Bellwood, Peter S.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Australian National U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 28, 2002
Project Title: 
Bellwood, Dr. Peter S., Australian National U., Canberra, Australia - To aid 17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, 2002, Academia Sinica Campus, Nankang, Taipei, in collaboration with Dr. Cheng-hwa Tsang

'17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association,' September 9-15, 2002 , Academia Sinica in Taipei, Taiwan -- Organizers: Dr. Peter Bellwood, Australian National University, and Dr. Tsang Cheng-Hwa, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica. 276 papers were given in a total of 30 sessions, with themes ranging from the earliest human settlement of Asia, through early farmers and civilizations, to issues related to the preservation of cultural and archaeological heritage at the present day. The delegates represented 30 countries spread through Europe (including Russia), South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, Australasia and North America. Funding was used to support the attendance of 30 delegates from Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Russia, Sri Lanka and Thailand, out of a total of 80 funded delegates from developing countries. The publications from the conference will appear over the next few years in several issues of the Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Associat

Publication Credit:

Bellwood, Peter, Ben Marwick, and Richard Pearson (eds.) 2007. Proceedings of the 17th Congress of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association. Taipei, Taiwan: 9 to 15 September 2002.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Evans, Damian Harold

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Sydney, U. of
Status: 
Lapsed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 4, 2011
Project Title: 
Evans, Dr. Damian Harold, U. of Sydney, Sydney, Australia - To aid research and writing on 'Redefining Angkor: The Landscape Archaeology of Southeast Asia's Great 'Hydraulic City'' - Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship

Preliminary Abstract: This project involves the development and publication of a monograph tentatively titled 'Redefining Angkor: The landscape archaeology of Southeast Asia's great 'Hydraulic City''. For the past decade the author has been responsible for archaeological mapping at the medieval city of Angkor, in Cambodia, using field surveys and the analysis of a diverse range of remote sensing datasets. The work has revealed the existence of an extended settlement complex stretching far beyond the main temples, as well as a vast and intricate water management system. The emergence of a comprehensive picture of settlement structure at Angkor creates the opportunity to rigorously evaluate competing theories of Angkor's subsistence, growth and decline for the first time. The implications of the new data for the 'hydraulic city' hypothesis, in which the collapse of the water control system is held to be a cause of Angkor's decline, are covered in detail. Alternative interpretations are considered, and the mapping activities are located within the overall history of archaeological mapping and remote sensing at Angkor. The work will develop new perspectives on the nature of early urban centres in Southeast Asia, which have traditionally been considered to be neatly defined spaces that developed from the circular moated sites of prehistory to the walled cities of the medieval era. In fact, the morphology of the dispersed, low-density urban complexes of that period, of which Angkor is the largest, suggest a clear affinity with the modern conurbations of the late twentieth century in which a peri-urban fringe extends far beyond the well-defined urban core.

Publication credit:

Evans, Damian, and Roland Fletcher. 2015. The Landscape of Angkor Wat Redefined. Antiquity 89(348):1402-1419.

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$40,000

Law, Randall W.

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Wisconsin, Madison, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 21, 2014
Project Title: 
Law, Dr. Randall William, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI - To aid research on 'Identifying Indus Civilization Copper Sources and Exchange Networks Using Lead Isotope Analysis'

DR. RANDALL W. LAW, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, was awarded funding in April 2014 to aid research on 'Identifying Indus Civilization Copper Sources and Exchange Networks Using Lead Isotope Analysis.' With Wenner-Gren support, a large and diverse set of copper artifacts excavated from sites belonging to the Indus Civilization of ancient (ca. 2600-1900 BC) South Asia were analyzed using lead isotope analysis and compared to copper ore sources across the Indian subcontinent and beyond. Funds also supported the sampling and analysis of important but poorly characterized copper deposits in Rajasthan, India. The result was the creation of an extensive database of copper artifacts and sources that can now be used to examine longstanding questions relating to raw material acquisition patterns, internal and external exchange networks, and inter-cultural contacts during the Bronze Age of South Asia. It has already been possible to confirm that Indus peoples obtained their copper from multiple sources in Rajasthan, the Balochistan region of Pakistan, and even as far distant as eastern Arabia. The Ambaji-Sendra copper belt along the Gujarat-Rajasthan border region of western India has now been identified as one of the earliest source areas exploited and as an important zone of connect between Indus peoples and those of the Ahar-Banas culture complex in southern Rajasthan. These and other findings are necessitating a reevaluation of the larger dynamics of Indus Civilization interregional interaction networks.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$20,000

Pryce, Thomas Oliver

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 5, 2015
Project Title: 
Pryce, Dr. Thomas, CNRS, Nanterre, France - To aid '15th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists (EurASEAA),' 2015, U. de Paris Ouest, Nanterre, in collaboration with Dr. Berenice Bellina

Preliminary abstract: The European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists (EurASEAA) was established in 1986 as a parallel association of the already existing South Asian Archaeology Association. The main aim of the association is to bring together every two years, at a European venue, scholars who are working in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, including prehistory and early history, ethnoarchaeology, art history, epigraphy and philology, to present and discuss new data. This international initiative aims to foster scholarly cooperation within Europe, as well as world-wide cooperation between Southeast Asian scholars. The Association is striving to find funds to facilitate the participation of Southeast Asian colleagues. EurASEAA held its first conference in London and has since moved around various European cities: Berlin (1998, 2010), Bougon (2006), Brussels (1990), Dublin (2012), Leiden (1996, 2008), London (1986, 2004), Paris (1988, 1994), Rome (1992), Sarteano (2000), and Sigtuna (2002). EurASEAA 15 will run for five days from Monday 6th July to Friday 10th July, 2015. We invite panels on any topic or theme related to Southeast Asian archaeology. Papers on South Asia and China which are important for issues of long-distant contact and regional modelling will be considered if they relate closely to Southeast Asian themes.

Grant Year: 
2015
Award Amount: 
$12,440

Bridges, Elizabeth Jane

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 30, 2008
Project Title: 
Bridges, Elizabeth Jane, U. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI - To aid research on 'Regional Political Authority Under the Vijayanagara Empire: Archaeology of the Keladi-Ikkeri Nayakas,' supervised by Dr. Carla M. Sinopoli

ELIZABETH BRIDGES, then a student at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, received a grant in April 2008, to aid research on 'Regional Political Authority Under the Vijayanagara Empire: Archaeology of the Keladi-Ikkeri Nayakas,' supervised by Dr. Carla M. Sinopoli. This project investigated the Keladi-Ikkeri Nayakas, regional kings who ruled under the Vijayanagara Empire from 1500 to 1614 and as independent sovereigns from 1614 to 1763. This project is based on archaeological survey at the first and second capitals of the Nayaka kings, occupied in the imperial and early independent periods. Archaeological fieldwork was conducted during three seasons between 2007 and 2009; Wenner-Gren funding supported the completion of fieldwork in the final season and subsequent analysis of artifacts. Archaeological fieldwork was conducted at the sites of Keladi and Ikkeri in Shimoga District, Karnataka State, India. A full-coverage survey over 18 square kilometers comprising the former urban cores at both sites located and documented a total of 238 sites. Support also funded archival research on historical sources held in the British Library; the documents examined included unpublished translations of relevant literature, and early colonial survey and census data relevant to establishing site chronology. These and other lines of evidence indicate that while the empire was instrumental in supporting the development of Nayaka power, regional rulers were functionally highly autonomous. This picture represents a contrast to many other archaeologically known empires whose processes of regional integration relied on relations of domination and resistance.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$17,396

Fiskesjo, N. Magnus G.

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Cornell U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 17, 2011
Project Title: 
Fiskesjo, Dr. N. Magnus G., Cornell U., Ithaca, NY - To aid workshop on 'Rice and Language across Asia: Crops, Movement, and Social Change,' 2011, Cornell U., in collaboration with Dr. John B. Whitman

Preliminary abstract: The goal of this workshop is to examine the beginnings and spread of rice agriculture in early Asia, in light of the rapidly growing advances in human genetics on human migrations; linguistic studies of language diversification; plant genetics; and archaeological research on agricultural beginnings in the region. The workshop will focus on the complex relationship between crops, language and sociocultural developments in early South, Southeast, and East Asia, which have not previously been discussed together on this scale. We pay special attention to the role of rice, as a highly significant, dominant crop in early agricultural transformations and expansions across Asia, and to how human populations were impacted and societies changed as a result of the introduction and development of rice farming. Collaborative work by the workshop organizers reveals significant crossdisciplinary differences in the understanding of such notions as 'diffusion' and 'population,' and the critical resources of anthropology will play a central role in mediating these differences and establishing a common ground for future research. The workshop will debate and aim to establish conceptual foundations for interdisciplinary communications and comparative discussion between the different scholarly fields involved -- anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and genetics

Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$7,500

Lewis, Helen Anne

Grant Type: 
Conference & Workshop Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
U. College Dublin
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
March 6, 2012
Project Title: 
Lewis, Dr. Helen, U. College Dublin, Dublin, UK - To aid '14th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists (EurASEAA),' 2012, U. College Dublin

'European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists 14th Int'l Conference (EURASEAA14)'
September 18-21, 2013, Dublin, Ireland
Organizer: Dr. Helen Lewis (U. College Dublin)

EurASEAA14 was organized by University College Dublin School of Archaeology, bringing together over 200 archaeologists, art historians, and philologists studying Southeast Asia's past. Panels on topics of interest to Southeast Asian regional archaeology (including archaeobotany, human bioarchaeology, epigraphy, and mansucripts) were organized around the theme of 'Science, Archaeology and Heritage in Southeast Asia.' Special focus was given to Southeast Asian ceramics, building on momentum from an international workshop hosted by the University of Pennsylvania Museum and the Smithsonian Institution in 2010, as well as to Khmer archaeology, with additional subregional panels related to important 'peripheries,' 'crossroads' or 'boundaries' - Taiwan, Myanmar and Northeast India. Funding from Wenner-Gren supported twenty-one Southeast and South Asian scholars to attend and present conference papers.

Grant Year: 
2012
Award Amount: 
$15,000

Pryce, Thomas Oliver

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Oxford U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 13, 2009
Project Title: 
Pryce, Thomas Oliver, Oxford U., Oxford, United Kingdom - To aid research on 'The 'Iron Kuay': Ethnoarchaeological Investigations of Technological Continuity and Socio-Economic Interaction with the Angkorian Empire'

DR. THOMAS O. PRYCE, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom, was awarded funding in October 2009 to aid research on 'The 'Iron Kuay:' Ethno-Archaeological Investigations of Technological Continuity and Socio-Economic Interaction with the Angkorian Empire.' Wenner-Gren support facilitated study of a 1200 year production sequence in the Phnom Dek area, including Cambodia's oldest known iron smelting site, TBAD. While data analysis and interpretation is ongoing, the INDAP/IKP program has already invalidated a previous hypothesis that demand for iron from the Angkorian Empire was satisfied by smelting at PKKS using Phnom Dek minerals. Results indicate that Angkor may have been interdependent with numerous upland iron-smelting communities encircling their territory, under both state-controlled and potentially 'free' modes of production. Not only do IKP data mesh perfectly with those at PKKS in enhancing our understanding of the socioeconomic and socio-political functioning of the Angkorian Khmer Empire, the evidence they provide for technological continuity (not stasis) also constitute our first picture of long-term stable occupation in the area, potentially by Kuay ancestors.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$18,674

Brite, Elizabeth Baker

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Los Angeles, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
April 28, 2009
Project Title: 
Brite, Elizabeth Baker, U. of California, Los Angeles, CA - To aid research on 'The Reconstitution of Knowledge After Political Collapse: Evidence from the Production of Pottery in Ancient Khorezm, Uzbekistan,' supervised by Dr. Monica Louise Smith

ELIZABETH BAKER BRITE, then a student at the University of California, Los Angeles, California, received a grant in April 2009, to aid research on 'The Reconstitution of Knowledge after Political Collapse: Evidence from the Production of Pottery in Ancient Khorezm, Uzbekistan,' supervised by Dr. Monica L. Smith. The oasis of Khorezm in modern Uzbekistan is subject to instability of two kinds. As a region dependent on an unstable water system in an arid desert, Khorezm has experienced continual environmental perturbations associated with unpredictable changes in local hydrology. Patterns of political consolidation and collapse are also well documented in the archaeological and historical records of Khorezm, and tend to correlate generally with these ecosystem dynamics over time. A pertinent question emerges as to how populations in this region have historically sustained these repeated instances of collapse, and managed to maintain a resilient economy in such volatile circumstances. To address this question, archaeological research was conducted at the site of Kara-tepe in northwestern Uzbekistan to examine a period of collapse in the 4th -7th centuries A.D. The ceramic assemblage from Kara-tepe was analyzed and compared to materials from other sites to evaluate how the sharing of production knowledge changed throughout the crisis. This analysis was combined with new information on subsistence and settlement gathered from the excavations at Kara-tepe, to provide a complex picture of adaptive processes after collapse. Preliminary findings suggest that potters maintained external communication links over time, in spite of dramatic changes in the political landscape. In addition, it appears that inhabitants at Kara-tepe made unexpected, potentially deleterious trade-offs in the subsistence regime in order to provide continued support to the craft goods economy.

Publication Credit:

Brite, Elizabeth B., and John M. Marston. 2013. Environmental Change, Agricultural Innovation, and the Spread of Cotton Agriculture in the Old World. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 32(1):39-53.

Grant Year: 
2009
Award Amount: 
$11,329

Flad, Rowan K.

Grant Type: 
Int'l Collaborative Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 22, 2008
Project Title: 
Flad, Dr. Rowan K., Harvard U., Cambridge, MA; and Li, Dr. Shuicheng, Peking U., Beijing, P.R. China - To aid collaborative research on 'Changing Landscape and Settlement Patterns during the Rise of Complexity in the Chengdu Plain, Sichuan, China'

DR. ROWAN K. FLAD, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and DR. SHUICHENG LI, Peking University, Beijing, P.R. China, were awarded an International Collaborative Research Grant in May 2008, to aid collaborative research on 'Changing Landscape and Settlement Patterns during the Rise of Complexity in the Chengdu Plain, Sichuan, China.' During the 2008-10 field seasons, the Chengdu Plain Archaeological Survey conducted large-scale surface survey, systematic augering, geomorphological testing, and geophysical prospection in a 314 km-square area of the Chengdu Plain around the site of Gucheng, to investigate the changing patterns of settlement in this region during the Late Neolithic and Bronze Age periods. Large numbers of previously unknown sites were identified across the region. Throughout the time periods being investigated, sites are located consistently on landforms overlooking hydrological channels as reconstructed by the geomorphological work. Geophysical prospection identified archaeological features from different time periods, some of which were tested to extract archaeobotanical materials. The survey also identified broad changes in orientation of sites over time that suggest regional processes reorganized the pattern of human settlements --from one that was locally oriented to one that was partly tied into macro-regional processes -- that involved the establishment of a major political center in the area of the modern city of Chengdu. The data are integrated using a digital GIS database, and a workshop on GIS development a