Solangaarachchi, Rose A.

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Florida, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
July 1, 2002
Project Title: 
Solangaarachchi, Rose A., Post Graduate Institute of Archaeology, U. of Kelaniya, Colombo, Sri Lanka - To aid training in archaeology at the U. of Florida, Gainesville, FL, supervised by Dr. Peter Schmidt
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Lilley, Ian A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Queensland, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 1, 2013
Project Title: 
Lilley, Dr. Ian A., U. of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia - To aid '20th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association,' 2014, Siem Reap/Angkor Wat, Cambodia, in collaboration with Mr. Kaseka Phon

'20th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association'
January 12-18, 2014, Siem Reap, Cambodia
Organizers: Ian A. Lilley (U. Queensland) and Kaseka Phon (Royal Academy of Cambodia)

The 20th Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association (IPPA) Congress was co-organized with the Royal Academy of Cambodia in Siem Reap, Cambodia, adjacent to the magnificent World Heritage site of Angkor. The Congress brought together 750 participants from 40 countries around the world. There were delegates from every country in North, South, and Southeast Asia (except North Korea and Brunei), including 32 Cambodian speakers as well as the participation of more than 100 other Cambodian attendees, many of whom were students gaining invaluable exposure to the international scene. The Cambodians were supported by government funding, while a Wenner-Gren grant supported some 100 eligible scholars and students drawn from other developing countries in the IPPA region of interest, including the first-ever IPPA delegate from Myanmar (Burma). The program saw some 580 papers delivered over the course of 64 sessions, making it the largest IPPA Congress to date. The papers covered Indo-Pacific historical anthropology in the broadest sense, including archaeology, cultural heritage, the natural sciences, comparative linguistics, cultural anthropology and biological anthropology and genetics. Sessions covered the entire IPPA region of interest as well as the Americas on a comparative basis and East Africa and Madagascar in relation to the prehistoric movement of Southeast Asian people to those regions.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Baker, Brenda Jane

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Arizona State U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 31, 2011
Project Title: 
Baker, Dr. Brenda, Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ - To aid workshop on 'Disruptions as a Cause and Consequence of Migration in Human History,' 2012, Saguaro Lake Ranch, Mesa, AZ, in collaboration with Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda

'Disruptions as a Cause and Consequence of Migration in Human History'
May 3-5, 2011, Saguaro Lake Ranch, Mesa, Arizona
Organizers: Dr. Brenda Baker & Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda (Arizona State U.)

Migration has been integral to the development of human societies since the emergence of our species and has continuously reshaped the economic, ethnic, and political dynamics of various societies over time, yet little dialogue has occurred between scholars examining contemporary and past migrations. This workshop was intended to stimulate an intellectual exchange among sociocultural anthropologists, archaeologists, bioarchaeologists, and others who study migration to analyze the extent to which environmental and social disruptions have been a cause of migration over time and whether these migratory flows have in turn led to disruptive consequences for the societies that receive them. Another goal was to help develop an understanding of common processes operating in past and present migrations. An initial conceptual framework developed by a collaborative group of faculty from Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change was circulated to workshop participants to help guide articulation with common themes and stimulate discussion. Presentations and lively discussions were geared toward developing our understanding of the relationship between disruptions and population displacements from prehistory to the present. This workshop has resulted in the submission of revised papers for publication in an edited volume.

Publication credit:

Baker, Brenda J., and Takeyuki Tsuda (eds.) 2015. Migration & Disruptions: Toward a Unifying Theory of Ancient and Contemporary Migrations. University of Florida Press: Gainesville.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Parkington, John E.

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cape Town, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
April 18, 2002
Project Title: 
University of Cape Town Fund, Inc., New York, NY- To aid Wenner-Gren Fellowship at the U. of Cape Town, South Africa, to support the training of black southern Africans in archaeology, supervised by Dr. John Parkington
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$7,100

McGovern, Thomas H.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
New York, Hunter College, City U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
McGovern, Dr. Thomas Howatt, City U. of New York, New York, NY - To aid workshop on 'Social Responses to Climate Change: Southwest and North Atlantic Long-Term Human Ecodynamics,' 2012, San Diego, CA, in collaboration with Dr. Katherine Ann Spielmann

'Social Responses to Climate Change: Southwest and North Atlantic Long-Term Human Ecodynamics'
Sept. 20-23, 2012, San Diego, CA
July 7-10, 2013, Thelamork School, Akureyri, Iceland
Organizers: Thomas H. McGovern (City U. New York) and Catherine Spielmann (Arizona State U.)

Two workshops were funded by this grant, whose overall objective was to make use of perspectives developed by the resilience community, the environmental hazards communities, human securities communities, and historical ecology to mobilize the data sets and case studies developed in two strongly contrastive world areas to try to better deploy 'the completed long term human ecodynamics experiments of the past' for current attempts to design sustainable futures. The workshops were intense and highly successful in employing fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) in coding a common set of variables and in finding effective comparisons of climate impact in the two regions. The teams collaborated closely in defining and scoring outcomes of three classes of transformation of Social Ecological Systems: transformative relocation, continuity with change, and collapse. Common patterns were found in Norse and Southwest cases linking pre-climate change conditions with outcomes in unanticipated ways, and the adverse impact on human security of apparently sustainable continuity with change was often considerable. Multiple publications are in preparation.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$19,990

Castro Lucic, Milka

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Chile, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 4, 2002
Project Title: 
Castro Lucic, Dr. Milka, U. of Chile, Santiago, Chile - To aid 51st Congress of International Americanists, 2003, U. of Chile, in collaboration with Dr. Jorge Hildalgo Lehuende
Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Villeneuve, Suzanne Natascha

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Victoria, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 18, 2008
Project Title: 
Villeneuve, Suzanne N., U. of Victoria, BC, Canada - To aid workshop on 'Archaeological and Anthropological Perspectives on Ritual Spaces and Sacred Places,' 2012, Simon Fraser U., Burnaby, BC, in collaboration with Dr. Brian D. Hayden

Preliminary Abstract: The research encompassed by this workshop is fundamental to understanding the role of ritual activities in the emergence of socioeconomic inequalities and political complexity in village-level (transegalitarian) ethnographic and prehistoric societies. This workshop will first document the range of ethnographic village-level ritual activities and then develop models to understand the role of ritual in community dynamics. Although ritual activity in transegalitarian societies has been implicated in the creation of socioeconomic inequalities and political power, theoretical models of the kinds of rituals, the motivations for creating them, and the means by which they promote inequalities are poorly developed for transegalitarian societies (with a few notable exceptions such as ancestor worship). There is no general synthesis of ritual activity at this level of organization. Moreover, for archaeologists, there is as yet little ethnographic or archaeological information on how such activities can be identified at transegalitarian levels. Thus, in this workshop, we will focus on what purposes rituals serve in relation to social, political, and economic dynamics of transegalitarian communities, and how these aspects can be identified archaeologically.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$14,628

Motloung, Alitta N.

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Witwatersrand, U. of
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
March 21, 2006
Project Title: 
Motloung, Alitta, U. of Witwatersrand, Wits, South Africa -- to aid training in archaeology at U. Wits, supervised by Dr. Karim Sadr
Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$2,663

Enfield, Nicholas James

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Max Planck Institute
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
September 6, 2007
Project Title: 
Enfield, Dr. Nicholas James, Max Planck Institute, Nijmegen, The Netherlands - To aid workshop on 'Dynamics of Human Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia,' 2009, Siem Reap, Cambodia, in collaboration with Dr. Joyce Carol White

'Dynamics of Human Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia'
January 7-10, 2009, Siem Reap, Cambodia
Organizers: Nicholas Enfield (Max Planck Instittute, Nijmegen) and Joyce White (University of Pennsylvania Museum)

This four-field meeting brought together an international group of linguists, social/cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, and physical/biological anthropologists, to address the following question: What is the nature of human diversity in mainland Southeast Asia, and how did it come to be this way? The focus of discussions was restricted spatially to
mainland Southeast Asia (centrally, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and the Malay Peninsula) and temporally to the Holocene (the last 11,000 years). Drawing upon exciting new developments in all sub-fields of anthropology in this area, scholars from different disciplines came together to update one another on the states of their respective arts, as well
as to identify new syntheses and new agendas for interdisciplinary research. Issues of homeland of ethnolinguistic groups, and of timing of migrations (especially of the Asian groups of peninsular Malaysia and Thailand, and more generally the Austroasiatic language family), were illuminated by considering different kinds of evidence from the most recent
research in historical linguistics, archaeology, and especially the latest results from bioarchaeology and genetics. None of the biggest questions were definitively solved, but the meeting succeeded in bringing all participants further along in the search for solutions, as well as forging some new scholarly relationships with the potential for future interdisciplinary collaborations.

Publication credit:

Enfield, N.J. 2011. Linguistic Diversity in Mainland Southeast Asia. In Dynamics of Human Diversity: The Case of Mainland Southeast Asia. Pacific Linguistics. School of Culture, History and Language. College of Asia and the Pacific. The Australian National University: Canberra.

Grant Year: 
2007
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Paberzyte, Ieva

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
McGill U.
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
September 13, 2004
Project Title: 
Paberzyte, Ieva, Vilnius U., Vilnius, Lithuania - To aid training in archaeology at McGill U., Montreal, Canada, supervised by Dr. Andre Costopoulos
Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$15,000