Zhuang, Yijie

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Grant Year
2011

YIJIE ZHUANG, then a student at the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, received funding in April 2011, to aid research on 'Landscape Change and its Interaction with Prehistoric Human Activities: Geoarchaeological Investigation in North China,' supervised by Dr. Charles A.I. French. This study conducts geoarchaeological investigation on four early Neolithic sites in middle and lower Yellow River of North China.

Zhang, Liangren

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Grant Year
2015

Preliminary abstract: The project aims to explore into the early development of metallurgy in Eastern Xinjiang using metal artifacts uncovered from several Bronze Age and Early Iron Age cemeteries. Because of political and language barriers, this body of materials has been under-studied in international scholarship. The project will first deal with the origin of metallurgical knowledge in Eastern Xinjiang in the broad context of technological transmission and population migration across the Western Hexi Corrdor, the Mongolian Plateau, and the Minusinsk Basin.

Wang, Yiru

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Grant Year
2014

YIRU WANG, then a graduate student at Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom, was awarded a grant in May 2014 to aid research on 'The Origins of Sheep and Goat Domestication in Western China,' supervised by Dr. Graeme Barker. It has been long assumed that sheep and goats were not originally domesticated in China, but came from west Asia where they were domesticated since 10,000 BP. However, current zooarchaeological research in China has a basic problem in taxa identification and recognizing domestication.

Valentine, Benjamin Thomas

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Grant Year
2014

DR. BENJAMIN VALENTINE, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, received funding in February 2014 to aid engaged activities on 'Fostering Multi-Vocal and Interdisciplinary Approaches in Indian Archaeology through Broader Engagements with Indus Civilization Migration.' With an Engaged Anthropology Grant, the grantee returned to India to share the results of isotopic research on Indus Civilization migration and to encourage new ways of engaging with the archaeological past.

Spengler, Robert Nicholas

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Grant Year
2014

'The Introduction and Intensification of Agriculture in Central Eurasia: The Exception to the Rule or the Exception That Proves the Rule?'
March 19-22, 2015, German Archaeological Institute, Berlin, Germany
Organizers: Robert N Spengler III (Washington U.), Mayke Wagner (German Archaeological Institute), and Pavel Tarasov (Freie Universitat Berlin)

Solangaarachchi, Rose A.

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Grant Year
2003

ROSE SOLANGAARACHCHI, a student at the University of Florida, Gainesville, was awarded a grant in July 2003 to carry out archaeometallurgical research on 'Ancient Iron Smelting Technology and Settlement Pattern on the Kiri Oya Basin in the Dry Zone of Sri Lanka,' under the supervision of Prof. Peter R. Schmidt. Solangaarachchi's objective was to examine the metallurgical and socio-political aspects of ancient iron smelting through various methods of archaeology, and to study historical sources, oral traditions, etc. through methods from other subdisciplines of anthropology.

Shen, Guanjun

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Grant Year
2006

DR. GUANJUN SHEN, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, P.R. China, was awarded funding in April 2006 to aid research on '26A1/10Be Burial Dating of Peking Man Site at Zhoukoudian, China.' Zhoukoudian Locality I is world-renowned for containing the relics of Peking Man, an example of Homo erectus. Its timescale has long been pursued, but has remained debated due to the lack of suitable dating methods.

Schmaus, Tekla McCarthy

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Grant Year
2012

TEKLA MCCARTHY SCHMAUS, then a student at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, was awarded a grant in April 2012 to aid research on 'Seasonal Mobility and Social Structure in Bronze and Iron Age Semirech'ye, Kazakhstan,' supervised by Dr. K. Anne Pyburn. The Bronze Age in central Eurasia is beginning to be understood as a time in which nomadic groups took part in complex social interactions, dictated in part by the seasonal locations of their settlements.