Chemere, Yonatan Sahle

Approve Date
Grant Year
2014

Preliminary abstract: Complex projectiles (i.e. those delivered using a mechanical propeller) provide broader lethal ranges than throwing spears (i.e. 'simple' projectiles). They are therefore considered decisive for the successful adaptation and dispersal of modern humans during the Upper Pleistocene. The identification of such mechanically projected weapons in deep antiquity has proven difficult, as conclusive evidence indicating the mode of weapon delivery is as yet lacking from the African Middle Stone Age (MSA).

Chazan, Michael

Approve Date
Grant Year
2007

DR. MICHAEL CHAZAN, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, was awarded a grant in May 2007 to aid research on 'Archaeology of Wonderwerk Cave, Northern Cape Province, South Africa.' Research funded at Wonderwerk Cave (South Africa) has helped to establish it as one of the most important sites in Southern Africa. Research at the back of the cave (Excavation 6) indicates that over 0.180 Ma (the Fauresmith), hominins introduced into this dark locality (approximately 140m from the cave entrance) objects with special sensory properties.

Chazan, Michael

Approve Date
Grant Year
2011

'The 2012 Meeting of the Society of Africanist Archaeologists (SAfA)'
June 20-23, 2012, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
Organizers: Dr. Michael Chazan and Dr. Susan Pfeiffer (U. Toronto)

Cancellieri, Emanuele

Approve Date
Grant Year
2012

Preliminary abstract: Timing and routes of dispersal of H. sapiens across and out of the African continent are hotly debated. There is increasing evidence about a possible Saharan 'corridor' mostly based on environmental data, but archaeological data are scanty. The project principal aim is the acquisition of a new set of luminescence datings from selected MSA sites in SW Libya.

Cancellieri, Emanuele

Approve Date
Grant Year
2015

Preliminary abstract: Successfully adapted humans equipped with sophisticated early Middle Stone Age technology dispersed from East Africa to Northern Africa ca. 200.000 years ago as a consequence of environmental fragmentation. By a cultural point of view, the MSA of north Africa is deeply rooted in sub-saharan Lupemban culture, whose spread through North Africa gave rise to regional developments like the Nubian Complex in the Nile valley and the Aterian in the Sahara and the Maghreb.