Villanueva, Zandro V.

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2002
Project Title: 
Villanueva, Zandro V., U. of the Philippines, Quezon City, Phillipines - To aid training in archaeology at U. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, supervised by Dr. William Longacre
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

McEwan, Colin

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
September 5, 2014
Project Title: 
McEwan, Dr. Colin, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, DC - To aid workshop on 'The Art and Archaeology of Central America and Colombia,' 2015, STRI Panama City, Panama, in collaboration with Dr. James Doyle.

Preliminary abstract: The co-organizers seek funds from the Wenner-Gren Foundation for an international workshop on the art and archaeology of Central America and Colombia, to be held from Monday, January 26th to Thursday, January 29th, 2015 at the facilities of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama City, Panama. The objective of this workshop will be to build a definitive, integrated volume of synthetic chapters to complete our forthcoming catalogue, 'Central American and Colombian Art at Dumbarton Oaks.' We are bringing together a constellation of leading regional and international scholars to build upon our prior work on the objects in the Bliss collection at Dumbarton Oaks. The individual presentations and discussions will establish research connections and address unresolved issues in the archaeological and art historical scholarship of greater Central America and Colombia. Our goal, wherever possible, is to reconstruct, contextualize, and interpret original assemblages of material from Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia, both in international as well as local museum and archaeological collections. Underpinning the catalogue research is a renewed appreciation of how the indigenous peoples of Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia conceived of their environment, and how they represented the local flora and fauna in their visual and material culture.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$12,750

Batsukh, Jargal

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Mongolian Technical U.
Status: 
Lapsed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
July 31, 2001
Project Title: 
Batsukh, Jargal, Mongolian Technical University, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - To aid archaeological study at the University of Bradford, Bradford, UK, supervised by Dr. Carl Heron
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$12,500

National University of Mongolia

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
National U. of Mongolia
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at the National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - Institutional Development Grant

The main aim of the project is to radically upgrade the institutional capacity of the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, National University of Mongolia, in order to make the department an institution that offers internationally sound anthropological research and training in Mongolia, and thus establish the field of socio-cultural anthropology in Mongolia firmly. The specific objectives of the project are to (1) develop a sound doctoral program that meets international standards, (2) train 4 new doctorates jointly with the Mongolian and Inner Asian Studies Unit (MIASU) and the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge, and recruit these doctorates as faculty members in the Department, (3) build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance technical capacity of the department.

Mongolian and Cambridge professors will set up a joint committee and design and develop a doctoral program. Four Mongolian and four Cambridge professors will take part in designing and developming of doctoral program and courses. They will mainly work through internet, however, Mongolian professors will visit the Cambridge University. Four Mongolian professors will work at MIASU in total of 7 months while developing ten doctoral courses.

In order to radically enhance the department's research and teaching capacity the Department will select four doctoral candidates for a temporary joint Ph.D. program. The selected doctoral candidates will study and conduct their research under Mongolian and Cambridge professors' joint supervision. Each doctoral candidate will spend a total of two full terms (5 months) of training at Cambridge University. Doctoral candidates are expected to submit their dissertation in English and defend their dissertations in front of the joint committee. Upon their successful completion of their degree, they will be recruited to the department as faculty members.

In addition, to support its research and teaching the department will build an up-to-date resource collection on socio-cultural anthropology and enhance its technical capacity.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$125,000

Danda, Ajit Kumar

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Indian Anthropological Society
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 1, 2010
Project Title: 
Danda, Dr. Ajith, Indian Anthropological Society, Kolkata, India - To aid Golden Jubilee conference of IAS on 'Locating Alternative Voices of Anthropology,' 2011, Kolkata, in collaboration with Dr. Rajat Kanti Das

Preliminary abstract: The International Symposium proposed to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of the Indian Anthropological Society will have the following dual objectives :1) To eveluate the contributions of anthropologists : Euro-American, Afro-Asian, and Latin American in the light of dualism : Western vs. non-Western, that pervades the field of anthropology. 2) To evaluate the contributions of intellectuals, social thinkers, and literary figures toward anthropology in the Indian contexts. The Western view of anthropology, as a political and colonial discourse, has been countered by anthropologists from Asia, Africa, and Latin America in a way that may be understood as being based upon a rhetoric of equality reflected in the establishment of self-identity. It has discovered a voice to defend the rights of indigenes, tribes, and ethnic groups who were so long considered as products of a process of exclusion (Lindquist : 1966, Hulme : 1986,Todavor : 1987, Said : 1978, Mason : 1990, Thomas 1991, Danda : 1995, de-Certeau :1997). Though the American and European imagery of 'otherness' has been questened time and again, the Western discourses and practices are still regarded as guidelines for others to follow. Isn't it possible to look at anything but a product of the Western discourses and practices? This is the major issue to be debated in the proposed symposium.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Price, David H.

Grant Type: 
Historical Archives Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 24, 2009
Project Title: 
Price, Dr. David H., St. Martin's U., Lacey, WA - To aid preparation of the personal research materials of Dr. Marvin Harris for archival deposit with the National Anthropological Archives, Suitland, MD - Historical Archives Program
Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Gero, Joan Margaret

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
American U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 15, 2002
Project Title: 
Gero, Dr. Joan, American U., Washington, DC - To aid fifth World Archaeological Congress, 2003, American U.

'The Fifth World Archaeological Congress (WAC-5),' June 21-26, 2003, Washington, DC -- Organizer: Dr. Joan Gero (American University). The World Archaeological Congress (WAC) was founded in 1985 as the only representative, fully international organization of practicing archaeologists. Since then, WAC has held an international congress every four years to discuss new archaeological research as well as archaeological policy, practice, and politics. After meeting in Britain, Venezuela, India and South Africa, the fifth World Archaeological Congress (WAC-5) was held in Washington, D.C. from June 21 - 26th, 2003. More than 1100 people attended, representing 77 different countries and tribal nations. The four-day program was convened in 23 concurrently running sessions that totaled some 1400 presentations (since some people offered more than one presentation). Topics under discussion varied widely, from regional sessions dedicated to presentations of new research within a specific geographic region, to reflective theoretical discussions about such ideas as how decision making in fieldwork affects what we know about the past. Underwater archaeology, the management of public archaeological sites, use of remote sensing techniques, ancient systems of astronomy, and women's roles in hide preparation were all large and popular topics. At the same time, many native, indigenous, and tribal people attended in order to bring their minority voices to the discussion. Approximately 350 of the participants received some financial support towards their attendance, all of them from low-income countries or Native/aboriginal settlements. Of these, 27 were supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research. In addition, Wenner-Gren provided an important workshop for international participants on the topic of securing research funds from North American sources.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Smith, Claire Edwina

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Adelaide, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Smith, Dr. Claire Edwina, Flinders U., Adelaide, Australia - To aid Sixth World Archaeological Congress (WAC-6), 2008, U. College Dublin, in collaboration with Dr. Larry Zimmerman

'Sixth World Archaeological Congress (WAC-6)'
June 29-July 4, 2008, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Organizers: Claire E. Smith (Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia) and Larry Zimmerman (Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, Indiana)

The World Archaeological Congress is the only fully international and representative organization of practicing archaeologists. WAC's mission is to: 1) promote professional training for disadvantaged nations and communities; 2) broaden public education, involving national and international communities in archaeological research; 3) develop archaeological practice so that it empowers Indigenous and minority; 4) contribute to the conservation of archaeological sites threatened by looting, urban growth, tourism, development or war; and 5) re-dress globality inequities among archaeologists. WAC Congresses are held every 4 years. WAC-6 was the first WAC Congress in Ireland. Previous Congresses have taken place in Washington, DC (2003), South Africa (1999), India (1994), Venezuela (1990) and England (1986). Support from Wenner-Gren was used to provide partial assistance to 19 participants from traditionally underrepresented areas and groups, who had the opportunity to bring their local perspectives to an international forum and to actively influence future directions of WAC and WAC policies.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Scie

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Other
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 19, 2010
Project Title: 
Intl. Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences, Manchester, UK (through IUAES org. John Gledhill) - To aid '17th Congress of the IUAES: Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds,' 2013, Manchester

'Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds: The 17th Congress of the International Union of Anthropological & Ethnological Sciences'
August 5-10, 2013, Manchester University, Manchester, United Kingdom
Organizer: Dr. John Gledhill (Manchester U.)

This truly global congress brought together 1260 anthropologists from sixty-five countries to present 1283 papers in 211 parallel session panels, which successfully promoted dialogue between scholars from different countries and across sub-field boundaries. This networking will be consolidated in the future through the system of IUAES commissions that was reinvigorated at the event. The use of thematic tracks for the parallel sessions worked well in producing innovative and focused panels, the Museum Anthropology track involved international conversations that included countries such as China, and the Visual Anthropology program included several imaginative complements to the normal film-screenings and panel presentations. Wenner-Gren's central role in the promotion of world anthropology and the IUAES was entertainingly presented in Leslie Aiello's inaugural keynote address. Lourdes Arizpe and Howard Morphy gave additional keynotes sponsored by ASA and RAI respectively. Three plenaries consisted of debates between four key speakers, with additional audience participation, another well-received innovation that sharpened the presentation of issues and ensured global diversity amongst the plenary speakers. The final plenary was a panel discussion on World Anthropologies. This and two other panels were sponsored by WCAA. Edited videos of the plenary sessions are now available on YouTube, and various print publications are also in preparation.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Universidad Nacional de Cordoba

Grant Type: 
Inst. Development Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cordoba, National U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
June 24, 2008
Project Title: 
To support the development of a doctoral program in anthropology at Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina - Institutional Development Grant

The Museum of Anthropology of Córdoba, Argentina, supported by the IDG of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, will develop a doctoral program to prepare professionals for research and academic education in Anthropological Sciences, with specialized training in the three classic sub-areas of research: Social Anthropology, Archaeology and Bioanthropology. The Museum will also benefit from collaborations with the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology of the University of Kansas, the Department of Anthropology of the University of Wyoming and Postgraduate Program in Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil the Museum.

The Doctoral program will focus on intensive theoretical and practical training to produce professionals who will be able to undertake independent research projects, exercise leadership of scientific research teams, communicate their research results, and teach at the university. It is hoped that through this program the students will also acquire various experiences in diverse academic contexts and form external relationship which will open possibilities for exchange and dialogue with other anthropologists, while generating their own future networks. It is hoped that this would impact positively on their education and in their personal and institutional performance.

The existence of a Postgraduate Program in Anthropological Sciences at Córdoba opens up the possibility of continuity in the training of graduate students and their integration into the teaching and research activities. This in turn will provide more opportunities for graduates of other neighboring Argentina provinces, where there is no such possibility of postgraduate training. This also will extend the possibilities of bringing the practice of anthropology to non academic realms, responding to a continuous growing demand in the region.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$125,000