- and to know the academic and extra-academic impact that this topic has in the present complex, heterogeneous society, where the claim of material and intangible culture is increasing and, whereas the request of identity goes up in relationship with the remote past.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Schauer, Matthew Philip

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Illinois, Chicago, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2009
Project Title: 
Schauer, Matthew Philip, U. of Illinois, Chicago, IL - To aid research on 'Warfare on the Inca Frontier: Fortification, Imperialism, and Interaction on the Frontier in Northern Ecuador,' supervised by Dr. Lawrence Harold Keeley

MATTHEW SCHAUER, then a student at University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, received funding in April 2009 to aid research on 'Warfare on the Inca Frontier: Fortification, Imperialism, and Interaction on the Frontier in Northern Ecuador,' supervised by Dr. Lawrence Keeley. In the northern Ecuadorian highlands, the Inca constructed fourteen fortifications at Pambamarca to subjugate a local chiefdom called the Cayambe. These sites are clustered together yet vary in the number of walls, structures, defensives, and size. The purpose of this dissertation project was to explain the variability and clustering of these sites and determine the types of activities that took place. This study was carried out in three phases. The first phase was survey using a combination of methods to establish a typology identifying a three-tier hierarchy of fortress sites. The next phase of research involved a systematic test sampling program from the three types. The purpose of this phase was to determine the density and distribution of occupation across a site. The final phase involved larger excavation units to expose what type of activities were happening at these sites, the sequence of occupation and who exactly was occupying these sites. Preliminary results suggest that different types fulfilled different roles. The imperial strategy of the Pambamarca complex of fortifications appears to have functioned as a complex network of imperial garrisons meant to prevent incursions from across the frontier with smaller sites serving as watchtowers for mutual support and defense.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$23,105

Abraham, Sarah Jane

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Santa Barbara, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 27, 2006
Project Title: 
Abraham, Sarah Jane, U. of California, Santa Barbara, CA - To aid research on 'Provincial Life in the Inca Empire: Continuity and Change at Hatun Lucanas, Peru,' supervised by Dr. Katharina Jeanne Schreiber

SARAH J. ABRAHAM, then a student at the University of California, Santa Barbara, California, received funding in April 2006 to aid research on 'Provincial Life in the Inca Empire: Continuity and Change at Hatun Lucanas, Peru,' supervised by Dr. Katharina J. Schreiber. This project investigates the imperial-provincial relationship between the Inca empire (AD 1438-1532) and the people of Hatun Lucanas in the southern highlands of Peru. Funding supported excavation, detailed mapping, and architectural analysis, and laboratory analysis were conducted to better understand the transition from autonomous polity to subjugated population. Excavations at Hatun Lucanas targeted residential compounds to expose domestic contexts and their associated artifacts and architectural elements. Those data were then used to identify changes in local political, economic, and social organization after Inca conquest. Preliminary observations suggest that this project provides the first documentation of Lucanas material culture including pottery styles, architectural canons, and mortuary practices. Additionally, data reveal a shift in local political organization with the emergence of local elites after Inca conquest. Finally, changes were detected in the local economy during the Late Horizon. Excavations uncovered evidence of textile production and metalworking at Hatun Lucanas as well as an intensification in processing, likely of food, metals, or pigments. Ongoing analysis will provide additional lines of evidence with which to reconstruct the nature and magnitude of imperialism at the local level.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$22,100

Wernke, Steven A.

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 8, 2005
Project Title: 
Wernke, Dr. Steven A., U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC - To aid 'Andean Interfaces: An Archaeo-History of Community, State, and Landscape in the Peruvian Highlands' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

STEVEN A WERNKE, Vanderbilt University, received a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2006 to support research and writing on 'Andean Interfaces: An Archaeo-History of Community, State, and Landscape in the Peruvian Highlands'. The book (under contract, University Press of Florida) integrates archaeological and ethnohistorical research to produce a local-scale view of the negotiation and transformation of community and land-use organization during terminal prehispanic and early colonial times in the Colca Valley of southern Peru. It traces the development of the regionally important Collagua ethnic polity and explores how local Inka provincial administrative centers grafted onto local communities, how such provincial outposts were transformed into missionary outposts during early colonial times, and how a subsequent viceroyalty-wide resettlement program in the 1570s built upon and transformed local conceptions and features of community and landscape. Through Geographical Information System-based analysis of a series of Spanish colonial administrative surveys in the Colca Valley, Andean Interfaces presents a detailed reconstruction of early colonial land tenure patterns, which are used to interpret pre- and post-Hispanic patterns of settlement, political organization, and land use. The fellowship also supported the publication of journal articles for American Anthropologist, the International Journal of Historical Archaeology, and two edited volume chapters. Two further journal articles near completion were initiated with the support of this fellowship.

Publication Credit:

Wernke, Steven A. 2007. Negotiating Community and Landscape In the Peruvian Andes: A Transconquest View. American Anthropologist 109(1):130-152.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$15,600

Bray, Tamara L.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Wayne State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 20, 2008
Project Title: 
Bray, Dr. Tamara L., Wayne State U., Detroit, MI; and Echeverria Almeida, Mr. Jose, Fondo de Salvamento del Patrimonio Cultural, Canton Ibarra, Ecuador - To aid collaborative research on 'Imperial Inca Statecraft and the Architecture of Power'

DR. TAMARA L. BRAY, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, and JOSE ECHEVERRIA ALMEIDA, Fondo de Salvamento del Patrimonio Cultural, Canton Ibarra, Ecuador, were awarded an International Collaborative Research Grant in October 2008, to aid collaborative research on 'Imperial Inca Statecraft and the Architecture of Power.' The focus of this project was the late imperial site of Inca-Caranqui located in the northern Ecuadorian highlands. Situated at the northernmost edge of the Inca Empire, this site is believed to constitute the last imperial construction episode prior to the Spanish invasion. The aim of the project was to explore the role of imperial architecture as a material strategy of Inca statecraft and reveal how such strategies evolved as a function of time and distance from the imperial capital of Cuzco. Using a combination of archaeological, ethnohistoric, and remote-sensing techniques, it was possible to precisely document the main architectural features at the site, create an architectural plan of the site layout, gain insight into the kinds of activities that occurred within the ceremonial core of the site, and establish the presence of a significant earlier Caranqui occupation at the site. These data provide the baseline for the comparative study with Inca installations closer to the heartland and from earlier phases of empire that offer insight into evolving state interests, local dynamics, and imperial innovation. The training component of the project, comprising a two-week seminar on archaeological site conservation, was conducted in collaboration with the INPC, well-attended, and resulted in a practical conservation plan for the site of Inca-Caranqui.

Publication Credit:

Bray, Tamara L. 2013. Water, Ritual, And Power in the Inca Empire. Latin American Antiquity 24(2):164-190.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$33,520

Duke, Guy Stephen

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Toronto, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 8, 2013
Project Title: 
Duke, Guy Stephen, U. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada - To aid research on 'Consuming Identities: Culinary Practice in the Late Moche Jequetepeque Valley, Peru,' supervised by Dr. Edward Rueben Swenson

GUY S. DUKE, then a graduate student at University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, received funding in April 2013 to aid research on 'Consuming Identities: Culinary Practice in the Late Moche Jequetepeque Valley, Peru,' supervised by Dr. Edward R. Swenson. The archaeological study of culinary practices provides an excellent point of entry to investigate everything from status and ethnicity to group and individual identity. This project was designed to shed light on the cultural politics of food preparation and consumption within the specific context of sociopolitical and environmental transformations distinguishing the Late Moche Period (AD 600-850) in the Jequetepeque Valley. The 2013 field season investigated a rural site on the north side of the valley (Je-64) for comparison with previously excavated data from the large ceremonial centre of Huaca Colorada on the south side of the valley. Preliminary results from Je-64 indicate that the site was composed of seven discrete sectors including two residential/domestic areas and a ritual core marked by differential architecture and ceramic and lithic assemblages. Food remains revealed the presence of llama, cuy, maize, squash, beans, peppers (ají), guava, and potato. The preliminary evidence suggests that distinct 'culinary packages' shaped the experience and perception of different places at Je-64 and Huaca Colorada. The data from both sites are beginning to point to the existence of multiple corporate and individual identities during the Late Moche period in the Jequetepeque Valley.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$16,901

Klarich, Elizabeth A.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 22, 2008
Project Title: 
Klarich, Dr. Elizabeth A., Cotsen Inst (UCLA), Santa Monica, CA; and Flores Blanco, Luis A., Puno, Peru - To aid collaborative research on 'Evaluating Early Urbanism at Pukara, Peru'

Preliminary abstract: Funding is requested to support a collaborative archaeological research project in the Lake Titicaca Basin of Peru that includes (1) a field project at the site of Pukara, Department of Puno, and (2) a training component for Peruvian undergraduate students focused on local site museum development. First, the field project consists of two months of mapping and excavations within two major areas at the site--the central district and the site periphery--to evaluate models for why and how Pukara developed into the first regional center in the northern Lake Titicaca Basin during the Late Formative Period (500 BC- AD 400). The mapping and excavations will be co-directed by the ICRG co-applicants, Elizabeth Klarich and Luis Angel Flores Blanco, Andean archaeologists with distinct perspectives based on their regional field experience, academic training, and specific research interests. After the conclusion of the field project, recovered materials will be inventoried, analyzed, and curated. The co-applicants will work jointly in all stages of the field project, including publication of findings in both Spanish and English. Secondly, the proposed training component provides an opportunity for four undergraduate students to develop a permanent exhibit documenting prehistoric and modern pottery production within the Museo Lítico Pukara.

Publication Credit:

Klarich, Elizabeth. 2014. Crafting, Community, and Collaboration: Reflections on the Ethnographic Sala Project at the Pukara Lithic Museum, Peru. Museum Anthropology 37(2):118-132

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$34,655

Moore, Jerry D.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California State U., Dominguez Hills
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2009
Project Title: 
Moore, Dr. Jerry D., California State U. Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA - To aid workshop on 'Divergent Trajectories to Prehistoric Social Complexity in the Equatorial Andes: Un Taller Móvil,' 2010, Quito, Ecuador, in collaboration with Dr. Francisco Valdez

'Divergent Trajectories towards Social Complexity: Formative Transformations in the Equatorial Andes'
July 1-17, 2010, Ecuador and Peru (multiple locations)
Organizers: Jerry D. Moore (California State U. Dominguez Hills) and Francisco Valdez (Institute de Recherche pour la Développement)

This workshop brought together Peruvian and Ecuadorian archaeologists investigating the prehistoric origins of social complexity and settled village life in the equatorial Andes of southern Ecuador and northern Peru. These Formative societies apparently were broadly contemporary (circa 3000 - 1000 BCE), independent, but interacting-resulting in a complex mosaic of archaeological patterns on both sides of the international border between Peru and Ecuador. Rather than a conventional conference, this seminar occurred at multi-sited venues over 2500 km-archaeological sites, museums, research labs and field stations-where archaeologists could examine and discuss artifactual materials and sites first-hand. In addition, a series of events were held in La Libertad and Cuenca, Ecuador, and in Tumbes and Piura, Peru; these four seminars were open to the public, and were attended by more than 300 people. The workshop also established the ground-work for future, binational collaborative archaeological research and heritage management programs such as field investigations, publications, and the establishment of a moderated Web page to support the continued exchange of scientific information between Peruvian and Ecuadorian archaeologists.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,290

Scullin, Dianne Mackenzie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Columbia U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2010
Project Title: 
Scullin, Dianne Mackenzie, Columbia U., New York, NY - To aid research on 'A Materiality of Sound: Musical Practices of the Moche of Peru,' supervised by Dr. Terence D'Altroy

DIANNE MACKENZIE SCULLIN, then a student at Columbia University, New York, New York, was awarded a grant in May 2010, to aid research on 'A Materiality of Sound: Musical Practices of the Moche of Peru,' supervised by Dr. Terence D'Altroy. The objectives of the project are to investigate the relationships between the material and the ephemeral and to evaluate the feasibility of researching sound in past societies utilizing archaeological techniques. The musical practices of the Moche of Peru, who flourished on the north coast of Peru from 100 to 800 AD, provide the ideal case study for the investigation of sound in the past. The initial stage of this project involved the collection of data from a variety of sources. Over nine months, from November 2010 to August 2011, this project completed acoustic maps of three different Moche sites consisting of over 3,000 individual data points and created a database of Moche musical instruments containing 923 entries and 470 sound recordings. The data from the musical instruments and iconography provides information concerning the levels of cohesiveness of the Moche soundscape both geographically and temporally. The acoustic maps provide insight into the spatial arrangement and organization of sites, demonstrating the inclusiveness or exclusiveness of performance spaces. The techniques and methods utilized for this project demonstrate the feasibility of investigating sound in the past and provide low-impact solutions to investigating sound in any archaeological context.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$14,985

Acuto, Felix Alejandro

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
CONICET
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 19, 2007
Project Title: 
Acuto, Felix, CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina and Troncoso Melendez, Andres, U. of Chile, Santiago- To aid collaborative research on 'Inca Ritual Activities and Landscapes in the Southern Andes'

Publication Credits:

Acuto, Félix A. 2011. Encuentros Coloniales, Heterodoxia y Ortodoxia en el Valle Calchaqui Norte Bajo El Dominio Inka. Estudios Atacamenios. 42:5-32.

Acuto, Felix A. 2012. Landscapes of Inequality, Spectacle, and Control: Inka Social Order in Provincial Contexts. Revista de Antropologia 25(1):9-64.

Acuto, Félix A., Andrés Troncoso, and Alejandro Ferrari. 2012. Recognizing Strategies for Conquered Territories: A Case Study from the Inka North Calchaqui Valley. Antiquity 86: 1141-1154.

Acuto, Félix A., Marina Smith, and Ezequiel Gilardenghi. 2011. Reenhebrando El Pasado: Hacia Una Epistemologia de la Materialidad. Boletin del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino 16(2):9-26.

Andrés Troncoso, Daniel Pavlovic, Félix Acuto, Rodrigo Sánchez, A. César González-García. 2012. Complejo Arquitectonico Cerro Mercachas: Arquitectura y Ritualidad Incaica en Chile Central. Revista Espanola de Anthropologia Americana 42(2):293-319

Acuto, Felix A., Marisa Kergaravat, and Claudia Amuedo. 2014. Death, Personhood, and Relatedness in the South Andes a Thousand Years Ago. Journal of Material Culture 19(3):303-326

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$34,850
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