Smith, Andrew B.

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cape Town, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
May 3, 2001
Project Title: 
University of Cape Town Fund, Inc., New York, NY - To aid Wenner-Gren Fellowship at U. of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa, to support the training of black southern Africans in archaeology, supervised by Dr. Andrew Smith
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$5,950

Leone, Mark P.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Maryland, College Park, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 17, 2009
Project Title: 
Leone, Dr. Mark P., U. of Maryland, Collage Park, MD - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with McKeldin Library, University of Maryland, College Park, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,915

Adair, Mary J.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Kansas, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
September 22, 2014
Project Title: 
Adair, Dr. Mary, U. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS - To aid preparation of the research materials of Dr. Robert Squier for archival deposit with the Biodiversity Institute (formerly Museum of Anthropology) at the U. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS - Historical Archives
Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$14,521

Villeneuve, Suzanne Natascha

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Victoria, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 18, 2008
Project Title: 
Villeneuve, Suzanne N., U. of Victoria, BC, Canada - To aid workshop on 'Archaeological and Anthropological Perspectives on Ritual Spaces and Sacred Places,' 2012, Simon Fraser U., Burnaby, BC, in collaboration with Dr. Brian D. Hayden

Preliminary Abstract: The research encompassed by this workshop is fundamental to understanding the role of ritual activities in the emergence of socioeconomic inequalities and political complexity in village-level (transegalitarian) ethnographic and prehistoric societies. This workshop will first document the range of ethnographic village-level ritual activities and then develop models to understand the role of ritual in community dynamics. Although ritual activity in transegalitarian societies has been implicated in the creation of socioeconomic inequalities and political power, theoretical models of the kinds of rituals, the motivations for creating them, and the means by which they promote inequalities are poorly developed for transegalitarian societies (with a few notable exceptions such as ancestor worship). There is no general synthesis of ritual activity at this level of organization. Moreover, for archaeologists, there is as yet little ethnographic or archaeological information on how such activities can be identified at transegalitarian levels. Thus, in this workshop, we will focus on what purposes rituals serve in relation to social, political, and economic dynamics of transegalitarian communities, and how these aspects can be identified archaeologically.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$14,628

McNamee, Calla

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Tennessee, Knoxville, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 17, 2011
Project Title: 
McNamee, Ms. Calla, U. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN - To aid conference on 'Developing International Geoarchaeology (DIG),' 2011, U. of Tennessee, in collaboration with Dr. Boyce N. Driskell

Preliminary abstract: The 5th periodic Developing International Geoarchaeology (DIG) conference will be held at University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tennessee from 27 September to 1 October, 2011. DIG is the only conference series dedicated to the promotion of international collegiality within the field of geoarchaeology and provides a venue for international researchers to present and discuss a broad range of geoarchaeological topics. Geoarchaeology is multidisciplinary and utilizes the methods and concepts of the earth sciences to better understand human culture. Through the application of geomorphology, soil sciences, sedimentology, petrography and archaeometry, geoarchaeologists address questions pertaining to land use practices, human-environmental interactions, landscape reconstruction, site formation processes, and trade and exchange. Although the methodologies within the earth sciences are theoretically universal, their applications vary depending upon local geomorphic, environmental, and archaeological contexts. By pulling together researchers from multiple regions, DIG promotes dialogue on new and alternative approaches to geoarchaeological problems.
As the field of geoarchaeology matures, it is moving beyond simply the application of geological techniques to archaeological problems, and developing its own body of theory and method. The overarching goal of the conference is therefore to promote this development by facilitating research and stimulating discussion amongst a wide range of geoarchaeologists. The participation of international researchers is integral to the success and directive of DIG. The Wenner-Gren conference grant will provide essential funding to support international attendance.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Bird, Elizabeth

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
South Florida, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 9, 2006
Project Title: 
Bird, Dr. Elizabeth, U. of South Florida, Tampa, FL - To aid conference of SfAA on 'Global Insecurities, Global Solutions, and Applied Anthropology,' 2007, Tampa

'Collaborative Solutions to Global Insecurities: Challenges, Opportunities, and Potential'
March 27 - April 1, 2007, Downtown Hyatt Hotel, Tampa, Florida
Organizer: Dr. Elizabeth Bird (University of South Florida)

The grant supported a special session at the meetings of the Society for Applied Anthropology. The panel focused on three ongoing international partnerships between research teams at the University of South Florida and collaborators in three countries - Honduras, Lesotho, and Ecuador. Each collaboration involves work on a pressing global issue - land use and cultural heritage; HIV/AIDS intervention; and the social impact of natural disasters. The session focused not on results but on the process of effectively building such partnerships, with participants sharing ideas and strategies with audience members. As well as the lessons learned from the discussion at the event, all three teams agreed that the session acted as a catalyst to park ideas, and has had a significant role in taking all three to another level of effective collaboration, with several major grant proposals resulting.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Ndiema, Emmanuel Kimuma

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National Museums of Kenya
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
October 7, 2004
Project Title: 
Ndiema, Emmanuel K., National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya - To aid training in archaeology at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, supervised by Dr. John W.K. Harris
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Dever, Alejandro

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pittsburgh, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
October 4, 2005
Project Title: 
Dever, Alejandro, U. des los Andes, Bogota, Colombia - To aid dissertation write-up in archaeology at the U. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, supervised by Dr. Robert Drennan.
Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Rafferty, Janet

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Mississippi State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 31, 2011
Project Title: 
Rafferty, Dr. Janet, Mississippi State U., Mississippi State, Mississippi - To aid workshop on 'SAARAS: Systematic Assessment And Reform of Archaeological Systematics,' 2012, Mississippi State U., Starkville, in collaboration with Dr. Kevin Nolan

'Systematic Assessment and Reform of Archaeological Systematics (SAARAS)'
April 16-18, 2012, Mississippi State University, Starkeville, Mississippi
Organizers: Dr. Janet Rafferty (Mississippi State U.) & Dr. Kevin Nolan (Ball State U.)

It is increasingly evident that most current archaeological systems of classification, initially developed in the mid-twentieth century, are inadequate to address important questions in modern archaeology. In the last fifty years there have been many changes in the ways in which the archaeological record is approached and the kinds of questions being addressed. Since the 1960s there has been a proliferation of theoretical approaches, however there has been little change in the units used in analyses. This problem was recognized by Binford in his critique of the normative approach to culture in the 1960s but, by and large, subsequent systematics retained the old normative units. As a result many of the systems in wide use comprise bundles of formal attributes with discrete space-time distributions. While it has been recognized regularly, and for some time-that such units create artificial patterns in the history interpreted out of the record-there has not been a sustained, systematic assessment and reform of archaeological classification. In most regions, the old classes continue to do the work of the 'new' archaeology. If all systems of classification are designed for a particular purpose, then the discipline needs to reassess its systematics. Toward this end, the SAARAS conference sought to: 1) examine the extent of the problem represented by uncritical use of inherited typological units of space-time and bundled formal content; 2) discuss alternative approaches to analytical classification that consider the various dimensions of the archaeological record as independent and free to vary; 3) examine case studies of successful applications of new classificatory systems; and 4) discuss prospects and strategies for moving the discipline towards a more dynamic use of systematics in the exploration of dynamic systems.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$12,650