Cleghorn, Naomi Elancia

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
California, Berkeley, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 17, 2008
Project Title: 
Cleghorn, Dr. Naomi Elancia, U. of California, Berkeley, CA - To aid research on 'The Upper Paleolithic Fauna of Mezmaiskaya (Russia): Implications for Human Behavior and Ecology'

DR. NAOMI E. CLEGHORN, University of California, Berkeley, California, received funding in October 2008 to aid research on 'The Upper Paleolithic Fauna of Mexmaiskaya (Russia): Implications for Human Behavior and Ecology.' This project investigated the ecology of Late and Terminal Pleistocene hominins in the Northwestern Caucasus Mountains using faunal remains recently excavated at Mezmaiskaya Cave. This locality is unique within the region in preserving a comprehensively dated stratigraphic sequence from the Middle Paleolithic, through the Late Upper Paleolithic, to the Epipaleolithic. It thus provides a critical perspective on the changing ecological parameters, as well as subsistence and social strategies of Late Neanderthals and Modern Humans at the boundary between the temperate Near East and the unstable glacial climate of Eastern Europe. The new analysis of the Upper and Epipaleolithic fauna from Mezmaiskaya is being used to address four significant questions: 1) Is there evidence for faunal resource intensification across the MP to UP boundary or later? 2) Is there evidence for intensification of site use over this period? 3) Is there a relationship between these variables and local environmental variation? and 4) What are the implications of the richer-than-expected bone industry for human social networks and technological adaptations in the Caucasus? In addition, the new analysis allows the development of a broader inter-regional comparison across the Caucasus with comparably dated sites in Georgia, particularly Ortvale Klde and Dzudzuana.

Grant Year: 
2008
Award Amount: 
$18,698

Honeychurch, William Henry

Grant Type: 
Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 19, 2005
Project Title: 
Honeychurch, Dr. Williams, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC - To aid research and writing on 'Not of Place but of Path: Inner Asia and the Spatial Politics of Empire' - Richard Carley Hunt Fellowship

DR. WILLIAM HONEYCHURCH, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, was awarded a Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship in May 2005 to aid research and writing on 'Not of Place but of Path: Inner Asia and the Spatial Politics of Empire.' The Eurasian steppe is often described as a territory of pathways, movement, interaction, and exchange. How these factors underwrote the long-term development of political traditions, techniques, and social relations that eventually produced some of the largest and most dynamic imperial states ever known, is a central question explored in this monograph project. Using archaeological data from the Egiin Gol valley in north central Mongolia, long-term trends in local landscape organization are examined in order to understand the changing sources of political finance and control on the steppe. The great size of steppe polities and their emphasis on horse based transport created political system reliant on vast spatial relationships. This 'spatial reach' was matched by internal methods of centralized integration. As polity size and spatial reach expanded over time and across different polities, increasing emphasis was placed upon the manipulation of mobility, its networks, and infrastructure for political ends. This monograph develops and examines the idea of a distinctive kind of 'politics for a mobile set1ing' and uses the concept to compare examples of large-scale imperial polities across different cultural and chronological settings.

Grant Year: 
2005
Award Amount: 
$38,160

Pan, Yi

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Sichuan U.
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2011
Project Title: 
Pan, Yi, Sichuan U., Sichuan, P.R. China - To aid training in archaeology at U. of Washington, Seattle, WA, supervised by Dr. Marcos Llobera
Grant Year: 
2011
Award Amount: 
$17,310

Asryan, Lena

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Artsakh State University
Status: 
Active Fellowship
Approve Date: 
July 25, 2013
Project Title: 
Asryan, Lena, Artsakh State U., Republic of Nagorno Karabakh, Azerbaijan - To aid write up in archaeology at U. of Rovira, Tarragona, Spain, supervised by Dr. Andreu Olle Canellas
Grant Year: 
2013
Award Amount: 
$17,400

d'Alpoim Guedes, Jade Aziz

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Harvard U.
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
May 5, 2010
Project Title: 
d'Alpoim Guedes, Jade Aziz, Harvard U., Cambridge, MA - To aid research on 'Adaptation and Invention during the Spread and Intensification of Agriculture in the Chengdu Plain,' supervised by Dr. Rowan K. Flad

JADE AZIZ D'ALPOIM GUEDES, then a student at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, was awarded a grant in May 2010, to aid research on 'Adaptation and Invention during the Spread and Intensification of Agriculture in the Chendu Plain,' supervise3d by Dr. Rowan K. Flad. In order to examine the relationship between changes in agricultural management regimes and the development of complex society, the grantee carried out fieldwork in the Chengdu Plain, Sichuan Province, P.RC.. During this fieldwork, macro botanical remains and samples for ancient starch were collected to document change in agricultural strategies from the earliest implantation of settlers in the area until the complex societies of the Bronze Age. Analysis of samples show that a change in subsistence from the low investment crop of broomcorn millet to labor intensive rice agriculture occurred between the first colonization of the area and the late Neolithic Baodun period. This change in subsistence is associated with other developments which indicate that people were able to harness larger labor forces, such as the construction of large walls surrounding settlements. The development of social complexity appears to be accompanied by restructuring in labor investments at the agricultural base and is closely linked to the development of rice agriculture in this region. Analysis of samples from the Bronze Age is currently underway and these samples will be analyzed using crop processing models to document how labor organization was restructured during this period.

Publication credits:

d'Alpoim Guedes, Jade, Ming Jiang, Kunyu He, Xiohong Wu, and Zhanghua Jiang. 2013. Site of Baodun Yields Earliest Evidence for the Spread of Rice and Foxtail Millet Agriculture to South-west China. Antiquity 87(377):751-771.

d'Alpoim Guedes, Jade. 2011. Millets, Rice, Social Complexity, and the Spread of Agriculture to the Chengdu Plain and Southwest China. Rice 4:104-113.

Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$6,826

Indrisano, Gregory G.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Pittsburgh, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
November 21, 2002
Project Title: 
Indrisano, Gregory G., U. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA - To aid research on 'Subsistence in Marginal Environments and its Correlations to Environmental Fluctuations and Changing Societal Complexity,' supervised by Dr. Katheryn M. Linduff

GREGORY G. INDRISANO, then a student at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, received funding in November 2002 to aid research on 'Subsistence in Marginal Environments and its Correlations to Environmental Fluctuations and Changing Societal Complexity,' supervised by Dr. Katheryn M. Linduff. Full coverage pedestrian surface survey of 102 square kilometers on the northern shore of Daihai Lake, Liangcheng County, Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region, PRC, recorded the extent of ancient habitation from 2900 BCE to 1400 CE. The goal of the project was to systematically record the spatial extent as well as the artifact density and geographic setting of ancient habitation in this region through time. The northern shore of Daihai lake included more than 750 hectares of total occupation producing more than 17,800 sherds from the Laohushan, Zhukaigou, Warring States, Han Dynasty, Liao Dynasty, Yuan Dynasty Periods. Little or no settlement hierarchy is apparent in the settlement pattern for this region until it was integrated into the Central Plain polities during the Warring States Period. From the Warring States into the Han Dynasty Periods, strong settlement hierarchies develop as this region was integrated into the Han Dynasty. After a period of low population this area was once again integrated into the Central Plain Dynasties of the Liao and Yuan, where even further hierarchies develop, centered on the rich lacustrine environment on the shore of Daihai Lake. Another goal of the project was to investigate how these administrative hierarchies affected subsistence strategies in the past. Preliminary results suggest that many of these spatially extensive, administratively complex polities required intensive farming from the peasant populations to feed the large number of unproductive residents. This intensive farming brought people together into densely packed site hierarchies that left little room for herding activities, and the intensive agricultural practices would have limited the ability of farmers to practice mixed economies. If these preliminary results are supported by future analysis, then subsistence is more closely connected with the demands made on farmers by complex polities than by changes in environment.

Grant Year: 
2002
Award Amount: 
$13,494

Pan, Yichung

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Aberdeen, U. of
Status: 
Active Grant
Approve Date: 
October 7, 2014
Project Title: 
Pan, Yichung, U. of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK - To aid research on 'The Colonisation and Abandonment of Neolithic Islandscapes: A Case Study from the Penghu Archipelago, Taiwan,' supervised by Dr. Keith Dobney

Preliminary abstract: This project aims to reinvestigate the evidence for the early occupation and exploitation of the Penghu archipelago, Taiwan by Neolithic settlers between 5000 to 4000B.P and to explore if the islands were abandoned by end of the Neolithic. By combining zooarchaeological, geoarchaeological and GIS approaches the project will enable the key relationships between site location, resource availability/exploitation and environmental factors to be established in order to throw new light on the important role this relatively unknown but key island archipelago played in the early expansion of Austronesian-speaking peoples from mainland ISEA. This research will apply and modify archaeological theory of both island and landscape archaeology and will help highlight and promote the combination of advanced GIS, geoarchaelogical and island zooarchaeological research within Taiwanese archaeology.

Grant Year: 
2014
Award Amount: 
$18,452

Asryan, Lena

Grant Type: 
Wadsworth Fellowship
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Artsakh State University
Status: 
Completed Fellowship
Approve Date: 
April 22, 2010
Project Title: 
Asryan, Lena, Artsakh State U., Republic of Nagorno Karabakh, Azerbaijan - To aid training in archaeology at U. of Rovira i Virgilii, Tarragona, Spain, supervised by Dr. Andreu Olle Canellas
Grant Year: 
2010
Award Amount: 
$17,394

Demeter, Fabrice

Grant Type: 
Post-Ph.D. Research Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Musee de l'homme
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
October 20, 2006
Project Title: 
Demeter, Dr. Fabrice, Musee de l'Homme, Paris, France - To aid research on 'Archaeological and Palaeontological Research on Upper Mekong River Terraces in Cambodia'

DR. FABRICE DEMETER, Musee de l'Homme, Paris, France, received funding in October 2006 to aid research on 'Archaeological and Palaeontological Research on Upper Mekong River Terraces in Cambodia.' Mainland Southeast Asia has been the place of a great amount of fieldwork since the nineteenth century, nevertheless little is known about the humans of the Pleistocene period. This research project focused on the history and evolution of modern human migrations in the region, and was based on lithic typology from the Mekong River, particularly from Sre Sbau, which was resulted from research undertaken by French geologists in the 1960s. Preliminary results reveal that the majority of current Cambodian lithic typology of the Upper Mekong terraces is based on biased material. This study illustrates how earlier projects mistook geofacts for artifacts, and proposes buffer zones along the Mekong River where research should be restricted in order to minimize the risk of similar misidentifications occurring in the future.

Grant Year: 
2006
Award Amount: 
$25,000

Law, Randall W.

Grant Type: 
Dissertation Fieldwork Grant
Insitutional Affiliation: 
Wisconsin, Madison, U. of
Status: 
Completed Grant
Approve Date: 
August 4, 2003
Project Title: 
Law, Randall W., U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI - To aid research on 'Inter-regional Interaction and Urbanism in the Indus Valley: Lithic Source Provenance Studies at Harappa,' supervised by Dr. Jonathan M. Kenoyer

RANDALL W. LAW, while a student at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin, received funding in August 2003 to aid research on lithic source provenances as indicators of interregional interaction in the Indus Valley, under the supervision of Dr. Jonathan M. Kenoyer. Law's objective was to produce a diachronic model of interregional interaction and resource access at the Indus civilization (ca. 2600-1700 B.C.E.) city of Harappa. This was accomplished through an analysis of the geological sources of important components of the site's large assemblage of rock and mineral artifacts. Harappa was well suited for the project, because its stratigraphic sequence spans the period in which the first urban, state-level society in South Asia developed. Law first identified and characterized lithic artifacts from Harappa using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. During fieldwork, he then collected comparative geological materials from potential rock and mineral sources in more than 70 localities in the states of Gujarat, Rajasthan, Jammu, Himachal Pradesh, and Uttaranchal. These samples were compared with steatite, chert, and agate-carnelian artifacts from Harappa using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Strontium isotope analysis was also used to determine the geologic age, and thus the regional provenance, of alabaster artifacts. Some of the resulting provenance determinations confirmed existing theories of trade and interaction in the prehistoric Indus region, whereas others raised new questions for further investigation.

Grant Year: 
2003
Award Amount: 
$25,000