Sealy, Judith Clare

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cape Town, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
March 9, 2004
Project Title: 
University of Cape Town Fund, Inc., New York, NY- To aid Wenner-Gren Fellowship at the U. of Cape Town, South Africa, to support the training of black southern Africans in archaeology, supervised by Dr. Judith Sealy
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$9,000

Lopez, Carlos E.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
Lopez, Dr. Carlos, U. Tecnologica de Pereira, Pereira, Colombia - To aid ' VI International Symposium on Early Man in America: Peopling, Modeling and Approaches from the Tropics,' 2012, Pereira, in collaboration with Martha Cano

Preliminary abstract: The International Symposium 'Early Man in America' was held in August 2002 for the first time in Mexico D.F. Since then the meeting was celebrated every two years in the same country and has gained a great interest among very well known researchers and specialists in the topic on Peopling of the Americas, from Mexico and other countries as well. Presentations and the visit to archaeological sites were great motivations for stimulating the discussion on this subject. The 6th edition will be held in novembre, 2012 in Colombia. Hosted by the Cultural Coffee Landscape (Included in June 2011 in the UNESCO World Heritage list), its Universities, and the Gold Museum in Armenia, will be a remarkable experience for all academics attending the conference. Considering the tropical environment for the meeting, it is the time to introduce strong references to the role of tropical lands played in the early peopling of the Americas. The aim is to bring together scientific from different countries, and to present current advances related to archaeoly, geology, geomorphology,paleoenvironments, paleoclimates, models on American peopling, molecular anthropology, paleopathologies, etc. The meeting will consist of three days of discussions in an academic environment. Three fieldtrips, to archaeological sites nearby, pre and post symposium are offered, demonstrating the big diference in the tropical environment, related to subtropics, and the expresion in the early archaeological record in sites with a quite characteristic soils and conservation.
We expect to strenght academic dialogue among scientists working in the early peopling of the Americas, but also to acknowledge the pioners, and scholars whose labor has an important influence in the present state of knowledge --theoretical and methodological tendencies in different countries-.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Andersson Strand, Eva

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Copenhagen, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2013
Project Title: 
Andersson Strand, Dr. Eva, U. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark - To aid workshop on 'Traditional Textile Craft: An Intangible Cultural Heritage?,' 2014, Jordan Museum, Amman, Jordan, in collaboration with Dr. Jihad Kafaki

Preliminary abstract: Textile craft and textile design have always had an important social, cultural and economic impact on both individuals and societies. The cultural heritage of textiles does not end with the preservation and collection of costumes and other textiles in museums. It includes living traditions inherited from our ancestors and passed on to our descendants; knowledge and skills to produce traditional crafts; and the language and terminologies used to describe both the activities and the material outcomes. Cloth and clothing have always been of interest to anthropologists and archaeologists. From both sides we are aware of each other's research, in the same way we are aware of crafts people and their advocators. However, we tend to discuss our work in isolation: archaeologists have their forums and anthropologists theirs. It is one of the primary aims of this workshop to bring together archaeologists, anthropologists and textile experts to better understand each other's approaches, uses, theoretical frameworks and the practical realities of craft. It will explore the use of traditional textile craft across time and space with the aim of exchanging knowledge and gaining insights into each other's agendas in order to have a better understanding of traditional textile craft and heritage frameworks.
We will, together with the participants, create an interactive, international and interdisciplinary network and platform for knowledge exchange which will allow approaches that are wide ranging and innovative. This will make the importance of textile crafts and textile histories more visible than hitherto with a clear recognition of the intertwined relationships between textiles, textile crafts, people and cultural heritage

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Wintle, Pamela

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
December 21, 2007
Project Title: 
Wintle, Dr. Pamela, Human Studies Film Archives, Suitland, MD - To aid final accession of the personal research materials of Dr. John Marshall -- Historical Archives Program Accession Supplement
Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Mencher, Joan P.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 16, 2010
Project Title: 
Mencher, Dr. Joan, New York, NY - To aid preparation of personal research materials for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Brown, Clayton D.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pittsburgh, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 31, 2006
Project Title: 
Brown, Clayton D., U. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA - To aid oral-history interviews with eight Chinese ethnologists and archaeologists on 'Defining the Self.'
Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$4,915

Nunziante Cesaro, Stella

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Sapienza U. of Rome
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 31, 2011
Project Title: 
Nunziante Cesaro, Dr. Stella, Sapienza U. of Rome, Italy - To aid workshop on 'An Integration of Use-Wear & Residues Analysis for Identification of Function of Archaeological Stone Tools,' 2012, Museum of Origins, Rome, with Dr. Cristina Lemorini

Preliminary Abstract: The workshop is intended to bring together archeological and scientific researchers and students involved in the study of use-wear traces on prehistoric stone tools and\or in the identification of micro residues that might be present in them in order to hypothesize their function. Use-wear analysis carried out with microscopic analysis at low or high magnification is now a settled procedure. At present, the individuation and identification of residues is done using a number of techniques which can roughly be divided into the invasive and non-invasive. Each employed technique obviously has advantages and limitations. Given that a standard analysis protocol does not now exist, the workshop will have the ambitious goal of evaluating where matters stand and laying the basis for developing an analysis protocol. Both traces and residues analysis require a comparison to useful replicas. Even with regard to the making of replicas, no protocol now exists. The workshop will have the ambitious goal of evaluating where matters stand and laying the basis for developing a protocol concerning both analysis procedures and replicas realization. The adoption of consistent methods will make it possible for data obtained by multiple researchers to become interchangeable.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Domanska, Lucyna

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
U. of Lodz
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 9, 2006
Project Title: 
Domanska, Dr. Lucyna, U. of Lodz, Lodz, Poland - To aid conference on 'Archaeological Invisibility and Forgotten Knowledge,' 2007, U. of Lodz, in collaboration with Dr. Ole Gron and Dr. Karen Hardy

'Archaeological Invisibility and Forgotten Knowledge'
September 5-9, 2007, University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
Organizers: Dr. Lucyna Domanska (University of Lodz), Dr. Ole Gron (Institute of Archaeology-London), and Dr. Karen Hardy (University of York)

This inter-congress of the World Archaeological Congress focused on cultural aspects of the prehistoric record that are not easily visible. Participants from across the world drew heavily on the use of ethnoarchaeology to illustrate important aspects of prehistory that are not always preserved in the archaeological record. A particular focus was on different aspects of hunter-gatherer behavior, including relationships with animals, the relationship between hunter-gatherers and their sedentary neighbors, burial practices, knowledge transfer, use of space, religion, economy, and use of items of material culture. The conference also highlighted the often forgotten but very extensive ethnographic literature from the early 20th century. The wide spectrum of ethnoarchaeological expertise from across the world created intense discussions and some fascinating insights into common themes that will be built on in future meetings.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Rost, Stephanie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Stony Brook, State U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 5, 2011
Project Title: 
Rost, Stephanie, Stony Brook U., Stony Brook, NY - To aid research on 'Irrigation and Political Centralization in the Ur III Period: The Case of the Province of Umma (Iraq),' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth C. Stone

STEPHANIE ROST, then a student at Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, received a grant in October 2011 to aid research on 'Irrigation and Political Centralization in the Ur III Period: The Case of the Province of Umma (South Iraq),' supervised by Dr. Elizabeth C. Stone. The field work undertaken at the Oriental Institute (University of Chicago) entailed the collection and analysis of the core data set of the dissertation project consisting of administrative records on the management of ancient irrigation systems. The dissertation examines the degree of state involvement in irrigation management in the Umma province of the Ur III state (2100-2004 BC). The study of the Sumerian Irrigation Terminology was instrumental in understanding Ur III irrigation management as it allowed for a clear distinction between irrigation and water management. Water management in southern Iraq consists of carefully balancing the great fluctuation between low and high water levels of the twin river Euphrates and Tigris. The preliminary results show that state's involvement was concentrated on water management by heavily financing water level control devices. While these devices were designed to provide irrigation water, their main function consisted of keeping water levels stable for prolonged river transportation and flood control. This finding is confirmed by the preliminary results on the degree of states involvement in managing irrigation systems. State sponsored work was concentrated on the key points (i.e. primary, secondary level and flow dividers) while the tertiary and field level seemed to have been managed locally.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$17,157

Goldin, Liliana R.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Florida International U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 9, 2009
Project Title: 
Goldin, Dr. Liliana, Florida International U., Miami, FL - To aid '70th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology,' 2010, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

'70th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology'
March 24-28, 2010, Merida, Mexico
Organizers: Liliana R. Goldin (Florida International University)

Support from Wenner-Gren was instrumental in funding two panels composed of eleven Latin American scholars from Guatemala and Argentina. The first panel, entitled 'Human Development, Poverty and Inequality in Guatemala,' was composed of members of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). The second panel, entitled 'Transnational
Transformations, Local Responses: Argentine Anthropology Facing Globalization,' was composed of anthropologists from CONICET (Argentinean Scientific Research Council) as well as the University of Misiones and SUNY Binghamton. Both panels highlighted the excellence in research conducted by Latin American colleagues and showcased the sophisticated ways in which anthropologists engage problem-solving in what according to some measures constitute the margins of the world economy. The conference theme invited the exploration of the effects of globalization on the peoples with whom applied social scientists work resulting in higher levels of exclusion of vulnerability. As a result of the need for increased collaboration in interdisciplinary and transnational teams, the conference encouraged the discussion on the innovative theories and methods employed to make sense out of such complicated and interrelated problems.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$14,000
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