Bauer, Radhika L.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pennsylvania, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 5, 2004
Project Title: 
Bauer, Radhika L., U. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA - To aid research on 'Animals in Social Life during the South Indian Early Historic Period,' supervised by Dr. Gregory L. Possehl

RADHIKA L. BAUER, then a student at University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was awarded a grant in November 2004 to aid research on 'Animals in Social Life during the South Indian Early Historic Period,' supervised by Dr. Gregory L. Possehl. Funding aided completion of doctoral fieldwork research at the Iron Age (c. 1000 - 300 BC) site of Kadebakale, Karnataka, India during the period of December 10, 2004 through May 30, 2005. This research was aimed to address two research questions: 1) what animal-based subsistence strategies were Iron Age inhabitants participating in?; and 2) are there differences in consumption patterns throughout the site that relate to various social practices? Towards this end, analysis of archaeological faunal remains took place in the field laboratory took place over a period of 12 weeks. This work sought to identify and describe the Kadebakale faunal assemblage by counting, weighing, measuring, and recording attributes such as exposure to heat and the presence (or absence) of modifications or pathologies. Species identifications were secured over a period of four weeks spent using the comparative collection housed at Deccan College (Maharashtra) in order to determine the most precise level of identity that could be attributed to a bone. In addition, reference to a photographic and morphometric database of South Indian fauna curated in US museums (created by the author in 2004) were used to identify species that were not represented in the Deccan College material. Approximately eight weeks were spent interviewing and observing pastoralists and fisherfolk in the Tungabhadra region to understand local ecology and animal husbandry. This research provided regionally-specific information about herd management, hunting of wild animals, and the ecology of endemic taxa.

Grant Year: 
2004
Award Amount: 
$13,300

Evans, Damian Harold

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Sydney, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 4, 2011
Project Title: 
Evans, Dr. Damian Harold, U. of Sydney, Sydney, Australia - To aid research and writing on 'Redefining Angkor: The Landscape Archaeology of Southeast Asia's Great 'Hydraulic City'' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary Abstract: This project involves the development and publication of a monograph tentatively titled 'Redefining Angkor: The landscape archaeology of Southeast Asia's great 'Hydraulic City''. For the past decade the author has been responsible for archaeological mapping at the medieval city of Angkor, in Cambodia, using field surveys and the analysis of a diverse range of remote sensing datasets. The work has revealed the existence of an extended settlement complex stretching far beyond the main temples, as well as a vast and intricate water management system. The emergence of a comprehensive picture of settlement structure at Angkor creates the opportunity to rigorously evaluate competing theories of Angkor's subsistence, growth and decline for the first time. The implications of the new data for the 'hydraulic city' hypothesis, in which the collapse of the water control system is held to be a cause of Angkor's decline, are covered in detail. Alternative interpretations are considered, and the mapping activities are located within the overall history of archaeological mapping and remote sensing at Angkor. The work will develop new perspectives on the nature of early urban centres in Southeast Asia, which have traditionally been considered to be neatly defined spaces that developed from the circular moated sites of prehistory to the walled cities of the medieval era. In fact, the morphology of the dispersed, low-density urban complexes of that period, of which Angkor is the largest, suggest a clear affinity with the modern conurbations of the late twentieth century in which a peri-urban fringe extends far beyond the well-defined urban core.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Lewis, Helen Anne

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
U. College Dublin
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
Lewis, Dr. Helen, U. College Dublin, Dublin, UK - To aid '14th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists (EurASEAA),' 2012, U. College Dublin

'European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists 14th Int'l Conference (EURASEAA14)'
September 18-21, 2013, Dublin, Ireland
Organizer: Dr. Helen Lewis (U. College Dublin)

EurASEAA14 was organized by University College Dublin School of Archaeology, bringing together over 200 archaeologists, art historians, and philologists studying Southeast Asia's past. Panels on topics of interest to Southeast Asian regional archaeology (including archaeobotany, human bioarchaeology, epigraphy, and mansucripts) were organized around the theme of 'Science, Archaeology and Heritage in Southeast Asia.' Special focus was given to Southeast Asian ceramics, building on momentum from an international workshop hosted by the University of Pennsylvania Museum and the Smithsonian Institution in 2010, as well as to Khmer archaeology, with additional subregional panels related to important 'peripheries,' 'crossroads' or 'boundaries' - Taiwan, Myanmar and Northeast India. Funding from Wenner-Gren supported twenty-one Southeast and South Asian scholars to attend and present conference papers.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Rouse, Lynne Marie

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Washington U., St. Louis
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 4, 2010
Project Title: 
Rouse, Lynne Marie, Washington U., St. Louis, MO - To aid 'The Ancient Murghab Archaeology Project: Perspectives on Bronze Age Interaction in Southern Turkmenistan,' supervised by Dr. Michael Frachetti

LYNNE MARIE ROUSE, then a student at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, was awarded a grant in May 2010, to aid 'The Ancient Murghab Archaeology Project: Perspectives on Bronze Age Interaction in Southern Turkmenistan,' supervised by Dr. Michael Frachetti . Excavations and subsequent analyses of material from Site 1744 in the Murghab Delta of Turkmenistan provide the first direct evidence of the mobility and economic strategies of non-urban settlement there during the Bronze Age. Data suggests the inhabitants of these small sites were independent mobile pastoralists, moving regularly through the delta and subsisting primarily on animal products obtained from their herds. These were not isolated populations, however, and they seem to have had a direct, sustainable relationship with the urban agricultural communities also living in the delta at this time. Archaeo-botanical data shows mobile pastoralists clearly utilized agricultural fields post-harvest to graze their flocks, bringing them into close physical and probably socio-economic contact with urban populations. Excavation of a ceramic kiln reveals mobile pastoral groups possessed the technology necessary to produce the high-quality ceramics traditionally associated only with urban production, and possibly the imitation of urban ceramic forms. The archaeological evidence from Site 1744 affirms the presence of a distinct but not unrelated population alongside the more visible remains of Bronze Age urban populations, and is likely representative of a largely peaceful, productive, and mutually beneficial relationship between mobile pastoralists and sedentary farmers in Bronze Age southern Turkmenistan.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Bellwood, Peter S.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
February 23, 2009
Project Title: 
Bellwood, Dr. Peter Stafford, Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid '19th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association,' 2009, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences, Hanoi, in collaboration with Dr. Giang Hai Nguyen

'The 19th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association'
November 29-December 5, 2009, Vietnam Institute of Archaeology, Hanoi, Vietnam
Organizers: Peter Bellwood (Australian National University) and Giang Hai Nguyen (Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences)

A total of 650 people attended the conference, representing about 30 countries in the Indo- Pacific region, as well as Europe and North America. Forty-nine individual sessions were held concurrently in five seminar rooms, with over 400 papers were presented. The conference attracted many younger students from Indo-Pacific countries who were able to meet and discuss their research with peers from countries outside the region. A full program and other details can be found at http://arts.anu.edu.au/arcworld/ippa/19thcongress.htm. The sessions were grouped into four major themes: 1) Pleistocene culture and evolution; 2) the archaeological record during the Holocene (geographical or chronological foci); 3) thematic or disciplinary (comparative, social, biological, environmental) foci; and 4) themes related to heritage management, education, and the development of archaeology as a discipline. Convenors have been asked to collect papers for editing, refereeing and publication in the Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$10,000

Fiskesjo, N. Magnus G.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cornell U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 17, 2011
Project Title: 
Fiskesjo, Dr. N. Magnus G., Cornell U., Ithaca, NY - To aid workshop on 'Rice and Language across Asia: Crops, Movement, and Social Change,' 2011, Cornell U., in collaboration with Dr. John B. Whitman

Preliminary abstract: The goal of this workshop is to examine the beginnings and spread of rice agriculture in early Asia, in light of the rapidly growing advances in human genetics on human migrations; linguistic studies of language diversification; plant genetics; and archaeological research on agricultural beginnings in the region. The workshop will focus on the complex relationship between crops, language and sociocultural developments in early South, Southeast, and East Asia, which have not previously been discussed together on this scale. We pay special attention to the role of rice, as a highly significant, dominant crop in early agricultural transformations and expansions across Asia, and to how human populations were impacted and societies changed as a result of the introduction and development of rice farming. Collaborative work by the workshop organizers reveals significant crossdisciplinary differences in the understanding of such notions as 'diffusion' and 'population,' and the critical resources of anthropology will play a central role in mediating these differences and establishing a common ground for future research. The workshop will debate and aim to establish conceptual foundations for interdisciplinary communications and comparative discussion between the different scholarly fields involved -- anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and genetics

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Lewis, Laura Victoria

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 17, 2013
Project Title: 
Lewis, Laura Victoria, U. of Oxford, Oxford, UK - To aid research on 'Small Tools, Big Questions: A Comparison of the Earliest Microlithic Technologies in Two Sub-Continents,' supervised by Dr. Michael Petraglia

Preliminary abstract: Microlith production is a highly distinctive and significant stone tool technology. Systematic production of microliths began in different regions at different times, and in different social and environmental settings. However, microlithic industries have tended to be treated as a monolithic entity, without taking into account the variety of different methods of production and use. Variation within and between assemblages can reveal much about the various reasons why particular microlithic forms were selected as beneficial technological adaptations in particular regions, and the manufacturing choices that people made in order to produce their desired tools. This research will be the first to directly and quantitatively examine changes in microlithic technology over both space and time in two of the earliest microlithic industries in the world -- the Howiesons Poort of southern Africa and the Late Palaeolithic of South Asia.

Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$2,250

Schepartz, Lynne A.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cincinnati, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
January 30, 2001
Project Title: 
Schepartz, Dr. Lynne A., U. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH - To aid conference on Asia and the Middle Pleistocene in global perspective, 2001, East-West Center, Manoa, Hawaii, in collaboration with Dr. Sari Miller-Antonio
Grant Year: 
2001
Award Amount: 
$9,000

Bellwood, Peter S.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 28, 2002
Project Title: 
Bellwood, Dr. Peter S., Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid 17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, 2002, Academia Sinica Campus, Nankang, Taipei, in collaboration with Dr. Cheng-hwa Tsang

'17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association,' September 9-15, 2002 , Academia Sinica in Taipei, Taiwan -- Organizers: Dr. Peter Bellwood, Australian National University, and Dr. Tsang Cheng-Hwa, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica. 276 papers were given in a total of 30 sessions, with themes ranging from the earliest human settlement of Asia, through early farmers and civilizations, to issues related to the preservation of cultural and archaeological heritage at the present day. The delegates represented 30 countries spread through Europe (including Russia), South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, Australasia and North America. Funding was used to support the attendance of 30 delegates from Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Russia, Sri Lanka and Thailand, out of a total of 80 funded delegates from developing countries. The publications from the conference will appear over the next few years in several issues of the Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Associat

Publication Credit:

Bellwood, Peter, Ben Marwick, and Richard Pearson (eds.) 2007. Proceedings of the 17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association. Taipei, Taiwan: 9 to 15 September 2002.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Flad, Rowan K.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant